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I know that for 1-dimensional arrays, I can do...

void g(int x[]) {}

void f(int a, int b)
{
    int x[a];
    g(x);
}

But with code such as...

void f(int a, int b)
{
    int x[a][b][4];
    g(x);
}

What would the type signature of g(x) look like?

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Your code won't compile. You cannot have a variable as an array length. –  Brian Clements Nov 9 '10 at 4:29
3  
This is C, not C90. It complies on any modern compiler. You might need the -std=c99 flag on gcc. –  Clark Gaebel Nov 9 '10 at 4:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
void g(int x[][b][4]) // b must be known in advance
{}

Otherwise explicitly pass b

For example:

void g(int b,int x[][b][4]){ 

} 

int main() 
{ 
    int a=4,b=6; 
    int x[a][b][4]; 
    g(b,x); 
    return 0; 
}
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I don't know b in advance. –  Clark Gaebel Nov 9 '10 at 4:35
1  
Oh, I can pass in b? That changes everything. Thanks! –  Clark Gaebel Nov 9 '10 at 4:43
1  
Note how within the function g(), the value of sizeof x[0] depends upon the passed value of b, and may be different from one invocation of the function to the next. –  caf Nov 9 '10 at 8:20

You need to specify the sizes of the arrays:

void g(int x[][2][3]){ 
    /* stuff */
} 

int main() 
{ 
    int x[1][2][3]; 
    g(x); 
    return 0; 
}
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Doesn't work for me. Clang: there.c:185:43: warning: incompatible pointer types passing '_Bool [problem.gridSize.x + 1][problem.gridSize.y + 1][4]' to parameter of type '_Bool ***' –  Clark Gaebel Nov 9 '10 at 4:30
    
fixed. It's been a while since I've done arrays like that. –  Brian Clements Nov 9 '10 at 4:37
    
that doesn't follow the format. 1 and 2 aren't known in advance. They are variables. It MUST be [a][b]. –  Clark Gaebel Nov 9 '10 at 4:38
    
I'm not familiar with your compiler, sorry. You might want to consider doing these as pointers to dynamic memory. Then you wouldn't have to worry about not knowing them in advance. –  Brian Clements Nov 9 '10 at 4:41
    
gcc or clang should work fine for this. –  Clark Gaebel Nov 9 '10 at 4:43

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