Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to use a php constants within a php function?

//in a different file
DEFINE ('HOST', 'hostname');
DEFINE ('USER', 'username');
DEFINE ('PASSWORD', 'password');
DEFINE ('NAME', 'dbname');

//conecting to database
function database()
{
    //using globle to define what varable to allow
    global $connection, HOST, USER, PASSWORD, NAME;
    $connection = new mysqli(HOST, USER, PASSWORD, NAME)
        or die ('Sorry, Cannot Connect');
    return $connection;
}

Update

Thanks for the replays - I have found the problem. It was a separate constant issue. I had just jumped the gun in posting this and was apparently reamed for it. Thanks for all the help…

share|improve this question
1  
This could be tested trivially. If there is a specific problem at hand, state that instead. –  erisco Nov 9 '10 at 6:25
    
why downvote a new user? –  Herr K Nov 9 '10 at 7:04
    
@Herr new or old, but he need to improve his phrasing skills first. –  Your Common Sense Nov 9 '10 at 7:15
5  
improving phrasing skills is something and discouraging is something entirely different. don't be a troll –  Herr K Nov 9 '10 at 7:27
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

you don't need to declare them in global in the function , the php recognise them as globals.

function database()
{
//using globle to define what varable to allow
global $dbc;
$connection = new mysqli(HOST, USER, PASSWORD, NAME)
or die ('Sorry, Cannot Connect');
return $connection;
}

from php.net

Like superglobals, the scope of a constant is global. You can access constants anywhere in your script without regard to scope. For more information on scope, read the manual section on variable scope.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just upvoted your answer but would like to point out that the php recognise them as superglobals. should be the php recognise them as globals. –  Mr. Alien Aug 28 '13 at 18:16
    
10x i will fix it –  Haim Evgi Aug 29 '13 at 4:32
add comment

Have you at least tried it? :)

From the manual:

Like superglobals, the scope of a constant is global. You can access constants anywhere in your script without regard to scope.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, but you don't need to call them "global". Constants are global. If you get unexpected T_STRING, expecting T_VARIABLE as an error, it's because it doesn't expect to see the constant references after a "global" statement.

share|improve this answer
add comment

define() produces global constants.

There are much better ways to store config items.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't seem like there is any clear conclusion that those are that much better. –  NickC Jun 19 '12 at 6:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.