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I'm working in a application with many modules each having it's own mercurial repository.

I initially thought it's good to have the modules in individual repositories but after a couple of releases, I feel something is not right. It's really a pain to create the branches and tags in all the modules.

Most, if not all modules follow a similar release cycle.

Should I go ahead and use a single repository for all the modules? Or is there a better way?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

A single repository for all modules means they are tightly coupled in their development lifecycle:

  • any branch applies to all modules (which is what you want)
  • any tag applies to all modules (which maynot be what you want)

If "v1.2" for your software has any meaning for each and everyone of your modules, then yes, having them all within one repo is useful.

If some modules are at v2.4 while another is at v3.6, and another at "v4.5", and..., then having independent modules declared as subrepos is best.


Lasse V. Karlsen comments:

if you're sharing things, like components and general framework libraries, they belong in their own repositories

Which is right, since the development lifecycle of said components and general framework libraries is completely unrelated to the one of the main program

But the OP adds:

We have two sets of modules:

  • a set of core modules that can be reused across many applications and
  • another set of modules for the respective application

So some of those modules (the "set of core modules") can be kept as subrepos (independent repos referenced by the parent repo and main project).

The others can be merged directly into the parent repo (kind of like the git subtree merge strategy) with the Hg tip you mention: "Combining Repositories"

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And in particular if you're sharing things, like components and general framework libraries, they belong in their own repositories. – Lasse V. Karlsen Nov 9 '10 at 8:04
    
@Lasse: yes, because the development lifecycle of said components and general framework libraries is completely unrelated to the one of your main program. But the OP's question seems to implies that those "modules" aren't in that category of "shared components". – VonC Nov 9 '10 at 8:10
    
Thanks VonC and Lasse for your valuable inputs. We have two sets of modules, a resusable "core" modules and application specific othe modules. From your tips, I think I should go with two repositories for these related module groups. – james Nov 9 '10 at 8:11
    
And I hope to "combine" the related module repositories so as to save the changesets. I'm thinking of using the tips mentioned in this article. hgtip.com/tips/advanced/2009-11-17-combining-repositories – james Nov 9 '10 at 8:15
    
Nice writeup to wrap it all! – james Nov 9 '10 at 9:08

If all these modules belong to a single project they should have a single repository. The module code can be grouped in directories within a single repo.

[Edit: based on comments]

The structure looks like :

  1. You have core modules ~ Platform
  2. Various other apps / modules that utilizes the core modules.

In such a case, the platform or core module can develop at a different speed than app modules. It is better to segregate them into separate repositories. Initially, it does look enticing that they both may follow similar release cycle but in any typical platform / application development, they do go out independently and out of sync. At least that has been my experience.

P1 -------P2 ------P3 ------p4

A1------A2--------------A3--------- (A1, A2, A3 utilize platform P1, P2, P3..)

B1--------B2----------B3---------   (B1, B2, B3 utilize platform P1, P2, P3..)

A3------------------B3--------------
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Thanks pyfunc. I have basically two set of modules, a set of core modules that can be reused across many applications and another set of modules for the respective application. – james Nov 9 '10 at 8:09
    
@james: It is my belief that platform / core should be kept independent of apps. Depending on size, a typical large platform develops at it's own pace than apps. – pyfunc Nov 9 '10 at 8:22
    
Thanks for your beautiful explanation. I was initially very confused about this. I was wondering whether I should use the subrepos feature. But that would have been totally wrong. The term "subrepos" really confused me. Thanks once again to all of you who spent your valuable time to help me. – james Nov 9 '10 at 8:30
    
@james: welcome :) – pyfunc Nov 9 '10 at 8:32
    
Excellent illustration. +1. And I do agree with your experience of those modules going "independently and out of sync". – VonC Nov 9 '10 at 8:49

It's really a pain to create the branches and tags in all the modules

Because this really not needed at all ("in all modules").

If you use Subrepo (or, better, GuestRepo - created exactly for your use-case and as compensation of some subrepo's drawbacks) extension and your Product is "SuperRepo", which contain only linked sub|guestrepos, then:

For every and each changeset in Superrepo state of all child-repos is known and predefined (each definition contain changeset-ID of foreign repo). Thus:

  • Then you tag, you can (have) only tag Superrepo - tagged changeset will have all (immutable) relations
  • Then you branch, you can don't branch submodules at all, or branch submodule when it needed for development, not for policy (final result in any case for SuperRepo - changed changeset ID in link to this subrepo): branch "Release N" doesn't require the same branch on submodules, only slightly more handwork in Superrepo

From POV of flexibility and manageability I still prefer separate repo for each low-level module (self-sufficient object, without external dependences) and GuestRepo for collecting modules in Product(s) and managing Product in it's lifecycle - I can't see "branching|tagging nightmare" here

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