Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What do those lines of code stand for?

payloadType = header[1] & 127;
sequenceNumber = unsigned_int(header[3]) + 256*unsigned_int(header[2]);
timeStamp = unsigned_int(header[7])
               + unsigned_int(header[6])
               + 65536*unsigned_int(header[5])
               + 16777216*unsigned_int(header[4]);

Where header is a byte[12] and the method unisigned_int is this:

private int unsigned_int(byte b) {
    if(b >= 0) {
        return b;
    }
    else {
        return 256 + b;
    }
}

Thank you for answering!

share|improve this question
1  
What's the question? The code manipulates the bits in a reasonably obvious fashion. What are you asking? –  Paul Nov 9 '10 at 11:02
    
Thanks to everyone for answering and for editing my post. I'm pretty new on stackoverflow and i'm getting into its vibe slowly. I apologize for my english as well. –  soneangel Jun 6 '11 at 9:06
    
Paul, my question was exactly about what this obvious fashion (for me not, I'm new) does: unsigned_int(header[3]) + 256*unsigned_int(header[2]) –  soneangel Jun 6 '11 at 9:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
 payloadType = header[1] & 127;

Strip the sign bit off header 1 / get bottom 7 bits

sequenceNumber = unsigned_int(header[3]) + 256*unsigned_int(header[2]);

extract a 16 bit value from the header

 timeStamp = unsigned_int(header[7])
           + unsigned_int(header[6])
           + 65536*unsigned_int(header[5])
           + 16777216*unsigned_int(header[4]);

extract a 32 bit value from the header. With the bug as observed by Mark Byers.

private int unsigned_int(byte b) {
     if(b >= 0) {
         return b;
     }
     else {
         return 256 + b;
     }
}

convert an integer from -128 to 127 (i.e. a byte) into a 8 bit unsigned int represented as an integer. Equivalent to

 return b & 255
share|improve this answer

It's converting bytes to integers.

I think there is a bug here:

+ 256 * unsigned_int(header[6])
  ^^^^^

Also instead of writing x * 256, x * 65536, x * 16777216 it would be more clear to write x << 8, x << 16, x << 24.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.