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I'm currently in a scenario in which i have to make use of partial classes. In this partial class I have a few methods that need to address fields in the other class.

for example

[edit: I'm sorry: the first class is already declared partial!]

   public partial class myClass{

   private string _myString;

    public string myString{
    get{return _myString;
    set{_myString=value;}
    }
}

and

public partial class myClass{

public void doSomething(){
myString="newString";
}

}

The problem is this. The compiler says MyString doesn't exist in the partial class! How can I overcome this problem?

Oh yeah, I'm programming C# here.

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are a few things you need to fix with the code you posted:

When using partial classes in C# all parts of the class must be declared as partial classes

You have

 public class myClass {}
 public partial class myClass {}

Which needs to become

public partial class myClass {}
public partial class myClass {}

Secondly, you're trying to set

myString="newString";

but myString is a public property without a setter.

So either you add a setter when declaring myString

public string myString
{
    get{ return _myString; }
    set { _myString = value; }
}

or just use

_myString="newString";

in your second partical class file.

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Is the partial class in the same namespace?

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You simply have to mark the class as partial in both places, not just one of them.

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When I put your code into Visual Studio I got a different error:

myString = "newString";
Error   Property or indexer 'ConsoleApplication1.Program.myClass.myString' cannot be assigned to -- it is read only

If I change it to this, it works fine:

_myString = "newString";

Edit:

You don't need to mark a class as partial in both palaces, this compiles fine:

    public class myClass
    {

        private string _myString;

        public string myString
        {
            get { return _myString; }
        }
    }


    public partial class myClass
    {

        public void doSomething()
        {
            _myString = "newString";
        }

    }
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While it might compile fine, in the documentation it says its required. Its probably a good idea to do it anyway to be consistent, and future proof. –  Khalos Nov 9 '10 at 11:25
    
I just followed what the forms designer does...naughty winForms designer! –  Pondidum Nov 9 '10 at 11:28
    
Huh thats funny. Someone didn't read their own specs! –  Khalos Nov 9 '10 at 11:32
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Assuming that both declaration refer to the same namespace, your first declaration does not contain the partial keyword:

Using the partial keyword indicates that other parts of the class, struct, or interface can be defined within the namespace. All the parts must use the partial keyword. All of the parts must be available at compile time to form the final type. All the parts must have the same accessibility, such as public, private, and so on.public, private, and so on.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-en/library/wa80x488(v=VS.80).aspx

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