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#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main()
{
        FILE *fp;
        fp=fopen("mydata.txt","r");
        if(fp==NULL)
        {
                perror("Error while opening");
                exit(0);
        }
        char *s=(char*)malloc(100);
        while(feof(fp)!=EOF)
        {
                fscanf(fp,"%[^\n]",s);
                printf("%s",s);
        }
        return 0;
}

I am trying to read a file line by line.I am getting infinite loop.Where it has gone wrong ?

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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use the following code to do it.

Your problems were that you weren't checking the return from fscanf and that you weren't actually reading the newline (so the next time you read, you wouldn't go to the next line).

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int main (void) {
    FILE *fp;
    int x;
    fp=fopen("mydata.txt","r");
    if(fp==NULL) {
        perror("Error while opening");
        exit(0);
    }
    char *s=(char*)malloc(100);
    while(!feof(fp)) {
        x = fscanf(fp,"%[^\n]",s);
        fgetc(fp);
        if (x == 1)
            printf("%s\n",s);
    }
    return 0;
}

However, if all you're after is the ability to input and process lines, fgets is a better solution than fscanf since there's no chance of buffer overflow:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define OK       0
#define NO_INPUT 1
#define TOO_LONG 2
static int getLine (char *prmpt, char *buff, size_t sz) {
    int ch, extra;

    // Get line with buffer overrun protection.
    if (prmpt != NULL) {
        printf ("%s", prmpt);
        fflush (stdout);
    }
    if (fgets (buff, sz, stdin) == NULL)
        return NO_INPUT;

    // If it was too long, there'll be no newline. In that case, we flush
    // to end of line so that excess doesn't affect the next call.
    if (buff[strlen(buff)-1] != '\n') {
        extra = 0;
        while (((ch = getchar()) != '\n') && (ch != EOF))
            extra = 1;
        return (extra == 1) ? TOO_LONG : OK;
    }

    // Otherwise remove newline and give string back to caller.
    buff[strlen(buff)-1] = '\0';
    return OK;
}

 

// Test program for getLine().

int main (void) {
    int rc;
    char buff[10];

    rc = getLine ("Enter string> ", buff, sizeof(buff));
    if (rc == NO_INPUT) {
        printf ("No input\n");
        return 1;
    }

    if (rc == TOO_LONG) {
        printf ("Input too long\n");
        return 1;
    }

    printf ("OK [%s]\n", buff);

    return 0;
}

Sample runs with 'hello', CTRLD, and a string that's too big:

pax> ./qq
Enter string> hello
OK [hello]

pax> ./qq
Enter string>
No input

pax> ./qq
Enter string> dfgdfgjdjgdfhggh
Input too long

pax> _
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errrrmmmm hmmmm ... did you check Jagan's profile? "Student, JNT university,Hyderabad." :-) –  pmg Nov 9 '10 at 14:21
    
@pmg: what do you mean ? –  Jagan Nov 9 '10 at 14:29
    
@Jagan: I believe this was your homework and pax gave you an answer that makes it more difficult (in my opinion) to learn from. But do take advantage of pax's answer and study it well. Try to understand why the different calls are where they are, what the ifs and whiles represent, ..., ... –  pmg Nov 9 '10 at 14:34
    
pmg: This is not homework, i am just practising programs. Most of my programming questions have been answered by pax only(satisfactory). I clearly understood his answer ..i accepted it ....that is all. –  Jagan Nov 9 '10 at 14:39
    
Ok then, keep having fun with C. Having fun is a great way to learn. And ask away: we (the SO users) are always going to answer --- sometimes more tersely, sometimes with a more detailed answer :-) –  pmg Nov 9 '10 at 14:47
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If the contents of the file are

"foo\nbar\n"

after reading "foo" into s the first time through the loop, what will the fscanf do next?

Always check the return value of scanf

if (fscanf(fp,"%[^\n]",s) == 1) {
    /* fscanf "worked" */
} else {
    /* fscanf "didn't work" */
}

Edit: example usage of scanf return value

int suminputs() {
    unsigned a, b, c, d
    int sum = 0;
    switch (scanf("%u%u%u%u", &a, &b, &c, &d)) {
        case 4: sum += d; /* fall through */ /* 4 inputs converted */
        case 3: sum += c; /* fall through */ /* 3 inputs converted */
        case 2: sum += b; /* fall through */ /* 2 inputs converted */
        case 1: sum += a; /* fall through */ /* 1 inputs converted */
        case 0: break;                       /* no inputs converted */
        default: sum = -1;                   /* input error */
    }
    return sum;
}
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+1 Wouldn't > EOF be more future proof? I guess it depends on whether you care whether exactly all items are matched or not. –  Skurmedel Nov 9 '10 at 13:36
    
>EOF doesn't mean anything, as the standard doesn't specify the value of EOF. It's usually -1, but might be 257 or similar. –  larsmans Nov 9 '10 at 13:41
    
@Skurmedel: no. EOF is a negative int (usually -1, but can be any thing); scanf returns the number of successful conversions done which can be 0 or EOF on error. Testing with > EOF tests for "if there was no error" which is very different to testing for "if the number of successful conversions done is the expected one". –  pmg Nov 9 '10 at 14:17
    
@pmg: Yes, I assumed it was zero. What I meant was bigger than zero and I realize the difference, if you look at the last sentence ;) –  Skurmedel Nov 9 '10 at 15:15
    
@Skurmedel: see my update. You might care about exactly how many items you got :-) –  pmg Nov 9 '10 at 15:31
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Use

while (!feof(fp))

feof returns a non-zero value at EOF, not necessarily EOF. Then, your call to fscanf reads up to a newline. After the first call, the fp points to the first newline in your file, so you have to "swallow" that, else fscanf doesn't read anything:

fscanf(fp,"%[^\n]\n",s);

Note that this also shallows space and tab characters. You may use getc(fp) instead, but then add another check to see if that fails, since otherwise you'll be printing the last line twice.

(Finally, you might want to print the newline back out with printf("%s\n", s);)

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But still it is going infinite loop...... –  Jagan Nov 9 '10 at 13:38
    
Fixed & updated. –  larsmans Nov 9 '10 at 13:39
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It should work by !feof(fp) if that still doesn't work, try fgets()

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Using fgets i think we can not give condition like reading a file till encounter '\n' or any other character. –  Jagan Nov 9 '10 at 13:41
    
fgets actually reads until \n –  Antoine Pelisse Nov 9 '10 at 13:46
    
oh ya thats true. But in this case fgets will read entire line, so \n is still getting satisfied. isnt it? –  prap19 Nov 9 '10 at 13:48
    
@Antonine exactly!! –  prap19 Nov 9 '10 at 13:48
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