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I have developed a JSP web application which, on every request, spawns a new Java Thread. In every newly spawned thread I create a Process using Runtime.exec() and store the process object in an instance variable in thread. I have a requirement in which I have to kill the created subprocess and also stop the thread. So, I overrode the interrupt method in the thread and in the overridden method I'm calling destroy() on already stored Process object in the instance variable. Following is the code:

public class MyThread extends Thread {
    private Process subprocess;

    @Override
    public void run() {
        subprocess = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("myprocess.exe");
        subprocess.waitFor();
        /*
            Some more statements
        */
    }

    @Override
    public void interrupt() {
        if(subprocess!=null) {
            System.out.println("Destroying Process");
            subprocess.destroy();
        }
        super.interrupt();
    }
}

Is it illeagal to override interrupt method? Its important that I kill the created process before I interrupt the thread that creates it. I see that the thread does get interrupted because the statements after waitFor() do not get executed. But, however, destroy() doesnt work (but gets called) and the created "myprocess.exe" completes execution even if I call interrupt() method before its completion. Can someone please help me out with this? What am I missing?

Thanks in advance

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's not illegal to override interrupt, but I wouldn't recommend it. Perhaps a cleaner way to do this would be:

public class MyThread extends Thread {
    private Process subprocess;

    @Override
    public void run() {
        subprocess = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("myprocess.exe");
        try {
            subprocess.waitFor();
        }
        catch (InterruptedException e) {
            subprocess.destroy();
        }
        /*
            Some more statements
        */
    }
}

Don't forget that you should also pull data from the subprocess output/error streams, otherwise you might wind up with full buffers and a blocked subprocess. It's OK to read from those streams and discard the data. I suspect the commons-io package has tools to make this a one-liner, otherwise it's a fairly simple method to write yourself.

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This worked for me Cameron, thanks a lot!! –  Kryptic Coder Nov 9 '10 at 15:32
    
but isnt InterruptedException thrown only if interrupt() method is called when thread is under blocking-wait state? Is it also thrown when the thread is under busy-waiting? Like in a for or while loop? –  Kryptic Coder Nov 9 '10 at 15:34
    
If you are busy-waiting, then you need to test Thread.interrupted() yourself. But why would you busy-wait? Spawn off a couple of daemon threads that each just read an InputStream to EOF, then die. One for subprocess.getInputStream() and one for subprocess.getErrorStream(). –  Jonathan Nov 9 '10 at 15:48
    
Thanks a lot, that helped!! –  Kryptic Coder Nov 9 '10 at 17:56
    
The InterruptedException gets caught but still, in the catch block, calling destroy() doesnt kill the subprocess. However when I do not pull the messages from the Input and Error Streams, The subprocess doesnt even start. Any idea why? –  Kryptic Coder Nov 10 '10 at 6:59
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