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We are writing some locking code and have run into a peculiar question. We use a ConcurrentHashMap for fetching instances of Object that we lock on. So our synchronized blocks look like this

synchronized(locks.get(key)) { ... }

We have overridden the get method of ConcurrentHashMap to make it always return a new object if it did not contain one for the key.

@Override
public Object get(Object key) {
   Object o = super.get(key);
   if (null == o) {
      Object no = new Object();
      o = putIfAbsent((K) key, no);
      if (null == o) {
         o = no;
      }
   }
   return o;
}

But is there a state in which the get-method has returned the object, but the thread has not yet entered the synchronized block. Allowing other threads to get the same object and lock on it.

We have a potential race condition were

  • thread 1: gets the object with key A, but does not enter the synchronized block
  • thread 2: gets the object with key A, enters a synchronized block
  • thread 2: removes the object from the map, exits synchronized block
  • thread 1: enters the synchronized block with the object that is no longer in the map
  • thread 3: gets a new object for key A (not the same object as thread 1 got)
  • thread 3: enters a synchronized block, while thread 1 also is in its synchronized block both using key A

This situation would not be possible if java entered the synchronized block directly after the call to get has returned. If not, does anyone have any input on how we could remove keys without having to worry about this race condition?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you have 2 options:

a. you could check the map once inside the synchronized block.

Object o = map.get(k);
synchronized(o) {
  if(map.get(k) != o) {
    // object removed, handle...
  }
}

b. you could extend your values to contain a flag indicating their status. when a value is removed from the map, you set a flag indicating that it was removed (within the sync block).

CacheValue v = map.get(k);
sychronized(v) {
  if(v.isRemoved()) {
    // object removed, handle...
  }
}
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I'll go with the first alternative here. I did the locking and re-locking if the key had changed using a while loop. –  Rouzbeh Delavari Nov 9 '10 at 17:23
    
Solution (1) seems to work fine. But it has the risk of thread starvation, and it is not so efficient due to the lock acquiring/releasing in a loop, in case of key change. –  Eyal Schneider Nov 9 '10 at 17:38
    
I see the problem but in our case, only one thread changes the keys and that thread only runs for short periods every 3 seconds. The race condition we are avoiding is very rare. Happened only a couple of times every two days or so in our production environment =) –  Rouzbeh Delavari Nov 9 '10 at 18:07

As I see it, the problem originates from the fact that you lock on map values, while in fact you need to lock on the key (or some derivation of it). If I understand correctly, you want to avoid 2 threads from running the critical section using the same key.

Is it possible for you to lock on the keys? can you guarantee that you always use the same instance of the key?

A nice alternative:

Don't delete the locks at all. Use a ReferenceMap with weak values. This way, a map entry is removed only if it is not currently in use by any thread.

Note:

1) Now you will have to synchronize this map (using Collections.synchronizedMap(..)).

2) You also need to synchronize the code that generates/returns a value for a given key.

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Hi, Wouldn't using a ReferenceMap give me the same problems as with the ConcurrentHashMap, but instead with the GC removing entries at any time? Since my keys are arbitrary long values that are calculated before locking is done, the code does not keep any references to the keys in between calls. –  Rouzbeh Delavari Nov 9 '10 at 16:27
    
@Rouzbeh Delavari: Entries are not removed "at any time". Remember that as long as a thread holds a particular lock, it is strongly referenced, so GC can't dispose of it. For the original problem to occur, there must be a thread running the critical section on lock L, while L is not in the map anymore. This can't happen here. –  Eyal Schneider Nov 9 '10 at 17:14
    
You are right, I must have missed the part with weak values and thought of weak keys. –  Rouzbeh Delavari Nov 9 '10 at 17:35

The code as is, is thread safe. That being said, if you are removing from the CHM then any type of assumptions that are made when synchronizing on an object returned from the collection will be lost.

But is there a state in which the get-method has returned the object, but the thread has not yet entered the synchronized block. Allowing other threads to get the same object and lock on it.

Yes, but that happens any time you synchronize on an Object. What is garunteed is that the other thread will not enter the synchronized block until the other exists.

If not, does anyone have any input on how we could remove keys without having to worry about this race condition?

The only real way of ensuring this atomicity is to either synchronize on the CHM or another object (shared by all threads). The best way is to not remove from the CHM.

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Thanks for all the great suggestions and ideas, really appreciate it! Eventually this discussion made me come up with a solution that does not use objects for locking.

Just a brief description of what we're actually doing.

We have a cache that receives data continuously from our environment. The cache has several 'buckets' for each key and aggregated events into the buckets as they come in. The events coming in have a key that determines the cache entry to be used, and a timestamp determining the bucket in the cache entry that should be incremented.

The cache also has an internal flush task that runs periodically. It will iterate all cache entries and flushes all buckets but the current one to database.

Now the timestamps of the incoming data can be for any time in the past, but the majority of them are for very recent timestamps. So the current bucket will get more hits than buckets for previous time intervals.

Knowing this, I can demonstrate the race condition we had. All this code is for one single cache entry, since the issue was isolated to concurrent writing and flushing of single cache elements.

// buckets :: ConcurrentMap<Long, AtomicLong>

void incrementBucket(long timestamp, long value) {
   long key = bucketKey(timestamp, LOG_BUCKET_INTERVAL);
   AtomicLong bucket = buckets.get(key);
   if (null == bucket) {
      AtomicLong newBucket = new AtomicLong(0);
      bucket = buckets.putIfAbsent(key, newBucket);
      if (null == bucket) {
          bucket = newBucket;
      }
   }

   bucket.addAndGet(value);
}

Map<Long, Long> flush() {
   long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
   long nowKey = bucketKey(now, LOG_BUCKET_INTERVAL);

   Map<Long, Long> flushedValues = new HashMap<Long, Long>();
   for (Long key : new TreeSet<Long>(buckets.keySet())) {
      if (key != nowKey) {
         AtomicLong bucket = buckets.remove(key);
         if (null != bucket) {
            long databaseKey = databaseKey(key);
            long n = bucket.get()
            if (!flushedValues.containsKey(databaseKey)) {
               flushedValues.put(databaseKey, n);
            } else {
               long sum = flushedValues.get(databaseKey) + n;
               flushedValues.put(databaseKey, sum);
            }
         }
      }
   }

   return flushedValues;
}

What could happen was: (fl = flush thread, it = increment thread)

  • it: enters incrementBucket, executes until just before the call to addAndGet(value)
  • fl: enters flush and iterates the buckets
  • fl: reaches the bucket that is being incremented
  • fl: removes it and calls bucket.get() and stores the value to the flushed values
  • it: increments the bucket (which will be lost now, because the bucket has been flushed and removed)

The solution:

void incrementBucket(long timestamp, long value) {
   long key = bucketKey(timestamp, LOG_BUCKET_INTERVAL);

   boolean done = false;
   while (!done) {
      AtomicLong bucket = buckets.get(key);
      if (null == bucket) {
         AtomicLong newBucket = new AtomicLong(0);
         bucket = buckets.putIfAbsent(key, newBucket);
         if (null == bucket) {
             bucket = newBucket;
         }
      }

      synchronized (bucket) {
         // double check if the bucket still is the same
         if (buckets.get(key) != bucket) {
            continue;
         }
         done = true;

         bucket.addAndGet(value);
      }
   }
}

Map<Long, Long> flush() {
   long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
   long nowKey = bucketKey(now, LOG_BUCKET_INTERVAL);

   Map<Long, Long> flushedValues = new HashMap<Long, Long>();
   for (Long key : new TreeSet<Long>(buckets.keySet())) {
      if (key != nowKey) {
         AtomicLong bucket = buckets.get(key);
         if (null != value) {
            synchronized(bucket) {
               buckets.remove(key);
               long databaseKey = databaseKey(key);
               long n = bucket.get()
               if (!flushedValues.containsKey(databaseKey)) {
                  flushedValues.put(databaseKey, n);
               } else {
                  long sum = flushedValues.get(databaseKey) + n;
                  flushedValues.put(databaseKey, sum);
               }
            }
         }
      }
   }

   return flushedValues;
}

I hope this will be useful for others that might run in to the same problem.

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The two code snippets you've provided are fine, as they are. What you've done is similar to how lazy instantiation with Guava's MapMaker.makeComputingMap() might work, but I see no problems with the way that the keys are lazily created.

You're right by the way that it's entirely possible for a thread to be prempted after the get() lookup of a lock object, but before entering sychronized.

My problem is with the third bullet point in your race condition description. You say:

thread 2: removes the object from the map, exits synchronized block

Which object, and which map? In general, I presumed that you were looking up a key to lock on, and then would be performing some other operations on other data structures, within the synchronized block. If you're talking about removing the lock object from the ConcurrentHashMap mentioned at the start, that's a massive difference.

And the real question is whether this is necessary at all. In a general purpose environment, I don't think there will be any memory issues with just remembering all of the lock objects for all the keys that have ever been looked up (even if those keys no longer represent live objects). It is much harder to come up with some way of safely disposing of an object that may be stored in a local variable of some other thread at any time, and if you do want to go down this route I have a feeling that performance will degrade to that of a single coarse lock around the key lookup.

If I've misunderstood what's going on there then feel free to correct me.

Edit: OK - in which case I stand by my above claim that the easiest way to do this is not remove the keys; this might not actually be as problematic as you think, since the rate at which the space grows will be very small. By my calculations (which may well be off, I'm not an expert in space calculations and your JVM may vary) the map grows by about 14Kb/hour. You'd have to have a year of continuous uptime before this map used up 100MB of heap space.

But let's assume that the keys really do need to be removed. This poses the problem that you can't remove a key until you know that no threads are using it. This leads to the chicken-and-egg problem that you'll require all threads to synchronize on something else in order to get atomicity (of checking) and visibility across threads, which then means that you can't do much else than slap a single synchronized block around the whole thing, completely subverting your lock striping strategy.

Let's revisit the constraints. The main thing here is that things get cleared up eventually. It's not a correctness constraint but just a memory issue. Hence what we really want to do is identify some point at which the key could definitely no longer be used, and then use this as the trigger to remove it from the map. There are two cases here:

  1. You can identify such a condition, and logically test for it. In which case you can remove the keys from the map with (in the worst case) some kind of timer thread, or hopefully some logic that's more cleanly integrated with your application.
  2. You cannot identify any condition by which you know that a key will no longer be used. In this case, by definition, there is no point at which it's safe to remove the keys from the map. So in fact, for correctness' sake, you must leave them in.

In any case, this effectively boils down to manual garbage collection. Remove the keys from the map when you can lazily determine that they're no longer going to be used. Your current solution is too eager here since (as you point out) it's doing the removal before this situation holds.

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Thanks for your response. The component we are using this in is not using the locks for modifying the map. What the actual procedure does is to update buckets of counters. But these counters might get flushed to DB by other threads than those doing the updates. There are new keys for every 2-second intervals and that is the reason for why we want to remove keys. Otherwise , the map would just keep on growing as time passes and eventually cause an OutOfMemoryException. –  Rouzbeh Delavari Nov 9 '10 at 16:07
    
Actually you can determine when a key is not in use anymore very efficiently. See my solution, which uses weak references. –  Eyal Schneider Nov 9 '10 at 18:49

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