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So now I have a

int main (int argc, char *argv[]){}

how to make it string based? will int main (int argc, std::string *argv[]) be enough?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to create a string out of the input parameters passed, you can also add character pointers to create a string yourself

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

string passedValue;
for(int i = 1; i < argc; i++)
 passedValue += argv[i];
    // ...
    return 0;
}
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You can't change main's signature, so this is your best bet:

#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::vector<std::string> params(argv, argv+argc);
    // ...
    return 0;
}
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1  
Yep, +1 from me, although usually you want argv+1, argv+argc (because argv+0 is the application name). –  sbi Nov 9 '10 at 15:22
    
+1 for it's a really good way: simple and efficient. –  Matthieu M. Nov 9 '10 at 15:23
    
@sbi, yeah- that's important to keep in mind, but I was trying to keep it simple :) –  luke Nov 9 '10 at 15:30

That would be non-standard because the Standard in 3.6.1 says

An implementation shall not predefine the main function. This function shall not be overloaded. It shall have a return type of type int, but otherwise its type is implementation-defined. All implementations shall allow both of the following definitions of main:

int main() { /* ... */ }

and

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { /* ... */ }

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+1: somehow acrobat was hanging on my machine :) –  Chubsdad Nov 9 '10 at 14:59
    
@Chubsdad : I use Foxit ;-) –  Prasoon Saurav Nov 9 '10 at 14:59

No. That is not allowed. If present, it is mandated to be char *argv[].

BTW, in C++ main should always be declared to return 'int'

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You can't do it that way, as the main function is declared explicitly as it is as an entry point. Note that the CRT knows nothing about STL so would barf anyway. Try:

#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::vector<std::string> args;
    for(int i(0); i < argc; ++i)
        args.push_back(argv[i]);

    // ...

    return(0);
}; // eo main
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1  
vow. like that i(0) syntax +1 –  Chubsdad Nov 9 '10 at 14:58
3  
Since you know the size of the resulting vector, you could use vector's size constructor to preallocate, avoiding possible multiple reallocations with .push_back(). You could also use vector's iterator constructor to avoid having to write the loop yourself. –  luke Nov 9 '10 at 15:06
    
@luke, yup I saw your response and +1'd it as it is far cleaner than mine. –  Moo-Juice Nov 9 '10 at 15:26

main receives char*. you will have to put the argv array into std::strings yourself.

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main does not pass anything. instead, main is passed char* by the CRT –  Chubsdad Nov 9 '10 at 14:56

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