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I have a DetailsView with a TextBox and I want the input data be saved always with the FIRST LETTER IN CAPITAL.

Example:

"red" --> "Red"
"red house" --> " Red house"

How can I achieve this maximizing performance?

share|improve this question
    
questions corrected thanks –  GibboK Nov 9 '10 at 15:30
5  
@Bobby: It's not a duplicate: the OP asks to capitalize the first letter of a string, the question in the link capitalizes the first letter of each word. –  GvS Nov 9 '10 at 16:31
1  
@GvS: The first answer is very detailed and the first code-block is exactly what he is looking for. Also, between capitalising every word and only the first word is just one loop difference. –  Bobby Nov 9 '10 at 17:23
    
Did you ever get this resolved successfully? Do you still need help with this? –  jcolebrand Dec 14 '10 at 4:19
1  
But you said, and I quote, "Make first letter of EACH WORD upper case". Therefore, why "red house" --> " Red house"? Why the "h" of "house" is not a capital letter? –  Guillermo Gutiérrez Oct 30 '12 at 20:02

24 Answers 24

up vote 112 down vote accepted
public static string FirstCharToUpper(string input)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
        throw new ArgumentException("ARGH!");
    return input.First().ToString().ToUpper() + String.Join("", input.Skip(1));
}

EDIT: This version is shorter. For a faster solution take a look at Equiso's answer

public static string FirstCharToUpper(string input)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
        throw new ArgumentException("ARGH!");
    return input.First().ToString().ToUpper() + input.Substring(1);
}
share|improve this answer
5  
that is a good one! –  GibboK Dec 16 '10 at 20:27
    
i like this solution! –  Eric Frick Oct 21 '11 at 19:34
1  
Because first parameter of String.Join is separator with which to join strings given with second parameter. –  Dialecticus Feb 10 '12 at 16:11
7  
I really like your answer, but var arr = input.ToCharArray(); arr[0] = Char.ToUpperInvariant(arr[0]); return new String(arr); would probably gain some speed since you are creating less immutable objects (and especially you are skipping the String.Join). This of course depends on the length of the string. –  flindeberg Aug 26 '13 at 14:22
2  
Awesome - Using Linq makes it very clear what this code does. –  Daniel James Bryars Nov 27 '13 at 15:12
public string FirstLetterToUpper(string str)
{
    if (str == null)
        return null;

    if (str.Length > 1)
        return char.ToUpper(str[0]) + str.Substring(1);

    return str.ToUpper();
}

Old answer: This makes every first letter to upper case

public string ToTitleCase(string str)
{
    return CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(str.ToLower());
}
share|improve this answer
    
But this converts every first letter of a word to uppercase, not only the first character of a string. –  GvS Nov 9 '10 at 15:42
    
@GvS, that's what the question asks you to do. –  thattolleyguy Nov 9 '10 at 15:45
    
He asks "red house" => "Red house". ToTitleCase will give you "Red House". –  GvS Nov 9 '10 at 15:47
1  
You're right, I must have misread that. Thanks for the clarification. –  thattolleyguy Nov 9 '10 at 15:53
    
@GvS, you are correct I'll update my answer –  Equiso Nov 9 '10 at 16:17

You can use "ToTitleCase method"

string s = new CultureInfo("en-US").TextInfo.ToTitleCase("red house");
//result : Red House

this extention method solve every titlecase problem.

easy to usage

string str = "red house";
str.ToTitleCase();
//result : Red house

string str = "red house";
str.ToTitleCase(TitleCase.All);
//result : Red House

the Extention method

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Globalization;

namespace Test
{
    public static class StringHelper
    {
        private static CultureInfo ci = new CultureInfo("en-US");
        //Convert all first latter
        public static string ToTitleCase(this string str)
        {
            str = str.ToLower();
            var strArray = str.Split(' ');
            if (strArray.Length > 1)
            {
                strArray[0] = ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(strArray[0]);
                return string.Join(" ", strArray);
            }
            return ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(str);
        }
        public static string ToTitleCase(this string str, TitleCase tcase)
        {
            str = str.ToLower();
            switch (tcase)
            {
                case TitleCase.First:
                    var strArray = str.Split(' ');
                    if (strArray.Length > 1)
                    {
                        strArray[0] = ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(strArray[0]);
                        return string.Join(" ", strArray);
                    }
                    break;
                case TitleCase.All:
                    return ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(str);
                default:
                    break;
            }
            return ci.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(str);
        }
    }

    public enum TitleCase
    {
        First,
        All
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with you solution is that "red house" will be converted to "Red House" and not to "Red house" as it was asked in the question. –  Vadim Oct 9 '13 at 19:31
    
@Vadim i editted the answer please check it out :) –  Tacettin Özbölük Oct 10 '13 at 8:18
1  
@Tacttin It will work but the following code is easier to read and performs better char.ToUpper(text[0]) + ((text.Length > 1) ? text.Substring(1).ToLower() : string.Empty); You can read more @ vkreynin.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/… –  Vadim Oct 10 '13 at 18:07

For the first letter, with error checking:

public string CapitalizeFirstLetter(string s)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        return s;
    if (s.Length == 1)
        return s.ToUpper();
    return s.Remove(1).ToUpper() + s.Substring(1);
}
share|improve this answer

This will do it although it will also make sure that there are no errant capitals that are not at the beginning of the word.

public string(string s)
{
System.Globalization.CultureInfo c = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("en-us", false)
System.Globalization.TextInfo t = c.TextInfo;

return t.ToTitleCase(s);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
"en-US" ???? So I can't capitalize in Klingon? –  Carlos Muñoz Dec 10 '10 at 5:21
    
Needs a null check of s before the call to ToTitleCase. –  Big T May 11 at 3:02

Since I happened to be working on this also, and was looking around for any ideas, this is the solution I came to. It uses LINQ, and will be able to capitalize the first letter of a string, even if the first occurrence isn't a letter. Here's the extension method I ended up making.

public static string CaptalizeFirstLetter(this string data)
{
    var chars = data.ToCharArray();

    // Find the Index of the first letter
    var charac = data.First(char.IsLetter);
    var i = data.IndexOf(charac);

    // capitalize that letter
    chars[i] = char.ToUpper(chars[i]);

    return new string(chars);
}

I'm sure there's a way to optimize or clean this up a little bit.

share|improve this answer
public static string ToInvarianTitleCase(this string self)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(self))
    {
        return self;
    }

    return CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(self);
}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

static public string UpperCaseFirstCharacter(this string text) {
    return Regex.Replace(text, "^[a-z]", m => m.Value.ToUpper());
}
share|improve this answer
2  
or perhaps some other character class (i.e. alphanumeric \w), so that the function is unicode-aware –  Dmitry Ledentsov Aug 26 '13 at 12:51
string s_Val = "test";
if (s_Val != "")
{
   s_Val  = char.ToUpper(s_Val[0]);
   if (s_Val.Length > 1)
   {
      s_Val += s_Val.Substring(1);
   }
 }
share|improve this answer
2  
What if the string is only 0 or 1 character long? –  GvS Nov 9 '10 at 15:33
2  
What if it is null? –  Equiso Nov 9 '10 at 16:08

As BobBeechey suggests in his response to this question, the following code will work for this:

private void txt_fname_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    char[] c = txt_fname.Text.ToCharArray();
    int j;
    for (j = 0; j < txt_fname.Text.Length; j++)
    {
        if (j==0) c[j]=c[j].ToString().ToUpper()[0];
        else c[j] = c[j].ToString().ToLower()[0];
    }
    txt_fname.Text = new string(c); 
    txt_fname.Select(txt_fname.Text.Length, 1);
}
share|improve this answer
    

If performance/memory usage is an issue then, this one only creates one (1) StringBuilder and one (1) new String of the same size as the Original string.

public static string ToUpperFirst(this string str) {
  if( !string.IsNullOrEmpty( str ) ) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(str);
    sb[0] = char.ToUpper(sb[0]);

    return sb.ToString();

  } else return str;
}
share|improve this answer
string emp="TENDULKAR";
string output;
output=emp.First().ToString().ToUpper() + String.Join("", emp.Skip(1)).ToLower();
share|improve this answer
    
Why ToLower() at the tail?. There is no requirement for other letters but the first one. –  Carlos Muñoz Oct 22 '13 at 16:41
    
String is can be anything its Upper or Lower.so its a generic solution for all string. –  Shailesh Nov 11 '13 at 4:55

I found something here http://www.dotnetperls.com/uppercase-first-letter :

static string UppercaseFirst(string s)
{
// Check for empty string.
if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
{
    return string.Empty;
}
// Return char and concat substring.
return char.ToUpper(s[0]) + s.Substring(1);
}

maybe this helps!!

share|improve this answer

Here's a way to do it as an extension method:

static public string UpperCaseFirstCharacter(this string text)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
    {
        return string.Format(
            "{0}{1}",
            text.Substring(0, 1).ToUpper(),
            text.Substring(1));
    }

    return text;
}

Can then be called like:

//yields "This is Brian's test.":
"this is Brian's test.".UpperCaseFirstCharacter(); 

And here's some unit tests for it:

[Test]
public void UpperCaseFirstCharacter_ZeroLength_ReturnsOriginal()
{
    string orig = "";
    string result = orig.UpperCaseFirstCharacter();

    Assert.AreEqual(orig, result);
}

[Test]
public void UpperCaseFirstCharacter_SingleCharacter_ReturnsCapital()
{
    string orig = "c";
    string result = orig.UpperCaseFirstCharacter();

    Assert.AreEqual("C", result);
}

[Test]
public void UpperCaseFirstCharacter_StandardInput_CapitalizeOnlyFirstLetter()
{
    string orig = "this is Brian's test.";
    string result = orig.UpperCaseFirstCharacter();

    Assert.AreEqual("This is Brian's test.", result);
}
share|improve this answer

Use the following code:

string  strtest ="PRASHANT";
strtest.First().ToString().ToUpper() + strtest.Remove(0, 1).ToLower();
share|improve this answer

With this method you can upper the first char of every word.

Example "HeLlo wOrld" => "Hello World"

public static string FirstCharToUpper(string input)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(input))
        throw new ArgumentException("Error");
    return string.Join(" ", input.Split(' ').Select(d => d.First().ToString().ToUpper() +  d.ToLower().Substring(1)));
}
share|improve this answer

Seems like none of the solutions given here will deal with a white space before the string.

Just adding this as a thought:

public static string SetFirstCharUpper2(string aValue, bool aIgonreLeadingSpaces = true)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(aValue))
        return aValue;

    string trimmed = aIgonreLeadingSpaces 
           ? aValue.TrimStart() 
           : aValue;

    return char.ToUpper(trimmed[0]) + trimmed.Substring(1);
}   

It should handle this won't work on other answers (that sentence has a space in the beginning), and if you don't like the space trimming, just pass a false as second parameter (or change the default to false, and pass true if you want to deal with space)

share|improve this answer

There seems to be a lot of complexity here when all you need is:

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the input string with the first character converted to uppercase if a letter
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>Null input returns null</remarks>
    public static string FirstLetterToUpperCase(this string s)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s))
            return s;

        return char.ToUpper(s[0]) + s.Substring(1);
    }

Noteworthy points:

  1. Its an extension method.

  2. If the input is null, empty or whitespace the input is returned as is.

  3. String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace was introduced with .NET Framework 4. This won't work with older frameworks.

share|improve this answer


this methods looks also next words for uppercase;


hello world -- Hello World
galatasaray fc -- Galatasaray Fc
galatasaray FC -- Galatasaray FC

public  string UppercaseWords(string value)
       {
           char[] array = value.ToCharArray();

           if (array.Length >= 1)
           {
               if (char.IsLower(array[0]))
               {
                   array[0] = char.ToUpper(array[0]);
               }
           }

           for (int i = 1; i < array.Length; i++)
           {
               if (array[i - 1] == ' ')
               {
                   if (char.IsLower(array[i]))
                   {
                       array[i] = char.ToUpper(array[i]);
                   }
               }
           }
           return new string(array);
       }
share|improve this answer
    
this is slow; i wouldn't recommend it to anyone –  HellBaby Nov 14 at 6:57

I took the fastest method from http://www.dotnetperls.com/uppercase-first-letter and converted to extension method:

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the input string with the first character converted to uppercase
    /// </summary>
    public static string FirstLetterToUpperCase(this string s)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        {
            return string.Empty;
        }
        char[] a = s.ToCharArray();
        a[0] = char.ToUpper(a[0]);
        return new string(a);
    }
share|improve this answer

send a string to this function. it will first check string is empty or null, if not string will be all lower chars. then return first char of string upper rest of them lower.

string FirstUpper(string s)
    {
        // Check for empty string.
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        {
            return string.Empty;
        }
        s = s.ToLower();
        // Return char and concat substring.
        return char.ToUpper(s[0]) + s.Substring(1);
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Please add brief detail about your answer for the benefit of other readers. –  Mohit Jain Dec 9 at 11:43
    
added... ty for warning. –  TheMuyu Dec 9 at 11:51
string input = "red HOUSE";
System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder(input);

for (int j = 0; j < sb.Length; j++)
{
    if ( j == 0 ) //catches just the first letter
        sb[j] = System.Char.ToUpper(sb[j]);
    else  //everything else is lower case
        sb[j] = System.Char.ToLower(sb[j]);
}
// Store the new string.
string corrected = sb.ToString();
System.Console.WriteLine(corrected);
share|improve this answer

This capitalizes this first letter and every letter following a space and lower cases any other letter.

public string CapitalizeFirstLetterAfterSpace(string input)
{
    System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder(input);
    bool capitalizeNextLetter = true;
    for(int pos = 0; pos < sb.Length; pos++)
    {
        if(capitalizeNextLetter)
        {
            sb[pos]=System.Char.ToUpper(sb[pos]);
            capitalizeNextLetter = false;
        }
        else
        {
            sb[pos]=System.Char.ToLower(sb[pos]);
        }

        if(sb[pos]=' ')
        {
            capitalizeNextLetter=true;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or if you don't want to write walls of code - CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase(theString); does the same thing. –  Alex Ford Nov 9 '10 at 15:48
    
Yeah... I didn't know about that :) And due to my massive amount of code, everyone else's answers popped up while I was still typing. –  thattolleyguy Nov 9 '10 at 15:51
    
Gotta learn somewhere ;) –  Alex Ford Nov 9 '10 at 15:52

Simplest and fastest way is to replace the first char of the string by making it an upper case char:

string str = "test";<br>
str = str.Replace(str[0], char.ToUpper(str[0]));
share|improve this answer
    
Totally wrong.. –  Shadow Wizard Oct 10 '13 at 8:27

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