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I use LINQ to create my where clause like so:

var query = from x in context.Xs
            select x;

if (y == ...)
{
    query = query.Where(x => x.Y == 1);
}

I have bunch of these "if .... where" statements. The issue I have is that all of those wheres join where clauses using AND but I need all my where clauses to use OR. Is there an easy way to port this code into where OR code? Or even what is the easiest way to do this with OR?

Thanks.

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2  
Possible duplicate of Linq: “Or” equivalent of Where()‌​. –  rsenna Nov 9 '10 at 16:42
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

PredicateBuilder is the perfect solution for your problem. It allows you to keep adding individual "AND" as well as "OR" statements together.

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I had to copy the class from the link provided into my project and to use predicate.Compile() in where statement. –  Massive Boisson Nov 11 '10 at 14:27
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I would suggest using Expression Trees to build your query dynamically:

(MSDN) How to: Use Expression Trees to Build Dynamic Queries

You could also use a PredicateBuilder (which does something similar under the hood) to build the Predicate dynamically and then pass the final Predicate to the Where method.

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You could do something like:

var query = from x in context.Xs
        where
          (x.X == 1) ||
          (x.Y == 2) ||
          (x.Z == "3")
        select x;
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CAVEAT: I haven't tested this out, but maybe you can do something like this:

var query = from x in list
            select x;

List<Func<string, bool>> conditions = new List<Func<string, bool>>();

if(true) {
    conditions.Add(x => x.First() == 's');
}
else if (true) {
    conditions.Add(x => x.First() == 'h');
}

var result = query.Where(x => conditions.Any(y => y.Invoke(x)));
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No, it doesn't work like that I'm afraid –  Marc Gravell Nov 9 '10 at 17:26
    
:-( it was just a thought –  Roly Nov 10 '10 at 16:16
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