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Could you create an object from a class named Trung.NguyenThe since NguyenThe isn't a method ?

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Just a thought: why do you need this anyway? Visually it means a type "NguyenThe" inside the type "Trung". –  Kangkan Nov 9 '10 at 16:52
    
What if "NguyenThe" is a special type in general Class "Trung" ? Sorry everyone, I'm just curious about making class in class. –  Little Jack Nov 9 '10 at 16:55
    
var x = new { Name = "Trung.NguyenThe" };? ;) –  Mark Rushakoff Nov 9 '10 at 17:10

4 Answers 4

In Java C# and Ruby, you cannot create variables with a . in the name.

// C# and Java
Object Trung.NguyenThe = "";
# Ruby
Trung.NguyenThe = ""

That variable name is illegal in all three languages.

If you want to do something similar to this, use an underscore _.

// C# and Java
Object Trung_NguyenThe = "";
# Ruby
Trung_NguyenThe = ""
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Ya, thank for your answer. i knew it's illegal to do so, sorry for ambitious question. –  Little Jack Nov 9 '10 at 17:29
    
@Dark, you are welcome. Did you mean 'ambiguous question'? –  jjnguy Nov 9 '10 at 17:30
    
Yes, I fixed it to be clearer. And, can I make class in class in Ruby ? ( as the guys shown me below) –  Little Jack Nov 9 '10 at 17:42
1  
@Dark, yes you can create nested classes in Ruby: brpreiss.com/books/opus8/html/page597.html –  jjnguy Nov 9 '10 at 17:45
    
so it will be myNewMe = Trung::NguyenThe.new ? nice. –  Little Jack Nov 9 '10 at 18:26

First of all, objects do not have names. Classes and variables do.

So I'll assume you're asking about naming classes with periods (based on your last comment)...

The straight answer is "no", but one can emulate that using namespaces/packages or inner classes.

Namespace:

namespace Trung {
    public class NguyenThe {}
}

// Usage:
namespace Whatever {
    public class Client {
        public main() {
            var x = new Trung.NguyenThe();
        }
    }
}

Inner class:

namespace Whatever {
    public class Trung {
        public class NguyenThe {}
    }

    // Usage:
    public class Client {
        public main() {
            var x = new Trung.NguyenThe();
        }
    }
}

(Note: This is C# code, but I'm sure the same could be done in Java. I guess Ruby has the same concepts also.)

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Thank, this's very helpful. –  Little Jack Nov 9 '10 at 17:27
    
Can you do this in Ruby ? –  Little Jack Nov 9 '10 at 17:41
1  
@Dark Cloud: (about Ruby) kind of. You can define class inside a module in ruby, but the ruby syntax for resolving module members uses :: instead of . (that make sense in Ruby; a module is like a static class, and you can use . only to resolve instance/object members). So it would become Trung::NguyenThe() (or Trung::NguyenThe, which is the same in Ruby). –  rsenna Nov 9 '10 at 21:17

In Ruby, there's no such thing as a class name. Classes are just objects like every other object which get assigned to variables just like any other variable.

Trung.NguyenThe is not a legal variable name, therefore this is impossible:

class Object
  klass = Class.new do
    def to_s; 'Hello' end
  end
  const_set :'Trung.NguyenThe', klass
  # NameError: wrong constant name Trung.NguyenThe
end

You could, of course, create an object which responds to a NguyenThe message with a class and assign that object to a variable named Trung, but that's not what you are asking about:

klass = Class.new do
  def to_s; 'Hello' end
end
(Trung = Object.new).define_singleton_method(:NguyenThe) { klass }

puts Trung.NguyenThe.new
# Hello

In C# and Java, periods are illegal in class names as well. C# has an escaping mechanism that allows you to use otherwise reserved words as names, but this mechanism doesn't make it possible to use illegal names, only reserved ones.

There are proposals for more symbolic freedom in Java names, but so far, they have not yet been implemented.

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Sorry, I'm not a real rubist, but I do believe Ruby has class names. Yes, a class is an object, but that doesn't mean it doesn't have an associated name - even if the concept of "name" here be a little bit different than on static languages... You can even dynamically get the class name of any object by calling obj.class.name... Also, the class name is a constant, so it should be immutable. –  rsenna Nov 9 '10 at 21:27
    
Class#name is simply a convenience method for debugging. And in fact, it works by scanning all constants and checking whether the class has been assigned to one of them and returning the name of the constant. In other words: it's just the name of the variable the class has been assigned to. And obviously, this means that the name of a class can change, depending on what variable it is being assigned to: a = Class.new; p a.name; A = a; p a.name. –  Jörg W Mittag Nov 9 '10 at 22:25

Sure. Create a package called Trung. Within this package create a class called NguyenThe.

Or are you assuming that Trung is already a class name?

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