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I am sure this has something to do with IIS but I can't figure it out.

I have a website using forms authentication. When my website tries to access any file resources (javascript files, css, etc), I am redirected to the forms login page set in my web.config. I also get redirected if I just type the address into the address bar.

The web.config entry for forms auth is pretty basic:

<authentication mode="Forms">
  <forms loginUrl="~/Account/LogOn" timeout="2880" />
</authentication>

There are also two location nodes to deny users from other parts of the site:

<location path="n2">
  <system.web>
    <authorization>
      <allow roles="Editors" />
    </authorization>
  </system.web>
</location>
<location path="web.config">
  <system.web>
    <authorization>
      <deny users="*" />
    </authorization>
  </system.web>
</location>

I am using the standard IIS7 install on Windows Server 2008 R2.

Edit So, if I add a random auth cookie (FormsAuthentication.SetAuthCookie()), the resources become available, I know it has to be my authentication model that's messed up somehow. It works on another server (I just copied it over). Any ideas how I can track the problem down?

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Did you ever solve this? Having exactly the same problem. –  starskythehutch Mar 9 '11 at 15:28
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6 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I had the same error, in my case the trick was setting Anonymous Authentication to use the App Pool identity instead of IUSR in IIS

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2  
And for those looking for where to do this: Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager -> Sites -> Default Web Site -> [YourWebSite] -> Authentication -> Anonymous Authentication -> Edit -> Anonymous user identity: Application pool identity –  Nailuj Aug 13 '13 at 12:17
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It's been along time since I did any asp.net forms work but the first questions would be - are you sure your user is a member of the "Editors" role. You can use the Web Site Administration tool to set this up I think? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ssa0wsyf.aspx

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I'm not even trying to browse in the path that is requiring the editors role, but I am positive that I am in it. –  scottm Nov 9 '10 at 17:40
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That is because you have set deny to everyone. In IIS 7, because of the integrated pipeline you will get redirected even when you try to browse CSS or any static page.

Put the static content inside a folder if you like and allow access to it.

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Aren't I only saying that everyone is denied access to the web.config file? Even if I remove those last two location nodes, the same thing happens. –  scottm Nov 9 '10 at 17:10
    
Ohh... apologies for missing that web.config part. Can you try adding extra Allow for anonymous users? <allow users="?" /> –  Rahul Soni Nov 9 '10 at 17:23
    
You can also try with a simple new application and see if you are able to browse static files or not. IF, by chance, even that doesn't work... I would recommend checking if your machine contains an underscore character in its name. –  Rahul Soni Nov 9 '10 at 17:27
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I use allow * for my Content folder. That will prevent any authorization from happening for static content.

  <location path="Content">
    <system.web>
      <authorization>
        <allow users="*" />
      </authorization>
    </system.web>
  </location>

Rick

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I've tried this also, but get the same result. I'm stumped. –  scottm Nov 9 '10 at 19:00
    
Zip your project and send it to me if you want to. rrb at matrix6 dot com. Or, even better, make a smaller test project with only the essentials to get the problem to occur. –  rboarman Nov 10 '10 at 16:57
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Don't use <location> tags in web.config to handle authorization in an ASP.NET MVC application as locations have no longer any sense. All you need in web.config is the authentication tag. In MVC authorization could be achieved by decorating proper controllers and/or actions with the [Authorize] attribute.

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I have a webforms application in a directory inside of my mvc project. Apparently, the locations do make sense, because without the entry for N2, users are not redirected to login. –  scottm Nov 10 '10 at 16:42
1  
I disagree, location tags do have a use in MVC apps. I had to use them to allow anonymous access to two folders of static resources. –  Kev Nov 11 '10 at 10:24
    
I disagree too. I use them for my content folder and for my logon/register pages. –  rboarman Nov 12 '10 at 18:01
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I had exactly the same and found it was because I had forgotten to allow anonymous access to the website from inside IIS! This meant that the FormsAuthentication was always kicking in, even for the static resources that were not protected.

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