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compiling with GCC i get always false from the following code. I believe this is a compiler bug, but someone may know better.

#include <iostream>


template< class T > 
class has_apply { 

  typedef char yes[1];
  typedef char no[2];

  template< class U, U u > 
  struct binder {};

  template< class U, unsigned n >
  static yes& test( U*,
                        binder< void (U::*) ( const double& ),
                            &U::template apply< n >
                          >* = 0
                  );

  template< class U, unsigned n >
  static no& test( ... );

public:

  static const bool result =
         ( sizeof( yes ) == sizeof( test< T, 0u >( (T*)(0) ) ) );

}; 

class A {
public:
    template< unsigned n >
    void apply( const double& );

};

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::boolalpha << has_apply< A >::result << '\n';
  return( 0 );
}
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2  
Any chance you could simplify the code? (I'm pretty sure you don't need all 7 of the yes templates to demonstrate the problem.) Or at least add some comments? –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 9 '10 at 17:08
    
I have added the 6 tests to cover all possibilities, but the one left by Oli Charlesworth should be enough to produce "true". –  Elias Nov 9 '10 at 17:48
    
Yes, I took a gamble that only this one is relevant. Please feel free to edit as appropriate! –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 9 '10 at 17:51
    
An answer by Andy Venikov may already be available in [comp.lang.c++.moderated] in the thread "Re: Why the following SFINAE test does not work?". Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 9 '10 at 19:55

4 Answers 4

I can't claim to understand why, but I was able to make your code work by not taking U* and by pulling the declaration of the binder type out:

template< class T > 
class has_apply { 

public:
  typedef char yes[1];
  typedef char no[2];

  template< class U, U u > 
  struct binder {};
  typedef binder< void (T::*)(const double&), &T::template apply<0u> > b;

  template < typename V, unsigned n >
  struct declare
  {
    typedef binder< void (V::*)(const double&), &V::template apply<n> > type;
  };

  template< typename U, unsigned n >
  static yes& test( typename declare<U,n>::type * );

  template< class U, unsigned n >
  static no& test( ... );


  static const bool result =
         ( sizeof( yes ) == sizeof( test< T, 0u >( 0 ) ) );

}; 

You can actually simplify this a bit by removing the unsigned parameter from the function and just sticking 0u in the typedef within 'declare'.

Again, I can't explain why this intermediate metafunction is necessary but it was required and the above works in MSVC++ 2010

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+1 for something that works with MSVC. I also tried it with g++ 4.4.1, but g++ says "x.cpp: In static member function 'static char (& has_apply<T>::test(typename has_apply<T>::declare<U, n>::type*))[1]': x.cpp:21: error: 'yep' was not declared in this scope". So, not complete -- and I don't understand the behavior of the compilers. Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 9 '10 at 19:21
    
Oh, oops. You have to delete the body of the yes test. I'll edit to do that. Part of the code I used to figure out WTF. –  Crazy Eddie Nov 9 '10 at 19:23
    
update: I added definition of yep, then it compiled both MSVC and g++. But then I added extra arg to apply to check for false result, and then it didn't compile with either compiler. :-( Have you more magic? Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 9 '10 at 19:25
    
I assume the typedef for b is not needed, right? However, even though the code results "true", try changing const double& to double& and you get an compilation error, not "false". At least with gcc 4.5 –  Elias Nov 9 '10 at 19:37

Andy Venikov's answer over in [comp.lang.c++.moderated] (I'm only taking credit for great google-foo (he he, I cheated)):

http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c++.moderated/msg/93017cf706e08c9e

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That doesn't quite answer the question of why it doesn't work. Notice that the guys over there also do not know why the result is not the one I expected. –  Elias Nov 13 '10 at 15:51
    
@Elias: I didn't fully grok Andy's answer (hence, only link to it), but he hinted about constant expression context. The closest I can find is C++98 §5.19/4 "An expression that designates the address of a member or base class of a non-POD class object (clause 9) is not an address constant expression". But I can't see why the member function template should make the A class non-POD. When I checked this, earlier, as I recall (suitably adapted) code worked nicely with non-template member. OK, this probably doesn't help you directly. Just yet another data point... Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 13 '10 at 16:10
    
If you look at the thread now, you will see that it has bee recognized that Andy's reasoning in his first post is actually wrong. Before that, I prefered to remain silent, but wasn't really convinced of his answer as well. The links he provided were valuable though. –  Elias Nov 13 '10 at 19:07

Like Noah I don't know why. Unlike Noah I didn't find a workable solution, but investigating the thing I managed to crash the MingW g++ 4.4.1 compiler (that is, an Internal Compiler Error). This was simply by inconsistently referring to apply as template and non-template:

#include <iostream>


template< class T > 
class has_apply { 
  template< class U, U u > 
  struct binder {};

  template< class U >
  static double test(
    U*,
    binder<
        void (U::*) ( const double& ),
        //&U::template apply< 0 >
        &U::apply
      >* = 0
  );

public:

    static binder<
        void (T::*) ( const double& ),
        &T::template apply< 0 >
      >* dummy();

    static const bool result = sizeof( test( (T*)(0), dummy() ) );
};

class A {
public:
//    template< unsigned n >
    void apply( const double& );

};

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::boolalpha << has_apply< A >::result << '\n';
  return( 0 );
}

Effect on g++:

C:\test> g++ -std=c++98 y.cpp
y.cpp: In instantiation of 'has_apply':
y.cpp:38:   instantiated from here
y.cpp:24: internal compiler error: in instantiate_type, at cp/class.c:6303
Please submit a full bug report,
with preprocessed source if appropriate.
See  for instructions.

C:\test> _

He he...

PS: I'd love to post this as a "comment", since it's not an "answer".

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This is not an answer to why it doesn't work. However, researching through the web, I've found some examples and eventually got to the following code, which may be even more to the point then what I've been trying.

I was trying to detect an specific member function signature, but the code below goes beyond and detects whether a given call is possible, no matter what is the signature. Hope the comments will be helpful.

#include <iostream>

template< class T >
class has_apply {

  class yes { char c; };
  class no { yes c[2]; };

  struct mixin {
void apply( void );
  };

  // Calling derived::apply is only non-ambiguous if
  // T::apply does not exist, cf. 10.2.2.
  template< class U> struct derived : public U, public mixin {};

  // The following template will help on deduction based on this fact.
  // If U is type void (mixin::*) (void) then the template can be
  // instantiated with u = &derived< U >::apply if and only if T::apply
  // does not exist.
  template< class U, U u >
  class binder {};

  // Therefore, the following template function is only selected if there
  // is no T::apply:
  template< class U >
  static no  deduce( U, binder< void (mixin::*) (void), &derived< U >::apply >* = 0 );
  // Selected otherwise.
  static yes deduce( ... );

  // Provides an T object:
  static T T_obj( void );

public:

  static const bool result = ( sizeof( yes ) == sizeof( deduce( T_obj() ) ) );

};

namespace aux {

// Class to represent the void type as a "true" type.
class void_type {};

// deduce() some lines below will give us the right answer based on
// the return type of T::apply<>, but if it is void we cannot use a
// call to T::apply as an argument to deduce. In fact, the only
// function in c++ that can take such an argument is operator,() with
// its default behaviour and if an overload is not well formed it
// falls back to default.
template< class T >
T& operator,( const T&, void_type ) {};

// Copies the constness of T into U. This will be required in order
// to not get false positives when no const member is defined.
template< class T, class U >
struct copy_constness {
  typedef U result;
};
template< class T, class U >
struct copy_constness< const T, U > {
  typedef const U result;
};
}

template< class T >
class has_correct_apply{

  class yes { char c; };
  class no { yes c[2]; };

  // We assume has_apply< T >::result is true so the following class
  // is well declared. It is declared in a way such that a call to
  // derived::apply< n >() is always possible. This will be necessary
  // later.
  struct derived : public T {
using T::apply; // possible iff has_apply< T >::result == true
// This template function will be selected if the function call
// we wish is otherwise invalid.
template< unsigned n >
static no apply( ... );
  };

  // const_correct_derived will have the same constness than T.
  typedef typename aux::copy_constness< T, derived >::result const_correct_derived;
  // Provides a const correct derived object.
  static const_correct_derived derived_obj( void );

  // Only possible call was derived::apply: call is impossible for signature:
  static no  deduce( no );
  // Since te returned value of it will most likely  be
  // ignored in our code (void must be always [almost, see next]
  // ignored anyway), we return yes from this:
  static yes deduce( ... );
  // As we noticed, an overload of operator,() may make an exact match necessary.
  // If we want this we could simply have used "no" instead of "yes" above and:
//   static no  deduce( aux::void_type );


public:

  static const bool result = ( sizeof( yes ) == sizeof( deduce(
( derived_obj().template apply< 0u >( 0.0 ), aux::void_type() )
  ) ) );

  // Note: Inteestingly enough, GCC does not detect an private subclass default
  // constructor and so const_correct_derived() could be used instead of
  // having a function derived_obj(), but I do not know if this behavoiur is
  // standard or not.

};


struct C {
  template< unsigned n >
  int apply( double, unsigned m = 10 ) const;
private:
  C();
};

struct D {
  template< unsigned n >
  int apply( const double& );
private:
  D();
};

struct E : public C {
};

struct Without{};

#include "mp.h"

int main()
{
  std::cout << has_apply< E >::result << '\n';
  std::cout << has_correct_apply< const E >::result << '\n';
  std::cout << has_correct_apply< const D >::result << '\n';
  std::cout << has_correct_apply< D >::result << '\n';
//   E e;

  return( 0 );
}
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