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Example:

If i have a table of things and their owners.

I can do either or to get the same result for a natural join:

SELECT * FROM owners, things WHERE owners.id = things.owner_id
SELECT * FROM owners JOIN things ON owners.id = things.owner_id

Now if I wanted to do a left join? Like so, where all owners are returned...

SELECT * FROM owners LEFT JOIN things ON owners.id = things.owner_id

IS it possible to rewrite any kind of join as a set of WHERE conditions?

Thanks

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4 Answers

An INNER JOIN can always be rewritten as implicit join.

An OUTER JOIN can sometimes be rewritten with proprietary clauses line (+) in Oracle, * in SQL Server etc., but not always.

Also, an OUTER JOIN can be rewritten using UNION ALL and subqueries:

SELECT  *
FROM    a
FULL JOIN
        b
ON      some_condition(a, b)

is the same as

SELECT  *
FROM    a, b
WHERE   some_condition(a, b)
UNION ALL
SELECT  a.*, NULL, NULL, …, NULL
FROM    a
WHERE   NOT EXISTS
        (
        SELECT  NULL
        FROM    b
        WHERE   some_condition(a, b)
        )
UNION ALL
SELECT  NULL, NULL, …, NULL, b.*
FROM    b
WHERE   NOT EXISTS
        (
        SELECT  NULL
        FROM    a
        WHERE   some_condition(a, b)
        )

This used to be a workaround for Oracle and PostgreSQL which did not support ANSI syntax in earlier versions, and also is a workaround for MySQL which does not support FULL JOIN

You should use ANSI OUTER JOIN syntax if your database supports it.

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You can't do a cartesian as a WHERE clause either, right? –  JNK Nov 9 '10 at 17:29
    
And conversely, just because you can put WHERE conditions in an ON clause does not mean you should. Use ON clauses for JOIN purposes and WHERE clauses for filter purposes. –  RedFilter Nov 9 '10 at 17:31
1  
JNK: yes, you can. WHERE 1 = 1. –  Quassnoi Nov 9 '10 at 17:31
    
@jnk accidental cartesion joins are the biggest problem of using implicit joins. It is really easy to miss one condition of a group of several and get a cross product but the explicit join would not have passed the syntax check if you miss a join condition. –  HLGEM Nov 9 '10 at 20:37
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Depends on what database, and if their deprecated outer join syntax is still supported. JOINs criteria in the WHERE clause is ANSI-89 syntax, but as you've noticed -- there's no OUTER join support, so vendors implemented their own.

Oracle:

SELECT * 
  FROM owners, things 
 WHERE owners.id = things.owner_id(+)

SQL Server:

SELECT * 
  FROM owners, things 
 WHERE owners.id =* things.owner_id

Recommendation

Don't - use ANSI-92 syntax. It's portable, and there's no syntax on the horizon to replace it:

   SELECT * 
     FROM owners o
LEFT JOIN things t ON o.id = t.owner_id
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*= is deprecated in SQL Server of course –  gbn Nov 9 '10 at 17:39
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As far as your LEFT JOIN example, yes, you could express that in the WHERE clause, depending on the flavor and version of SQL.

Multiple conditions for a single JOIN can't be expressed in a WHERE clause in certain cases when using a LEFT JOIN (and certain other joins).

In general, using ANSI join syntax as opposed to Theta ("WHERE clause") syntax is generally considered a best practice.

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Of course you would not want to use the implicit syntax ever (it is a very poor programming technique that is subject to error and creates maintenance problems), so why would you want to write left joins this way?

I can't speak for all databases, but the implicit left join syntax in SQL Server is deprecated and should not be used in any event as it is not guaranteed to give correct results. I have seen problems with the results if you combine the explicit join syntax for left joins with the implicit join syntax, so if you need a left join, then fix all the joins to be explicit.

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