Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to find out if a url variable exists, and if it doesn't, make sure that it's not empty.

This does not work:

<cfif IsDefined('URL.affiliateId') and is not "">
    //
</cfif>
share|improve this question
2  
All answers below work, but FYI structKeyExists() is more efficient then isDefined(), and len() is more efficient then NEQ "". Trim() is optional but not a bad idea to include that. – Henry Nov 9 '10 at 19:27
    
I think a better reason to use structKeyExists() is accuracy. IsDefined() has a slightly broader scope, which may occasionally lead to unexpected results. – Leigh Nov 9 '10 at 21:44
up vote 13 down vote accepted
<cfif structKeyExists(url, 'affiliateID') and trim(url.affiliateID) neq "">...</cfif>
share|improve this answer
    
good point on the trim, Leigh. Forgot to include that! – scrittler Nov 9 '10 at 18:13
    
Ah, much better. (I am always amazed how many ways you can write this kind of thing ;-) – Leigh Nov 9 '10 at 18:29
2  
Also it's been proven the sturctKeyExists is more efficient than IsDefined. – Stefano D Nov 10 '10 at 19:32
    
Just so you know why StructKeyExists is more efficient; StructKeyExists() looks for a single variable in a single structure. isDefined() will scan every scope in a prescribed order until it find the variable, even if you specify the scope for the variable in the function call. eg. isDefined("session.userid") will still scan the variables, URL, Form etc scopes until it finds it in the session scope. – Stephen Moretti Nov 11 '10 at 9:21

You can simplify the logic a bit as well by using <cfparam> to ensure that the URL variable always exists. Then rather than having 2 conditions, you just need 1.

<cfparam name="URL.affiliateId" type="string" default="" />

<cfif trim( URL.affiliateId ) is not "">
     do stuff here
</cfif>
share|improve this answer
    
True. If the variable's existence does not negatively effect existing code (I was not sure), then cfparam can simplify things – Leigh Nov 9 '10 at 18:48

To ignore most white space

<cfif IsDefined('URL.affiliateId') and len(trim(URL.affiliateId))>
    value is defined and not empty
</cfif>

... or alternately

<cfif IsDefined('URL.affiliateId') and len(trim(URL.affiliateId)) gt 0>
    value is defined and not empty
</cfif>
share|improve this answer
<cfif IsDefined('URL.affiliateId') and URL.affiliateId neq "">
    //
</cfif>
share|improve this answer
    
You do not need the # signs. – Leigh Nov 9 '10 at 18:07
1  
As Leigh says: no #'s are requires, plus if you know the scope and variable name you should always use structkeyexists() as shown by scrittler – Stephen Moretti Nov 9 '10 at 18:15
    
yeah I know that #s are required, it's just one of those habits. – Harrison Nov 9 '10 at 18:24
    
Good point about structKeyExists(). Either works, but it is a bit more precise. – Leigh Nov 9 '10 at 18:25
    
I think they have a CF support group for that .. ;) – Leigh Nov 9 '10 at 18:28

I will just sum up the answers and offer my version of it:

<cfparam name="URL.affiliateId" type="string" default="" />

<cfif len(trim(URL.affiliateId))>
     ...do something with the affiliate...
</cfif>

You do not need structKeyExists or isDefined and it would be better to avoid them. Also you do not need the 'greater than zero' part after the 'len()'.

share|improve this answer
2  
No there are perfectly valid use cases for all of the above. Personal preference, on the other hand, is a different matter. – Leigh Nov 10 '10 at 12:21
    
Yes, they are valid but not needed. – Uphill_ What '1 Nov 11 '10 at 7:22
1  
While there are similarities in behavior, there are also differences. So a blanket statement that they are never needed is inaccurate. They do not all provide identical functionality. – Leigh Nov 11 '10 at 14:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.