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I would like several textboxes to react to changes of an underlying string. So if I were to change the content of the string, all those textboxes would change their content too.

Now, I can't use the String type for that as it is immutable. So I went with StringBuilder. But the Text property of a TextBox object only takes String.

Is there an easy way to "bind" the StringBuilder object to the Text property of a TextBox?

Many thanks!

PS: The TextBox is currently WPF. But I might switch to Windows Forms because of Mono.

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Winforms or WPF? –  Ray Booysen Jan 5 '09 at 16:31
    
PS: The TextBox is currently WPF. But I might switch to Windows Forms because of Mono. –  user51710 Jan 5 '09 at 16:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could always expose a property that's getter returns the ToString() of the Stringbuilder. The form could then bind to this property.

private StringBuilder _myStringBuilder;

public string MyText
{
  get { return _myStringBuilder.ToString(); }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answers Ray. But I would still have to manually assign MyText to textbox.Text, wouldn't I? What I am looking for is a construct in which all participants share the same memory location. –  user51710 Jan 5 '09 at 16:45
1  
If you're using WPF, the TextBox would look like this <TextBox Text="{Binding Path=MyText}" /> and the binding would take care of this for you., –  Ray Booysen Jan 5 '09 at 16:47
    
If the textboxes are bound to the property via the above syntax, WPF will handle all the binding for you. As long as you cater for any changes to the StringBuilder by calling NotifyPropertyChanged("MyText) in the case of INotifyPropertyChanged, all would be well. –  Ray Booysen Jan 5 '09 at 16:48
    
With those hints I should be able to create the binding. Thany you. I was looking/hoping for a way to do it without event handling but just now realized that that is not possible, because at some point the textbox has to be notified that it needs to repaint. –  user51710 Jan 5 '09 at 17:04
    
By the way. Looking at your description: What if I wanted to bind and unbind datasources to and from controls and even add new controls with a respective binding at runtime. I was looking for textBox1.DataBinding.Add(...) but IntelliSense did not know that. Any idea? –  user51710 Jan 5 '09 at 17:08

It seems my previous answer wasn't worded very well, as many people misunderstood the point I was making, so I will try again taking into account people's comments.

Just because a String object is immutable does not mean that a variable of type String cannot be changed. If an object has a property of type String, then assigning a new String object to that property causes the property to change (in my original answer, I referred to this as the variable mutating, apparently some people do not agree with using the term "mutate" in this context).

The WPF databinding system can bind to this property. If it is notified that the property changes through INotifyPropertyChanged, then it will update the target of the binding, thus allowing many textboxes to bind to the same property and all change on an update of the property without requiring any additional code.

Therefore, there is no need to use StringBuilder as the backing store for the property. Instead, you can use a standard String property and implement INotifyPropertyChanged.

public class MyClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private string myString;

    public string MyString
    {
        get
        { return myString; }
        set
        {
            myString = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("MyString");
        }
    }

    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        var handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        { handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName)); }
    }

    #region INotifyPropertyChanged Members

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    #endregion
}

WPF can bind to this and will automatically pick up and changes made in the value of the property. No, the String object has not mutated, but the String property has mutated (or changed, if you prefer).

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A good complete answer +1 –  Sam Meldrum Jan 6 '09 at 11:00

You could inherit the text box and override the Text property to retrieve and write to the string builder.

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I would still have to issue and handle notifications in case of a change to the underlying StringBuilder, wouldn't I? –  user51710 Jan 5 '09 at 16:59

Simply put, no. Text property only takes a String. So whatever the source, you'll have to convert it to a String.

To enable you to easily set it once for many textboxes, you can have a class property that always sets all textbox values...

public string MyString
{
  get
  {
   ///... 
  }
  set 
  {
    textbox1.Text = value;
    textbox2.Text = value;
    //...
  }
}
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I think the posted was looking for a way to bind data and not have a concrete list of textboxes to update. :) –  Ray Booysen Jan 5 '09 at 16:37
    
@Ray, I know what you mean, but he's looking for a way to update multiple controls at once... and this is one way. –  Kon Jan 5 '09 at 16:42

I would wrap the StringBuilder in a custom class with an Add method, Text method, and an OnChanged event.

Wire up the Add method such that when it is called it adds the text to the StringBuilder instance and fires the event. Then when the event fires, use the Text method to do a ToString on the StringBuilder.

public class StringBuilderWrapper
{
   private StringBuilder _builder = new StringBuilder();
   private EventHandler<EventArgs> TextChanged;
   public void Add(string text)
   {
     _builder.Append(text);
     if (TextChanged != null)
       TextChanged(this, null);
   }
   public string Text
   {
     get { return _builder.ToString(); }
   }
}
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You can bind the Text property of a TextBox to a string property... The String object is immutable, but a variable of type String is perfectly mutable...

string mutable = "I can be changed";
mutable = "see?";

You would need to wrap it up in an object that implements INotifyPropertyChanged, however.

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3  
A string object is not mutable. When modifying a string like you've just done, what really occurs is a new string is created. –  Ray Booysen Jan 5 '09 at 16:36
    
@Ray: I was just about to say that :) –  CMS Jan 5 '09 at 16:37
    
+1 for Ray. String is most definitely immutable. Every String/string assignment allocates new space in memory. –  Kon Jan 5 '09 at 16:40
    
string being immutable doesn't stop you binding to a property of an object that is of type string. This would be the usual way to do this. –  Sam Meldrum Jan 5 '09 at 16:43
    
@Sam, Giraffe didn't address binding at all. He's incorrectly talking about string mutability (is that a word?). –  Kon Jan 5 '09 at 16:45

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