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In response to .. some other question somewhere, I wrote this code.

struct no_type{};
template<typename T> struct has_apply {
    static decltype(T().apply<0u>(double())) func( T* ptr );
    static no_type func( ... );
    static const bool result = !std::is_same<no_type, decltype(func(nullptr))>::value;
};

class A {
public:
    template< unsigned n >
    void apply( const double& );

};
class B {
};

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::boolalpha << has_apply< A >::result << '\n';
  std::cout << std::boolalpha << has_apply< B >::result << '\n';
  std::cin.get();
  return( 0 );
}

Now it seems to me that result should be true if T offers a non-static member function "apply" that accepts a double rvalue and a template parameter literal, and false otherwise. However, the example given actually fails to compile for class B, when compiling has_apply<B>. Shouldn't the fact that the substitution of T failed in the decltype statement mean that it simply calls the other func? Isn't that kind of the point of SFINAE?

Solved in the most ridiculous, pointless fashion ever:

struct no_type{};
template<typename T> struct has_apply {
    template<typename U> static decltype(U().apply<0u>(double())) func( U* );
    template<typename U> static no_type func( ... );
    static const bool result = !std::is_same<no_type, decltype(func<T>(nullptr))>::value;
};

class A {
public:
    template< unsigned n >
    void apply( const double& );

};
class B {
};

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::boolalpha << has_apply< A >::result << '\n';
  std::cout << std::boolalpha << has_apply< B >::result << '\n';
  std::cin.get();
  return( 0 );
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

SFINAE applies when substitution fails for a function template's template parameter, not for a class template's template parameter that has the (non-template) function in question as a member, as is in your case.

After fixing that, you should at least change decltype(T().apply<0u>(double())) to decltype(T().template apply<0u>(double())) because T() expression is of a dependent type. The reason for that is this: when the compiler first sees T().apply<0u>, it doesn't know anything about T yet, so how should it parse the tokens apply and < after .? apply might be a member template, and then < would start the argument list for it. OTOH apply might instead be a non-template member (e.g. a data member), and then < would be parsed as 'less-than' operator. There is an ambiguity, and it's still too early for the compiler to resolve that at this point. There is a need for a disambiguation mechanism a programmer could use to tell the compiler what apply is expected to be: a template or not. And here comes the .template (or ->template, or ::template) construct to the rescue: if it's present, the compiler knows it should be a template member, otherwise if it's not present then the compiler knows the member shouldn't be a template.

Finally here's an example I created that works correctly and produces the desired results on g++ 4.5.0 with -std=c++0x:

#include <iostream>

template < class T >
decltype( T().template apply< 0u >( double() ) ) f( T &t )
{
    return t.template apply< 0u >( 5. );
}

const char *f( ... )
{
    return "no apply<>";
}

class A {
public:
    template < unsigned >
    int apply( double d )
    {
        return d + 10.;
    }
};

class B {};

int main()
{
    A a;
    std::cout << f( a ) << std::endl;
    B b;
    std::cout << f( b ) << std::endl;
}

Output is:

15
no apply<>

Now if you remove both .template from the first f() definition, then the output becomes:

no apply<>
no apply<>

Which is to indicate substitution failure for class A as it doesn't have any non-template member named apply. SFINAE in action!

share|improve this answer
    
You should also use declval<T>() instead of T() in case T doesn't have a default constructor. VS2010 doesn't have it but it can be made: stackoverflow.com/questions/2638843/… –  Crazy Eddie Nov 9 '10 at 18:45
    
@Noah Roberts: That's right! That is part of why I said 'at least' above ;) –  usta Nov 9 '10 at 18:49
    
@usta: I still don't get it. T is not a dependent type, it is the template type. If you make a member variable of type T, you don't say typename T t;, which you do for dependent types. –  Puppy Nov 9 '10 at 18:54
    
@DeadMG: Please note that the need to add template after . is not the biggest issue here. The fact that SFINAE concerns itself only with function templates and their parameters is the main thing. Anyway, an object of type T (such as T()) is an object of dependent type (a type that depends on a template parameter), so one needs to say .template to access a member template of that object. –  usta Nov 9 '10 at 19:14
    
@DeadMG: Please see if my edited answer is clearer on that point. –  usta Nov 9 '10 at 19:29

Sorry for posting as an answer, but comments seem to be diasbled for me.

I have seen people commenting on declval(), but it is not needed. Instead of T(), one may simply write

 decltype( *(T*)0->template apply< 0u >( double() ) ) )

which works, since it appears only inside decltype and is not actually evaluated at runtime. Another option would be to declare

T T_obj( void );

and then use

decltype( T_obj().template apply< 0u >( double() ) ) )

As a side comment, I recall reading that Stroustrup designed the language because he did not want to do a job with the wrong tools. Isn't C++ the wrong language for metaprogramming?

While c++0x improves things quite a bit, this does not seem to be the focus. Is there any other language as "close to metal" as c++ that provides better tools for writing metacode that will generate code at compile-time?

share|improve this answer
    
The best you can get apart from C++ is maybe D. –  Puppy Nov 14 '10 at 17:51
    
declval isn't strictly necessary as you correctly point out, and people have been doing without it out for many years now. But then std::move isn't strictly necessary either, as static_cast-ing to the appropriate rvalue reference type would achieve the same effect. They are just convenient means to express things. And convenience does matter if you ask me. It is possible that after some years people would react with "Huh?!" when seeing something like *(T*)0, because declval is nicer. –  usta Nov 14 '10 at 21:09
    
And you should have written ((T*)0)->template or (*(T*)0).template instead of *(T*)0->template. Another point in favor of declval :) . –  usta Nov 14 '10 at 21:11
    
Sure. declval is certainly better, but my point was just to point out techniques that are alerady standard. In fact, decltype is not required here as well. –  Elias Nov 16 '10 at 0:24
    
This should be important if one is serious about deadlines, unlike the committee :) Of course c++0x improves things, but is there anything fundamentally new? I feel uncanny about the fact that the only mechanism allowing compile-time introspection is still SFINAE, which was not designed to that end: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Substitution_failure_is_not_an_error It itched when I read the autors "Generative Programming" stating that metaprogramming should be for library designers only, even though I'm one of them. –  Elias Nov 16 '10 at 0:39

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