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I am looking for a pattern, algorithm, or library that will take a set of dates and return a description of the recurrence if one exits, i.e. the set [11-01-2010, 11-08-2010, 11-15-2010, 11-22-2010, 11-29-2010] would yield something like "Every Monday in November".

Has anyone seen anything like this before or have any suggestions on the best way to implement it?

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1  
How complexe can be your recurrence ? –  Loïc Février Nov 9 '10 at 19:03
    
sounds like a very unusual and very interesting task for some programming course. (I'm going to teach java soon and I'm thinking about including your 'problem' to the assignments set). +1. –  Roman Nov 9 '10 at 21:38
    
Have a look at the answer I recieved to a (somewhat) similar question; could be applicable in your case as well: stackoverflow.com/questions/3165867/… –  DanP Nov 9 '10 at 23:02
    
Are there multiple recurrences in the sequence [for example every monday and every 2th tuesday]? –  monksy Nov 13 '10 at 21:41
1  
This is a great question; really makes you wonder why something like this doesn't exist already –  DanP Nov 17 '10 at 22:57

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted
+100

Grammatical Evolution (GE) is suitable for this kind of problem, because you are searching for an answer that adheres to a certain language. Grammatical Evolution is also used for program generation, composing music, designing, etcetera.

I'd approach the task like this:

Structure the problem space with a grammar.

Construct a Context-free Grammar that can represent all desired recurrence patterns. Consider production rules like these:

datepattern -> datepattern 'and' datepattern
datepattern -> frequency bounds
frequency -> 'every' ordinal weekday 'of the month'
frequency -> 'every' weekday
ordinal -> ordinal 'and' ordinal
ordinal -> 'first' | 'second' | 'third'
bounds -> 'in the year' year

An example of a pattern generated by these rules is: 'every second and third wednesday of the month in the year 2010 and every tuesday in the year 2011'

One way to implement such a grammar would be through a class hierarchy that you will later operate on through reflection, as I've done in the example below.

Map this language to a set of dates

You should create a function that takes a clause from your language and recursively returns the set of all dates covered by it. This allows you to compare your answers to the input.

Guided by the grammar, search for potential solutions

You could use a Genetic algorithm or Simulated Annealing to match the dates to the grammar, try your luck with Dynamic Programming or start simple with a brute force enumeration of all possible clauses.

Should you go with a Genetic Algorithm, your mutation concept should consist of substituting an expression for another one based on the application of one of your production rules.

Have a look at the following GE-related sites for code and information: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/~eep201/jge/
http://nohejl.name/age/
http://www.geneticprogramming.us/Home_Page.html

Evaluate each solution

The fitness function could take into account the textual length of the solution, the number of dates generated more than once, the number of dates missed, as well as the number of wrong dates generated.

Example code

By request, and because it's such an interesting challenge, I've written a rudimentary implementation of the algorithm to get you started. Although it works it is by no means finished, the design should definitively get some more thought, and once you have gleaned the fundamental take-aways from this example I recommend you consider using one the libraries I've mentioned above.

  /// <summary>
  ///  This is a very basic example implementation of a grammatical evolution algorithm for formulating a recurrence pattern in a set of dates.
  ///  It needs significant extensions and optimizations to be useful in a production setting.
  /// </summary>
  static class Program
  {

    #region "Class hierarchy that codifies the grammar"

    class DatePattern
    {

      public Frequency frequency;
      public Bounds bounds;

      public override string ToString() { return "" + frequency + " " + bounds; }

      public IEnumerable<DateTime> Dates()
      {
        return frequency == null ? new DateTime[] { } : frequency.FilterDates(bounds.GetDates());
      }

    }

    abstract class Bounds
    {
      public abstract IEnumerable<DateTime> GetDates();
    }

    class YearBounds : Bounds
    {

      /* in the year .. */
      public int year;

      public override string ToString() { return "in the year " + year; }

      public override IEnumerable<DateTime> GetDates()
      {
        var firstDayOfYear = new DateTime(year, 1, 1);
        return Enumerable.Range(0, new DateTime(year, 12, 31).DayOfYear)
          .Select(dayOfYear => firstDayOfYear.AddDays(dayOfYear));
      }
    }

    abstract class Frequency
    {
      public abstract IEnumerable<DateTime> FilterDates(IEnumerable<DateTime> Dates);
    }

    class WeeklyFrequency : Frequency
    {

      /* every .. */
      public DayOfWeek dayOfWeek;

      public override string ToString() { return "every " + dayOfWeek; }

      public override IEnumerable<DateTime> FilterDates(IEnumerable<DateTime> Dates)
      {
        return Dates.Where(date => (date.DayOfWeek == dayOfWeek));
      }

    }

    class MonthlyFrequency : Frequency
    {

      /* every .. */
      public Ordinal ordinal;
      public DayOfWeek dayOfWeek;
      /* .. of the month */

      public override string ToString() { return "every " + ordinal + " " + dayOfWeek + " of the month"; }

      public override IEnumerable<DateTime> FilterDates(IEnumerable<DateTime> Dates)
      {
        return Dates.Where(date => (date.DayOfWeek == dayOfWeek) && (int)ordinal == (date.Day - 1) / 7);
      }

    }

    enum Ordinal { First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth }

    #endregion

    static Random random = new Random();
    const double MUTATION_RATE = 0.3;
    static Dictionary<Type, Type[]> subtypes = new Dictionary<Type, Type[]>();

    static void Main()
    {

      // The input signifies the recurrence 'every first thursday of the month in 2010':
      var input = new DateTime[] {new DateTime(2010,12,2), new DateTime(2010,11,4),new DateTime(2010,10,7),new DateTime(2010,9,2),
                    new DateTime(2010,8,5),new DateTime(2010,7,1),new DateTime(2010,6,3),new DateTime(2010,5,6),
                    new DateTime(2010,4,1),new DateTime(2010,3,4),new DateTime(2010,2,4),new DateTime(2010,1,7) };


      for (int cTests = 0; cTests < 20; cTests++)
      {
        // Initialize with a random population
        int treesize = 0;
        var population = new DatePattern[] { (DatePattern)Generate(typeof(DatePattern), ref treesize), (DatePattern)Generate(typeof(DatePattern), ref treesize), (DatePattern)Generate(typeof(DatePattern), ref treesize) };
        Run(input, new List<DatePattern>(population));
      }
    }

    private static void Run(DateTime[] input, List<DatePattern> population)
    {
      var strongest = population[0];
      int strongestFitness = int.MinValue;
      int bestTry = int.MaxValue;
      for (int cGenerations = 0; cGenerations < 300 && strongestFitness < -100; cGenerations++)
      {
        // Select the best individuals to survive:
        var survivers = population
            .Select(individual => new { Fitness = Fitness(input, individual), individual })
            .OrderByDescending(pair => pair.Fitness)
            .Take(5)
            .Select(pair => pair.individual)
            .ToArray();
        population.Clear();

        // The survivers are the foundation for the next generation:
        foreach (var parent in survivers)
        {
          for (int cChildren = 0; cChildren < 3; cChildren++)
          {
            int treeSize = 1;
            DatePattern child = (DatePattern)Mutate(parent, ref treeSize); // NB: procreation may also be done through crossover.
            population.Add((DatePattern)child);

            var childFitness = Fitness(input, child);
            if (childFitness > strongestFitness)
            {
              bestTry = cGenerations;
              strongestFitness = childFitness;
              strongest = child;
            }

          }
        }
      }
      Trace.WriteLine("Found best match with fitness " + Fitness(input, strongest) + " after " + bestTry + " generations: " + strongest);

    }

    private static object Mutate(object original, ref int treeSize)
    {
      treeSize = 0;


      object replacement = Construct(original.GetType());
      foreach (var field in original.GetType().GetFields())
      {
        object newFieldValue = field.GetValue(original);
        int subtreeSize;
        if (field.FieldType.IsEnum)
        {
          subtreeSize = 1;
          if (random.NextDouble() <= MUTATION_RATE)
            newFieldValue = ConstructRandomEnumValue(field.FieldType);
        }
        else if (field.FieldType == typeof(int))
        {
          subtreeSize = 1;
          if (random.NextDouble() <= MUTATION_RATE)
            newFieldValue = (random.Next(2) == 0
            ? Math.Min(int.MaxValue - 1, (int)newFieldValue) + 1
            : Math.Max(int.MinValue + 1, (int)newFieldValue) - 1);
        }
        else
        {
          subtreeSize = 0;
          newFieldValue = Mutate(field.GetValue(original), ref subtreeSize); // mutate pre-maturely to find out subtreeSize

          if (random.NextDouble() <= MUTATION_RATE / subtreeSize) // makes high-level nodes mutate less.
          {
            subtreeSize = 0; // init so we can track the size of the subtree soon to be made.
            newFieldValue = Generate(field.FieldType, ref subtreeSize);
          }
        }
        field.SetValue(replacement, newFieldValue);
        treeSize += subtreeSize;
      }
      return replacement;

    }

    private static object ConstructRandomEnumValue(Type type)
    {
      var vals = type.GetEnumValues();
      return vals.GetValue(random.Next(vals.Length));
    }

    private static object Construct(Type type)
    {
      return type.GetConstructor(new Type[] { }).Invoke(new object[] { });
    }

    private static object Generate(Type type, ref int treesize)
    {
      if (type.IsEnum)
      {
        return ConstructRandomEnumValue(type);
      }
      else if (typeof(int) == type)
      {
        return random.Next(10) + 2005;
      }
      else
      {
        if (type.IsAbstract)
        {
          // pick one of the concrete subtypes:
          var subtypes = GetConcreteSubtypes(type);
          type = subtypes[random.Next(subtypes.Length)];
        }
        object newobj = Construct(type);

        foreach (var field in type.GetFields())
        {
          treesize++;
          field.SetValue(newobj, Generate(field.FieldType, ref treesize));
        }
        return newobj;
      }
    }


    private static int Fitness(DateTime[] input, DatePattern individual)
    {
      var output = individual.Dates().ToArray();
      var avgDateDiff = Math.Abs((output.Average(d => d.Ticks / (24.0 * 60 * 60 * 10000000)) - input.Average(d => d.Ticks / (24.0 * 60 * 60 * 10000000))));
      return
        -individual.ToString().Length // succinct patterns are preferred.
        - input.Except(output).Count() * 300 // Forgetting some of the dates is bad.
        - output.Except(input).Count() * 3000 // Spurious dates cause even more confusion to the user.
      - (int)(avgDateDiff) * 30000; // The difference in average date is the most important guide.
    }

    private static Type[] GetConcreteSubtypes(Type supertype)
    {
      if (subtypes.ContainsKey(supertype))
      {
        return subtypes[supertype];
      }
      else
      {

        var types = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().ToList()
            .SelectMany(s => s.GetTypes())
            .Where(p => supertype.IsAssignableFrom(p) && !p.IsAbstract).ToArray();
        subtypes.Add(supertype, types);
        return types;
      }
    }
  }

Hope this gets you on track. Be sure to share your actual solution somewhere; I think it will be quite useful in lots of scenarios.

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This is an interesting answer; could you provide any concrete examples for tackling similar problems? –  DanP Nov 17 '10 at 13:01
    
@DanP: Composing music, designing a shelter, program generation, stock trading. This technique is called Grammatical Evolution. I've also edited my answer to elaborate. –  Arjen Kruithof Nov 17 '10 at 15:11
    
@Arjen: Sorry...I should have been more clear...how about some examples of open source projects utilizing the techniques you've described? A reference implementation would be very useful here. –  DanP Nov 17 '10 at 19:55
    
@DanP I see what you mean now. I've linked two reference implementations and one site with more general information for you. –  Arjen Kruithof Nov 17 '10 at 22:16
    
@Arjen Kruithof: for myself (and other developers) that haven't dabled much in generic algorithms and the like; would you be willing to provide a small proof of concept? I realize that any sort of full implementation would be a massive undertaking - but how about something to get the ball rolling here? –  DanP Nov 20 '10 at 18:30

If your purpose is to generate human-readable descriptions of the pattern, as in your "Every Monday in November", then you probably want to start by enumerating the possible descriptions. Descriptions can be broken down into frequency and bounds, for example,

Frequency:

  • Every day ...
  • Every other/third/fourth day ...
  • Weekdays/weekends ...
  • Every Monday ...
  • Alternate Mondays ...
  • The first/second/last Monday ...
  • ...

Bounds:

  • ... in January
  • ... between 25 March and 25 October
  • ...

There won't be all that many of each, and you can check for them one by one.

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What I would do:

  1. Create samples of the data
  2. Use a clustering algorithm
  3. Generate samples using the algorithm
  4. Creating a fitness function to measure how well it correlates to the full data set. The clustering algorithm will come up with either 0 or 1 suggestions and you can meassure it against how well it fits in with the full set.
  5. Elementate/merge the occurrence with the already found sets and rerun this algorithm.

Looking at that you may want to use either Simulated Annealing, or an Genetic Algorithm. Also, if you have the descriptions, you may want to compare the descriptions to generate a sample.

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You could access the system date or system dateandtime and construct crude calendar points in memory based on the date and the day of the week as returned by the call or function result. Then use the number of days in relevant months to sum them and add on the number of days of the day variable in the input and/or access the calendar point for the relevant week starting sunday or monday and calculate or increment index forward to the correct day. Construct text string using fixed characters and insert the relevant variable such as the full name of the day of the week as required. There may be multiple traversals needed to obtain all the events of which the occurrences are to be displayed or counted.

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First, find a sequence, if it exists:

step = {day,month,year}
period=0
for d = 1 to dates.count-1
    interval(d,step)=datedifference(s,date(d),date(d+1))
next
' Find frequency with largest interval
for s = year downto day
    found=true
    for d = 1 to dates.count-2
        if interval(d,s)=interval(d+1,s) then
            found=false
            exit for
        end if
    next
    if found then
        period=s
        frequency=interval(1,s)
        exit for
    end if
next

if period>0
    Select case period
      case day
        if frequency mod 7 = 0 then
          say "every" dayname(date(1))
        else
          say "every" frequency "days"
        end if
      case month
        say "every" frequency "months on day" daynumber(date(1))
      case years
        say "every" frequency "years on" daynumber(date(1)) monthname(date(1))
    end select
end if

Finally, deal with "in November", "from 2007 to 2010" etc., should be obvious.

HTH

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I think you'll have to build it, and I think it will be a devil in the details kind of project. Start by getting much more thorough requirements. Which date patterns do you want to recognize? Come up with a list of examples that you want your algorithm to successfully identify. Write your algorithm to meet your examples. Put your examples in a test suite so when you get different requirements later you can make sure you didn't break the old ones.

I predict you will write 200 if-then-else statements.

OK, I do have one idea. Get familiar with the concepts of sets, unions, coverage, intersection and so on. Have a list of short patterns that you search for, say, "Every day in October", "Every day in November", and "Every day in December." If these short patterns are contained within the set of dates, then define a union function that can combine shorter patterns in intelligent ways. For example, let's say you matched the three patterns I mention above. If you Union them together you get, "Every day in October through December." You could aim to return the most succinct set of unions that cover your set of dates or something like that.

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1  
Then, put it on git-hub or something so that the next guy doesn't have to build it. –  Dave Aaron Smith Nov 9 '10 at 19:40

Have a look at your favourite calendar program. See what patterns of event recurrence it can generate. Reverse engineer them.

share|improve this answer
    
-1: Your suggestion is 'Reverse engineer the patterns'. This question is about how to actually accomplish that. Therefore your answer circles right back to the question. –  Arjen Kruithof Nov 17 '10 at 6:55
    
Can you provide an example of a 'calendar program' that provides such capabilities? I can't say I've ever seen a working implementation of what's described here... –  DanP Nov 17 '10 at 19:56

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