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I've been using Javascript closures to protect variables by making them local to the returned functions, such as:

closure = function() {
    var secretVar = 'Secret';

    return {
        "msg" : function() {
            console.log(secretVar);
        }
    };
}();
console.log(closure.secretVar); // Undefined
closure.msg(); // Secret

I feel that I have a pretty good grasp of that, giving me the ability to control how inner variables are accessed if at all.

I'm now running into this problem

closure = function() {
    var secretVar = ['Secret One','Secret Two'];

    return {
        "del" : function(modMe) {
            modMe = secretVar;
            modMe.slice(1,1);
            console.log(modMe);
        }(secretVar),
        "secretVar" : function() {
            console.log(secretVar);
        }
    };
}();
closure.del(); // Secret One
closure.secretVar(); // Secret One

I want closure.del() to return Secret One, but I want the secretVar to remained untouched, however, it's not. The del() function is modifying the reference rather than a copy, and I'm unsure of how to get it to copy secretVar and modify that.

I'm guessing it's going to be in the form of

(function(y) {
    //..Body that changes y
})(secretVar)

but I haven't been able to get that to work. Any ideas?

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3  
I assume you meant slice instead of splice –  Robert Nov 9 '10 at 19:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your problem actually has nothing to do with closures. When you do:

modMe = secretVar;

You are just creating a new variable pointing to the same array. What you do to one will be reflected in both variables, since they are pointing to the same thing.

If you want to perform some sort of modification on the array (while maintaining the original), you need to copy it first:

var copied = [];
for(var i = 0; i < secretVar.length; i++){
    copied.push(secretVar[i]);
}

Edit: As an aside, when you say you are using closures to "protect variables" you're not protecting them from being modified by the returned functions that performed the closure. You just made it so that the variable is inaccessible from outside the scope of those functions. But, inside the scope, such as when you do your slice, the variable is there and accessible to that function and is not "protected" just because it is a closure.

Edit 2: If you are going to be copying the array frequently, you can eliminate some of the irritation of the iteration by creating a closured function to do the copying for you:

closure = function() {
    var secretVar = 'Secret';
    var clone = function(){
        var clonedArr = [];
        var length = secretVar.length;
        for(var i = 0; i < length; i++){
            clonedArr.push(secretVar[i]);
        }
        return clonedArr;
    }

    return {
        "msg" : function() {
            var duplicate = clone();
        }
    };
}();
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I was hoping there was a more straightforward way rather than iterating through everything in the array. No such luck? –  A Wizard Did It Nov 9 '10 at 19:34
    
Iterating is really the best way to go. But you have to remember - if the value in the array you are iterating is another object (say, a nested array), when you do a top level "copy" like above you are still copying the nested array by reference, and would see side effects in those as well. Primitives (such as numbers) and immutable values (such as strings) do not have this behavior, just higher level objects. –  Matt Nov 9 '10 at 19:42
    
obviously we don't know your full use case scenario, but if you are going to be cloning the array often, you could create another closured function for the clone. see update above –  Matt Nov 9 '10 at 19:50
4  
JS idiom for array copy: copied= secretVar.slice(). –  bobince Nov 9 '10 at 19:56
    
@bobince - nice! will leave in the closured function example though since the asker seems interested in closures and their scope. –  Matt Nov 9 '10 at 19:58

Very close -- the form is:

(function(y) {
    return function() {
        // that changes y
    };
})(secretVar)

NOTE: This will still pass a reference, and any destructive or altering operations will still affect secretVar. You'll need to make a deep copy of secretVar if you want to avoid altering it.

SEE: http://jsfiddle.net/B3ryr/2/

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1  
If your inner function there modifies secretVar, you will still have a side effect. Slice returns a new array, so it is remains un-modified under those circumstances. So, depending on his use case, this may or may not be what he is after. –  Matt Nov 9 '10 at 19:46
    
I'm getting ['A','B'] still when I remove the [0] from the alert(), so y doesn't seem to be actually modified... hmm –  Robert Nov 9 '10 at 19:47
    
@Robert see the definition of slice for JS - it returns a new copy of the selected sliced portion of the array. w3schools.com/jsref/jsref_slice_array.asp. It does not modify the original array. –  Matt Nov 9 '10 at 19:49
    
@Matt -- correct. I thought, for some reason, that it would make an implicit copy for the inner closer, but after a moment of experimentation, I learned I was wrong :-) Thanks! –  Sean Vieira Nov 9 '10 at 19:51
1  
@Matt - which makes me wonder if modMe = secretVar.slice(0) is a valid way to the copy of an Array, as it will begin at 0 and complete the sequence. -- Just saw that bobince posted this... cool information. –  Robert Nov 9 '10 at 20:05

Robert made a good comment, but also note that closure.del is not a function, but undefined. Take another look at your code. The function is automatically executed and returns nothing, so del will be nothing.

var del = function(modMe) {
  modMe = secretVar;
  modMe.slice(1,1);
  console.log(modMe);
}(secretVar);

It's generally this form:

var a = function(b){
  console.log(b)
}('input');

console.log( typeof a ); // undefined
a(); // error: a is not a function
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Yeah, I know it won't work that way, but that was my attempt to get it to work, which failed miserably :P –  A Wizard Did It Nov 9 '10 at 19:36
    
Even if it returns something, it won't be a function. –  Harmen Nov 9 '10 at 19:38

Your function(modMe) { ... }(secretVar) expression is actually returning a value and not a function, since you are executing the function. Coupled with Matt's answer, you need to:

  1. Remove the (secretVar) component from the expression as well as the modMe parameter -- the function already has access to secretVar anyway.
  2. Actually copy the array before working on it. See Matt's answer.
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