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I'm about to punch PHP in the nads. I've got an incredibly simple operation that is basically acting with a mind of it's own.

$this->user = $this->processToken($token);

if(!isset($this->user))
{
    $this->sendError(401);
}

w/ a valid $token this sends a 401, which it shouldn't. But this:

$this->user = $this->processToken($token);

print_r($this->user);

if(!isset($this->user))
{
    $this->sendError(401);
}

works without a hitch, except for the fact that I now have an array printed out on the screen. $user is a VO, replacing print_r(...) with echo $this->user->name has the produces the same result (sans array of course).

EDIT: I should add, the operation after this returns an incremented int. Which even when the error is sent still increments (as long as the token is correct). So it does look like the header is overriding the end result. I would have thought the if would prevent the header from getting written though?

UPDATE To make things weirder. If I echo ''; in the same place, it doesn't override anything, and the error still gets displayed.... again, even with good token.

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Is $this->user === null, and still sends a 401? –  netcoder Nov 9 '10 at 19:33
    
Does $this->user happen to be a private variable in a parent class definition? –  Pekka 웃 Nov 9 '10 at 19:33
    
@Pekka, no its public. –  noazark Nov 9 '10 at 19:41
    
With print_r are you getting the value printed out that you expect $this->user to have? –  Alan Geleynse Nov 9 '10 at 19:43
    
@Alan, yeah. everything in the user is fine. –  noazark Nov 9 '10 at 19:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

print_r() nullifies the header 401 Unauthorized sent to the browser - which now results in Headers already sent error.

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does echo do the same thing? –  noazark Nov 9 '10 at 19:46
1  
echo(), printf(), var_dump(), print_r(), var_export() will all cancel the header –  stillstanding Nov 9 '10 at 19:50
    
well alright then. I guess that solves half of my problem. –  noazark Nov 9 '10 at 19:51

If your sendError function is using header to send a 401 response, that is why print_r is changing the result.

Unless you have output buffering enabled, anything you send before calling header will cause the headers to not be sent correctly. This is because the headers and some content have already been sent.

It looks like somehow your header is getting sent no matter what. Without looking at the rest of your code I cannot be sure, but print_r, echo, or any other type of output before the header would cause it to not be sent.

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even though it is encapsulated in the if? –  noazark Nov 9 '10 at 19:40

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