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I'm adding tool tips using the qtip jquery plugin. I may add 50-60 tool tips over an entire site.

The way I've found to do it right now is ti cut/paste the jquery code over and over. For example:

// First, setup a tool tip for 'Enter Username'.
$("input#user_login").qtip({
   content: 'Enter username',
   position: {
     corner: {
       target: 'rightMiddle',
       tooltip: 'leftMiddle'
     }
   },
   style: { 
     border: {
       width: 1,
       radius: 3,
       color: '#0066CC'
    },
    width: 200,
    name: 'blue'
  }   
});

Now, repeat everything for 'First Name'. Seems pointless.

$("input#user_login").qtip({
   content: 'Enter First Name',
   position: {
     corner: {
       target: 'rightMiddle',
       tooltip: 'leftMiddle'
     }
   },
   style: { 
     border: {
       width: 1,
       radius: 3,
       color: '#0066CC'
    },
    width: 200,
    name: 'blue'
  }  
});

How do I create a function I can just pass the display text in to?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As a generic solution, any time you want to use default options then extend it, you can just use $.extend() on it, like this:

var qtip_options = {
   content: 'I'm a tooltip,
   position: {
     corner: {
       target: 'rightMiddle',
       tooltip: 'leftMiddle'
     }
   },
   style: { 
     border: {
       width: 1,
       radius: 3,
       color: '#0066CC'
    },
    width: 200,
    name: 'blue'
  }   
};

$("#user_login").qtip($.extend({}, qtip_options, { content: 'Enter username'});
$("#first_name").qtip($.extend({}, qtip_options, { content: 'Enter First Name'});

Or in your case since you're doing it a lot, let's use a plugin, like this:

$.fn.myQtip = function(text) {
  return this.qtip($.extend({}, qtip_options, { content: text});
};

Then just call it like this:

$("#user_login").myQtip('Enter username');
$("#first_name").myQtip('Enter First Name');
share|improve this answer
    
Implemented, working and exactly what I was thinking about. Thanks! –  Kevin Bedell Nov 9 '10 at 20:28
function setupToolTip(jQueryElement, display) {
  jQueryElement.qtip({
     content: display,
     position: {
       corner: {
         target: 'rightMiddle',
         tooltip: 'leftMiddle'
       }
     },
     style: { 
       border: {
         width: 1,
         radius: 3,
         color: '#0066CC'
      },
      width: 200,
      name: 'blue'
    }   
  });
}

setupToolTip($("input#user_login"), 'Enter username');
setupToolTip($("input#user_first_name"), 'Enter First Name');
share|improve this answer

If all other options (like style and width) are the same for all your tooltips, I would recommend changing the default values in the plugin code. This will allow you to make tooltips like this:

$("input#user_login").qtip({content: "Enter username"});
$("input#user_password").qtip({content: "Enter password"});
share|improve this answer

Instead of targetting specific element, you can target all of them at once by class. You then hide the values in your HTML. This way you only need ONE call to set up qTip and it finds your content automatically. You never need to modify your script as more elements are added, just give them a class of "hasTip" and you're all set.

$(".hasTip").qtip({
   content: $(this).next('.tipText').html(),
   ...

In your HTML (place this right after the element that has a class of "hasTip"):

<div class='tipText' style='display:none">First Name</div>

Write once, use everywhere.

EDIT:

Nick, You are correct, my "this" reference is wrong. I do believe in "self-discovery" in tools like this. They simply find their own content and hook themselves up without intervention.

I don't believe this is "markup overkill" any more than $("#user_login").qtip($.extend({}, qtip_options, { content: 'Enter username'}); is "function call overkill". They're just different ways of approaching a problem.

I like my method because I can "include and forget" and never have to write element-specific initialization.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like tremendous overkill in markup, why not a data attribute? Also in your example this refers to document, you'd need a .each() look for this to refer to the .hasTip element you're after. –  Nick Craver Nov 9 '10 at 20:01
    
Please see my edits. –  Diodeus Nov 9 '10 at 20:12

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