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This question already has an answer here:

I have a Ruby hash:

ages = { "Bruce" => 32,
         "Clark" => 28
       }

Assuming I have another hash of replacement names, is there an elegant way to rename all the keys so that I end up with:

ages = { "Bruce Wayne" => 32,
         "Clark Kent" => 28
       }
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jörg W Mittag ruby Feb 1 at 4:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

11 Answers 11

up vote 147 down vote accepted
ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}

ages.map {|k, v| [mappings[k], v] }.to_h
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is great! Now, if I only want to change some of the key names, is there a way to test if a mapping exist for the key? – Chanpory Nov 9 '10 at 20:18
24  
Just use mappings[k] || k instead of mappings[k] above and it will leave keys not in the mapping as is. – Mladen Jablanović Nov 9 '10 at 20:26
    
Brilliant! THanks so much :-) – Chanpory Nov 9 '10 at 20:30
1  
map returns an Array of Arrays, you can transform back to Hash by using ages.map {...}.to_h – caesarsol Sep 17 '14 at 13:49
1  
Although to_h is only available in Ruby 2.0 onwards. In Ruby 1.9.3 I did it by wrapping the whole thing in Hash[...] – digitig Sep 18 '14 at 14:18

I liked Jörg W Mittag's answer, but it can be improved.

If you want to rename the keys of your current Hash and not to create a new Hash with the renamed keys, the following snippet does exactly that:

ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}

ages.keys.each { |k| ages[ mappings[k] ] = ages.delete(k) if mappings[k] }
ages

There's also the advantage of only renaming the necessary keys.

Performance considerations:

Based on the Tin Man's answer, my answer is about 20% faster than Jörg W Mittag's answer for a Hash with only two keys. It may get even higher performance for Hashes with many keys, specially if there are just a few keys to be renamed.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this. One gotcha that hit me was I used this in as_json() call, and although the main attributes keys were converted to string, the options.merge(:methods => [:blah]) then that is a key in the map not a string. – peterept Mar 8 '13 at 1:04
1  
@peterept you can try options.with_indifferent_access.merge(:methods => [:blah]). This will make options access strings or symbols as keys. – barbolo Mar 9 '13 at 15:20
    
Love the answer...but I am confused how this actually works. How is the value set on each set? – Clayton Selby Mar 10 '15 at 5:14
    
Hi, @ClaytonSelby. Can you better explain what is confusing you? – barbolo Mar 10 '15 at 13:01
    
I know the question says "all keys" but if you want to make this faster, you should probably iterate through mappings not the hash your renaming. Worst case, it's the same speed. – Ryan Taylor Mar 16 at 22:29

Just to see what was faster:

require 'fruity'

AGES = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
MAPPINGS = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}

def jörg_w_mittag_test(ages, mappings)
  Hash[ages.map {|k, v| [mappings[k], v] }]
end

require 'facets/hash/rekey'
def tyler_rick_test(ages, mappings)
  ages.rekey(mappings)
end

def barbolo_test(ages, mappings)
  ages.keys.each { |k| ages[ mappings[k] ] = ages.delete(k) if mappings[k] }
  ages
end

class Hash
  def tfr_rekey(h)
    dup.tfr_rekey! h
  end

  def tfr_rekey!(h)
    h.each { |k, newk| store(newk, delete(k)) if has_key? k }
    self
  end
end

def tfr_test(ages, mappings)
  ages.tfr_rekey mappings
end

class Hash
  def rename_keys(mapping)
    result = {}
    self.map do |k,v|
      mapped_key = mapping[k] ? mapping[k] : k
      result[mapped_key] = v.kind_of?(Hash) ? v.rename_keys(mapping) : v
      result[mapped_key] = v.collect{ |obj| obj.rename_keys(mapping) if obj.kind_of?(Hash)} if v.kind_of?(Array)
    end
    result
  end
end

def greg_test(ages, mappings)
  ages.rename_keys(mappings)
end

compare do
  jörg_w_mittag { jörg_w_mittag_test(AGES.dup, MAPPINGS.dup) }
  tyler_rick    { tyler_rick_test(AGES.dup, MAPPINGS.dup)    }
  barbolo       { barbolo_test(AGES.dup, MAPPINGS.dup)       }
  greg          { greg_test(AGES.dup, MAPPINGS.dup)          }
end

Which outputs:

Running each test 1024 times. Test will take about 1 second.
barbolo is faster than jörg_w_mittag by 19.999999999999996% ± 10.0%
jörg_w_mittag is faster than greg by 10.000000000000009% ± 10.0%
greg is faster than tyler_rick by 30.000000000000004% ± 10.0%

Caution: barbell's solution uses if mappings[k], which will cause the resulting hash to be wrong if mappings[k] results in a nil value.

share|improve this answer

I monkey-patched the class to handle nested Hashes and Arrays:

   #  Netsted Hash:
   # 
   #  str_hash = {
   #                "a"  => "a val", 
   #                "b"  => "b val",
   #                "c" => {
   #                          "c1" => "c1 val",
   #                          "c2" => "c2 val"
   #                        }, 
   #                "d"  => "d val",
   #           }
   #           
   # mappings = {
   #              "a" => "apple",
   #              "b" => "boss",
   #              "c" => "cat",
   #              "c1" => "cat 1"
   #           }
   # => {"apple"=>"a val", "boss"=>"b val", "cat"=>{"cat 1"=>"c1 val", "c2"=>"c2 val"}, "d"=>"d val"}
   #
   class Hash
    def rename_keys(mapping)
      result = {}
      self.map do |k,v|
        mapped_key = mapping[k] ? mapping[k] : k
        result[mapped_key] = v.kind_of?(Hash) ? v.rename_keys(mapping) : v
        result[mapped_key] = v.collect{ |obj| obj.rename_keys(mapping) if obj.kind_of?(Hash)} if v.kind_of?(Array)
      end
    result
   end
  end
share|improve this answer
    
Very helpful. Adapted it to my needs to make camel case keys underscore style. – idStar Mar 7 '13 at 1:45
    
nice! it could be more flexible to check for .responds_to?(:rename_keys) instead of .kind_of?(Hash), and the equivalent for Array, what do you think? – caesarsol Sep 17 '14 at 15:05

There's the under-utilized each_with_object method in Ruby as well:

ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = { "Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent" }

ages.each_with_object({}) { |(k, v), memo| memo[mappings[k]] = v }
share|improve this answer
    
each_with_object is definitely under-utilized, and is clearer and easier to remember than inject. It was a welcome addition when it was introduced. – the Tin Man Mar 28 at 22:20

If the mapping Hash will be smaller than the data Hash then iterate on mappings instead. This is useful for renaming a few fields in a large Hash:

class Hash
  def rekey(h)
    dup.rekey! h
  end

  def rekey!(h)
    h.each { |k, newk| store(newk, delete(k)) if has_key? k }
    self
  end
end

ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28, "John" => 36 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}
p ages.rekey! mappings
share|improve this answer

The Facets gem provides a rekey method that does exactly what you're wanting.

As long as you're okay with a dependency on the Facets gem, you can pass a hash of mappings to rekey and it will return a new hash with the new keys:

require 'facets/hash/rekey'
ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}
ages.rekey(mappings)
=> {"Bruce Wayne"=>32, "Clark Kent"=>28}

If you want to modify ages hash in place, you can use the rekey! version:

ages.rekey!(mappings)
ages
=> {"Bruce Wayne"=>32, "Clark Kent"=>28}
share|improve this answer
ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}
ages = mappings.inject({}) {|memo, mapping| memo[mapping[1]] = ages[mapping[0]]; memo}
puts ages.inspect
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ages = mappings.inject({}) {|memo, (old_key, new_key)| memo[new_key] = ages[old-key]; memo} – frogstarr78 Nov 9 '10 at 20:07

You may wish to use Object#tap to avoid the need to return ages after the keys have been modified:

ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}

ages.tap {|h| h.keys.each {|k| (h[mappings[k]] = h.delete(k)) if mappings.key?(k)}}
  #=> {"Bruce Wayne"=>32, "Clark Kent"=>28}
share|improve this answer
>> x={ :a => 'qwe', :b => 'asd'}
=> {:a=>"qwe", :b=>"asd"}
>> rename={:a=>:qwe}
=> {:a=>:qwe}
>> rename.each{|old,new| x[new] = x.delete old}
=> {:a=>:qwe}
>> x
=> {:b=>"asd", :qwe=>"qwe"}

This would loop just through renames hash.

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I used this to allow "friendly" names in a Cucumber table to be parsed into class attributes such that Factory Girl could create an instance:

Given(/^an organization exists with the following attributes:$/) do |table|
  # Build a mapping from the "friendly" text in the test to the lower_case actual name in the class
  map_to_keys = Hash.new
  table.transpose.hashes.first.keys.each { |x| map_to_keys[x] = x.downcase.gsub(' ', '_') }
  table.transpose.hashes.each do |obj|
    obj.keys.each { |k| obj[map_to_keys[k]] = obj.delete(k) if map_to_keys[k] }
    create(:organization, Rack::Utils.parse_nested_query(obj.to_query))
  end
end

For what it's worth, the Cucumber table looks like this:

  Background:
    And an organization exists with the following attributes:
      | Name            | Example Org                        |
      | Subdomain       | xfdc                               |
      | Phone Number    | 123-123-1234                       |
      | Address         | 123 E Walnut St, Anytown, PA 18999 |
      | Billing Contact | Alexander Hamilton                 |
      | Billing Address | 123 E Walnut St, Anytown, PA 18999 |

And map_to_keys looks like this:

{
               "Name" => "name",
          "Subdomain" => "subdomain",
       "Phone Number" => "phone_number",
            "Address" => "address",
    "Billing Contact" => "billing_contact",
    "Billing Address" => "billing_address"
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the edit, @the Tin Man – Jon Kern Mar 29 at 1:09

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