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This question already has an answer here:

I have a ruby hash:

ages = { "Bruce" => 32,
         "Clark" => 28
       }

Assuming I have another hash of replacement names, is there an elegant way to rename all the keys so that I end up with:

ages = { "Bruce Wayne" => 32,
         "Clark Kent" => 28
       }
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Jörg W Mittag ruby Feb 1 at 4:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

11 Answers 11

up vote 127 down vote accepted
ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}

ages.map {|k, v| [mappings[k], v] }.to_h
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is great! Now, if I only want to change some of the key names, is there a way to test if a mapping exist for the key? – Chanpory Nov 9 '10 at 20:18
17  
Just use mappings[k] || k instead of mappings[k] above and it will leave keys not in the mapping as is. – Mladen Jablanović Nov 9 '10 at 20:26
    
Brilliant! THanks so much :-) – Chanpory Nov 9 '10 at 20:30
1  
map returns an Array of Arrays, you can transform back to Hash by using ages.map {...}.to_h – caesarsol Sep 17 '14 at 13:49
1  
Although to_h is only available in Ruby 2.0 onwards. In Ruby 1.9.3 I did it by wrapping the whole thing in Hash[...] – digitig Sep 18 '14 at 14:18
ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}
ages = mappings.inject({}) {|memo, mapping| memo[mapping[1]] = ages[mapping[0]]; memo}
puts ages.inspect
share|improve this answer
    
ages = mappings.inject({}) {|memo, (old_key, new_key)| memo[new_key] = ages[old-key]; memo} – frogstarr78 Nov 9 '10 at 20:07

I Monkey Patched the class to handle Nested Hashes and Arrays

   #  Netsted Hash:
   # 
   #  str_hash = {
   #                "a"  => "a val", 
   #                "b"  => "b val",
   #                "c" => {
   #                          "c1" => "c1 val",
   #                          "c2" => "c2 val"
   #                        }, 
   #                "d"  => "d val",
   #           }
   #           
   # mappings = {
   #              "a" => "apple",
   #              "b" => "boss",
   #              "c" => "cat",
   #              "c1" => "cat 1"
   #           }
   # => {"apple"=>"a val", "boss"=>"b val", "cat"=>{"cat 1"=>"c1 val", "c2"=>"c2 val"}, "d"=>"d val"}
   #
   class Hash
    def rename_keys(mapping)
      result = {}
      self.map do |k,v|
        mapped_key = mapping[k] ? mapping[k] : k
        result[mapped_key] = v.kind_of?(Hash) ? v.rename_keys(mapping) : v
        result[mapped_key] = v.collect{ |obj| obj.rename_keys(mapping) if obj.kind_of?(Hash)} if v.kind_of?(Array)
      end
    result
   end
  end
share|improve this answer
    
Very helpful. Adapted it to my needs to make camel case keys underscore style. – idStar Mar 7 '13 at 1:45
    
nice! it could be more flexible to check for .responds_to?(:rename_keys) instead of .kind_of?(Hash), and the equivalent for Array, what do you think? – caesarsol Sep 17 '14 at 15:05

I liked the Jörg W Mittag's answer, but it can be improved. If you want to rename the keys of your current Hash and not to create a new Hash with the renamed keys, the following snippet does exactly that:

ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}

ages.keys.each { |k| ages[ mappings[k] ] = ages.delete(k) if mappings[k] }
ages

There's also the advantage of only renaming the necessary keys.

Performance considerations

Based on the Tin Man answer, my answer is about 20% faster than the Jörg W Mittag's answer for a Hash with only 2 keys. It may get even higher performance for Hashes with many keys, specially if there are just a few keys to be renamed.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this. One gotcha that hit me was I used this in as_json() call, and although the main attributes keys were converted to string, the options.merge(:methods => [:blah]) then that is a key in the map not a string. – peterept Mar 8 '13 at 1:04
1  
@peterept you can try options.with_indifferent_access.merge(:methods => [:blah]). This will make options access strings or symbols as keys. – barbolo Mar 9 '13 at 15:20
    
Love the answer...but I am confused how this actually works. How is the value set on each set? – Clayton Selby Mar 10 '15 at 5:14
    
Hi, @ClaytonSelby. Can you better explain what is confusing you? – barbolo Mar 10 '15 at 13:01

If the mapping hash will be smaller than the data hash then iterate on mappings instead. This is useful for renaming a few fields in a large hash

class Hash
  def rekey(h)
    dup.rekey! h
  end

  def rekey!(h)
    h.each { |k, newk| store(newk, delete(k)) if has_key? k }
    self
  end
end

ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28, "John" => 36 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}
p ages.rekey! mappings
share|improve this answer

The facets gem provides a rekey method that does exactly what you're wanting.

As long as you're okay with a dependency on the facets gem, you can just pass a hash of mappings to rekey like this and it will return a new hash with the new keys:

require 'facets/hash/rekey'
ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}
ages.rekey(mappings)
=> {"Bruce Wayne"=>32, "Clark Kent"=>28}

If you want to modify ages hash in place, you can use the rekey! version:

ages.rekey!(mappings)
ages
=> {"Bruce Wayne"=>32, "Clark Kent"=>28}
share|improve this answer

Just to see what was faster:

require 'fruity'

AGES = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
MAPPINGS = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}

def jörg_w_mittag_test(ages, mappings)
  Hash[ages.map {|k, v| [mappings[k], v] }]
end

require 'facets/hash/rekey'
def tyler_rick_test(ages, mappings)
  ages.rekey(mappings)
end

def barbolo_test(ages, mappings)
  ages.keys.each { |k| ages[ mappings[k] ] = ages.delete(k) if mappings[k] }
  ages
end

class Hash
  def tfr_rekey(h)
    dup.tfr_rekey! h
  end

  def tfr_rekey!(h)
    h.each { |k, newk| store(newk, delete(k)) if has_key? k }
    self
  end
end

def tfr_test(ages, mappings)
  ages.tfr_rekey mappings
end

class Hash
  def rename_keys(mapping)
    result = {}
    self.map do |k,v|
      mapped_key = mapping[k] ? mapping[k] : k
      result[mapped_key] = v.kind_of?(Hash) ? v.rename_keys(mapping) : v
      result[mapped_key] = v.collect{ |obj| obj.rename_keys(mapping) if obj.kind_of?(Hash)} if v.kind_of?(Array)
    end
    result
  end
end

def greg_test(ages, mappings)
  ages.rename_keys(mappings)
end

compare do
  jörg_w_mittag { jörg_w_mittag_test(AGES.dup, MAPPINGS.dup) }
  tyler_rick    { tyler_rick_test(AGES.dup, MAPPINGS.dup)    }
  barbolo       { barbolo_test(AGES.dup, MAPPINGS.dup)       }
  greg          { greg_test(AGES.dup, MAPPINGS.dup)          }
end

Which outputs:

Running each test 1024 times. Test will take about 1 second.
barbolo is faster than jörg_w_mittag by 19.999999999999996% ± 10.0%
jörg_w_mittag is faster than greg by 10.000000000000009% ± 10.0%
greg is faster than tyler_rick by 30.000000000000004% ± 10.0%
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>> x={ :a => 'qwe', :b => 'asd'}
=> {:a=>"qwe", :b=>"asd"}
>> rename={:a=>:qwe}
=> {:a=>:qwe}
>> rename.each{|old,new| x[new] = x.delete old}
=> {:a=>:qwe}
>> x
=> {:b=>"asd", :qwe=>"qwe"}

This would loop just through renames hash.

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Great answers! Thanks :-)

I used this to allow "friendly" names in a Cucumber table to be parsed into class attributes such that the Factory Girl factory could create an instance:

Given(/^an organization exists with the following attributes:$/) do |table|
  # Build a mapping from the "friendly" text in the test to the lower_case actual name in the class
  map_to_keys = Hash.new
  table.transpose.hashes.first.keys.each { |x| map_to_keys[x] = x.downcase.gsub(' ', '_') }
  table.transpose.hashes.each do |obj|
    obj.keys.each { |k| obj[map_to_keys[k]] = obj.delete(k) if map_to_keys[k] }
    create(:organization, Rack::Utils.parse_nested_query(obj.to_query))
  end
end

FWIW: the Cucumber table looks like this:

  Background:
    And an organization exists with the following attributes:
      | Name            | Example Org                        |
      | Subdomain       | xfdc                               |
      | Phone Number    | 123-123-1234                       |
      | Address         | 123 E Walnut St, Anytown, PA 18999 |
      | Billing Contact | Alexander Hamilton                 |
      | Billing Address | 123 E Walnut St, Anytown, PA 18999 |

And the map_to_keys looks like this:

{
               "Name" => "name",
          "Subdomain" => "subdomain",
       "Phone Number" => "phone_number",
            "Address" => "address",
    "Billing Contact" => "billing_contact",
    "Billing Address" => "billing_address"
}
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There's the under utilized each_with_object method in Ruby as well.

ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}

ages.each_with_object({}) { |(k, v), memo| memo[mappings[k]] = v }
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You may wish to use Object#tap to avoid the need to return ages after the keys have been modified:

ages = { "Bruce" => 32, "Clark" => 28 }
mappings = {"Bruce" => "Bruce Wayne", "Clark" => "Clark Kent"}

ages.tap {|h| h.keys.each {|k| (h[mappings[k]] = h.delete(k)) if mappings.key?(k)}}
  #=> {"Bruce Wayne"=>32, "Clark Kent"=>28}
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