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It's very annoying to have this limitation on my development box, when there won't ever be any users other than me.

I'm aware of the standard workarounds, but none of them do exactly what I want:

  1. authbind (The version in Debian testing, 1.0, only supports IPv4)
  2. Using the iptables REDIRECT target to redirect a low port to a high port (the "nat" table is not yet implemented for ip6tables, the IPv6 version of iptables)
  3. sudo (Running as root is what I'm trying to avoid)
  4. SELinux (or similar). (This is just my dev box, I don't want to introduce a lot of extra complexity.)

So is there some simple sysctl variable for this, or am I just out of luck?

EDIT: In some cases, you can use capabilities to do this.

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2  
Why do you NEED to use a port less than 1024? –  Craig Jan 5 '09 at 17:17
3  
In my experience, one reason for attempting this is to write a web server rather than use Apache (or lighttpd). –  S.Lott Jan 5 '09 at 17:45
    
I've added the setcap stuff to my answer to the nearly identical stackoverflow.com/questions/277991/… –  Paul Tomblin Jan 5 '09 at 20:07
    
Why does this have the IPv6 tag? –  james woodyatt Mar 29 '10 at 20:36
10  
Because in this instance, I was using IPv6, which was why some of the "usual" workarounds (authbind and iptables REDIRECT) didn't work for me. –  Jason Creighton Mar 30 '10 at 2:51

15 Answers 15

up vote 143 down vote accepted

Okay, thanks to the people who pointed out the capabilities system and CAP_NET_BIND_SERVICE capability. If you have a recent kernel, it is indeed possible to use this to start a service as non-root but bind low ports. The short answer is that you do:

setcap 'cap_net_bind_service=+ep' /path/to/program

And then anytime program is executed thereafter it will have the CAP_NET_BIND_SERVICE capability. setcap is in the debian package libcap2-bin.

Now for the caveats:

  1. You will need at least a 2.6.24 kernel
  2. This won't work if your file is a script. (ie, uses a #! line to launch an interpreter). In this case, as far I as understand, you'd have to apply the capability to the interpreter executable itself, which of course is a security nightmare, since any program using that interpreter will have the capability. I wasn't able to find any clean, easy way to work around this problem.
  3. Linux will disable LD_LIBRARY_PATH on any program that has elevated privileges like setcap or suid. So if your program uses its own .../lib/, you might have to look into another option like port forwarding.

Resources:

Note: RHEL first added this in v6.

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2  
Partial workaround for scripts: create a copy of the interpreter (e.g. bash), give it the capablities but restrict access to the copy to those users who need it. Of course, those users must be trusted, but they could change the script anyway. –  ammoQ Nov 19 '09 at 12:08
3  
Aside from the aforementioned debian (binary) package, the developer's site is friedhoff.org/posixfilecaps.html associated papers/presentations/etc... –  RandomNickName42 Jan 16 '10 at 15:34
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Yes @C.Ross since it would have to be applied to /usr/bin/java and then would open the capability to any java app running on the system. Too bad capabilities cannot also be set per-user. –  joeytwiddle Aug 15 '13 at 11:02
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Does the setcap setting persist across reboots; if not is there a standard place to put this rule so that is it run during system startup? Is /etc/security/capability.conf on Debian/Ubuntu any help? –  joeytwiddle Aug 15 '13 at 11:06
1  
This answer isn't the best way to go, see the first comment to this answer (the correct answer, I think), for why. –  Greg Slepak Feb 3 at 20:54

The standard way is to make them "setuid" so that they start up as root, and then they throw away that root privilege as soon as they've bound to the port but before they start accepting connections to it. You can see good examples of that in the source code for Apache and INN. I'm told that Lighttpd is another good example.

Another example is Postfix, which uses multiple daemons that communicate through pipes, and only one or two of them (which do very little except accept or emit bytes) run as root and the rest run at a lower privilege.

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1  
Interestingly, this doesn't work under recent versions of Linux (maybe just Ubuntu) without CAP_SETUID set. So if you need setuid you're going to have to set this capability anyway. –  Matt Feb 19 '13 at 4:12
    
Dropping root privs is the right way to do this. Though it's not necessary to set setuid if you have init/upstart/systemd start the service. –  Michael Hampton Feb 9 at 16:34

You can do a port redirect. This is what I do for a Silverlight policy server running on a Linux box

iptables -A PREROUTING -t nat -i eth0 -p tcp --dport 943 -j REDIRECT --to-port 1300
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Unfortunately this will only work for routed connections, i.e. not from the local machine. –  zbyszek Feb 3 '12 at 11:52
    
Where is a good place to put this? –  joeytwiddle Aug 15 '13 at 10:57
    
@joeytwiddle I think it's in the script that runs (starts) your server, but I might be wrong. I'd also like to know :P –  Camilo Martin Jul 9 at 22:06
    
@CamiloMartin Looking again, the Debian documentation which was linked from the question recommends placing it in your firewall script, or creating one at /etc/network/if-up.d/firewall. –  joeytwiddle Jul 10 at 8:08

File capabilities are not ideal, because they can break after a package update.

The ideal solution, IMHO, should be an ability to create a shell with inheritable CAP_NET_BIND_SERVICE set.

Here's a somewhat convoluted way to do this:

sg $DAEMONUSER "capsh --keep=1 --uid=`id -u $DAEMONUSER` \
     --caps='cap_net_bind_service+pei' -- \
     YOUR_COMMAND_GOES_HERE"

capsh utility can be found in libcap2-bin package in Debian/Ubuntu distributions. Here's what goes on:

  • sg changes effective group ID to that of the daemon user. This is necessary because capsh leaves GID unchanged and we definitely do not want it.
  • Sets bit 'keep capabilities on UID change'.
  • Changes UID to $DAEMONUSER
  • Drops all caps (at this moment all caps are still present because of --keep=1), except inheritable cap_net_bind_service
  • Executes your command ('--' is a separator)

The result is a process with specified user and group, and cap_net_bind_service privileges.

As an example, a line from ejabberd startup script:

sg $EJABBERDUSER "capsh --keep=1 --uid=`id -u $EJABBERDUSER` --caps='cap_net_bind_service+pei' -- $EJABBERD --noshell -detached"
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Two other simple possibilities:

There is an old (unfashionable) solution to the "a daemon that binds on a low port and hands control to your daemon". It's called inetd (or xinetd). The cons are:

  • your daemon needs to talk on stdin/stdout (if you don't control the daemon -- if you don't have the source -- then this is perhaps a showstopper, although some services may have an inetd-compatibility flag)
  • a new daemon process is forked for every connection
  • it's one extra link in the chain

Pros:

  • available on any old UNIX
  • once your sysadmin has set up the config, you're good to go about your development (when you re-build your daemon, might you lose setcap capabilities? And then you'll have to go back to your admin "please sir...")
  • daemon doesn't have to worry about that networking stuff, just has to talk on stdin/stdout
  • can configure to execute your daemon as a non-root user, as requested

Another alternative: a hacked-up proxy (netcat or even something more robust) from the privileged port to some arbitrary high-numbered port where you can run your target daemon. (Netcat is obviously not a production solution, but "just my dev box", right?). This way you could continue to use a network-capable version of your server, would only need root/sudo to start proxy (at boot), wouldn't be relying on complex/potentially fragile capabilities.

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1  
Good suggestion. For some reason I didn't even think of using inetd. Except that the service in question is UDP-based, so it's slightly more complicated than TCP services. I have a solution working right now with setcap, but I'll have to give this some thought. –  Jason Creighton Jan 6 '09 at 3:06

Linux supports capabilities to support more fine-grained permissions than just "this application is run as root". One of those capabilities is CAP_NET_BIND_SERVICE which is about binding to a privileged port (<1024).

Unfortunately I don't know how to exploit that to run an application as non-root while still giving it CAP_NET_BIND_SERVICE (probably using setcap, but there's bound to be an existing solution for this).

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My "standard workaround" uses socat as the user-space redirector:

socat tcp6-listen:80,fork tcp6:8080

Beware that this won't scale, forking is expensive but it's the way socat works.

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systemd is a sysvinit replacement which has an option to launch a daemon with specific capabilities. Options Capabilities=, CapabilityBoundingSet= in systemd.exec(5) manpage.

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2  
I previously recommended this answer, but after trying it, now I do not. See my answer for an alternative that still uses systemd. –  Greg Slepak Feb 8 at 23:30

You can setup a local SSH tunnel, eg if you want port 80 to hit your app bound to 3000:

sudo ssh $USERNAME@localhost -L 80:localhost:3000 -N

This has the advantage of working with script servers, and being very simple.

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TLDR: For "the answer" (as I see it), jump down to the >>TLDR<< part in this answer.

OK, I've figured it out (for real this time), the answer to this question, and this answer of mine is also a way of apologizing for promoting another answer (both here and on twitter) that I thought was "the best", but after trying it, discovered that I was mistaken about that. Learn from my mistake kids: don't promote something until you've actually tried it yourself!

Again, I reviewed all the answers here. I've tried some of them (and chose not to try others because I simply didn't like the solutions). I thought that the solution was to use systemd with its Capabilities= and CapabilitiesBindingSet= settings. After wrestling with this for some time, I discovered that this is not the solution because:

Capabilities are intended to restrict root processes!

As the OP wisely stated, it is always best to avoid that (for all your daemons if possible!).

You cannot use the Capabilities related options with User= and Group= in systemd unit files, because capabilities are ALWAYS reset when execev (or whatever the function is) is called. In other words, when systemd forks and drops its perms, the capabilities are reset. There is no way around this, and all that binding logic in the kernel is basic around uid=0, not capabilities. This means that it is unlikely that Capabilities will ever be the right answer to this question (at least any time soon). Incidentally, setcap, as others have mentioned, is not a solution. It didn't work for me, it doesn't work nicely with scripts, and those are reset anyways whenever the file changes.

In my meager defense, I did state (in the comment I've now deleted), that James' iptables suggestion (which the OP also mentions), was the "2nd best solution". :-P

>>TLDR<<

The solution is to combine systemd with on-the-fly iptables commands, like this (taken from DNSChain):

[Unit]
Description=dnschain
After=network.target
Wants=namecoin.service

[Service]
ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/dnschain
Environment=DNSCHAIN_SYSD_VER=0.0.1
PermissionsStartOnly=true
ExecStartPre=/sbin/sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1
ExecStartPre=-/sbin/iptables -D INPUT -p udp --dport 5333 -j ACCEPT
ExecStartPre=-/sbin/iptables -t nat -D PREROUTING -p udp --dport 53 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 5333
ExecStartPre=/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p udp --dport 5333 -j ACCEPT
ExecStartPre=/sbin/iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -p udp --dport 53 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 5333
ExecStopPost=/sbin/iptables -D INPUT -p udp --dport 5333 -j ACCEPT
ExecStopPost=/sbin/iptables -t nat -D PREROUTING -p udp --dport 53 -j REDIRECT --to-ports 5333
User=dns
Group=dns
Restart=always
RestartSec=5
WorkingDirectory=/home/dns
PrivateTmp=true
NoNewPrivileges=true
ReadOnlyDirectories=/etc

# Unfortunately, capabilities are basically worthless because they're designed to restrict root daemons. Instead, we use iptables to listen on privileged ports.
# Capabilities=cap_net_bind_service+pei
# SecureBits=keep-caps

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

Here we accomplish the following:

  • The daemon listens on 5333, but connections are successfully accepted on 53 thanks to iptables
  • We can include the commands in the unit file itself, and thus we save people headaches. systemd cleans up the firewall rules for us, making sure to remove them when the daemon isn't running.
  • We never run as root, and we make privilege escalation impossible (at least systemd claims to), supposedly even if the daemon is compromised and sets uid=0.

iptables is still, unfortunately, quite an ugly and difficult-to-use utility. If the daemon is listening on eth0:0 instead of eth0, for example, the commands are slightly different.

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Nobody should be using old-style aliases like eth0:0 anymore unless they have a really ancient Linux distribution. They have been deprecated for years and will eventually go away. –  Michael Hampton Feb 9 at 16:32
    
Michael, I think you'll find (if you click the link) that I was using eth0:0 as a short way of saying "a public static IP on the same NIC", and in that sense, it is fairly common to see this on VPS setups with extra IPs (for example, SolusVM). –  Greg Slepak Feb 9 at 17:38
    
I think you mean OpenVZ. (SolusVM is a control panel.) And yes, OpenVZ does a lot of things wrong, networking being just one of them. –  Michael Hampton Feb 9 at 17:40
1  
Nah, I mean by SolusVM. From /etc/network/interfaces: # Generated by SolusVM –  Greg Slepak Feb 9 at 18:22
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Thank your for your concise explanation of why I couldn't get my prototype service running with capabilities and a non-root user. I was convinced I was doing something wrong, when it turns out that the capabilities functionality is useless for me! –  Anthony Giorgio Jun 24 at 2:45

At startup:

iptables -A PREROUTING -t nat -i eth0 -p tcp --dport 80 -j REDIRECT --to-port 8080

Then you can bind to the port you forward to.

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does --to-port exist? man iptables only mentions --to-ports (plural). –  Abdull Dec 10 '13 at 0:57
    
ive noticed some differences and i have been jumping around –  James Andino Dec 10 '13 at 16:30
    
See this answer for how to combine this with systemd. –  Greg Slepak Feb 8 at 23:29

Since the OP is just development/testing, less than sleek solutions may be helpful:

setcap can be used on a script's interpreter to grant capabilities to scripts. If setcaps on the global interpreter binary is not acceptable, make a local copy of the binary (any user can) and get root to setcap on this copy. Python2 (at least) works properly with a local copy of the interpreter in your script development tree. No suid is needed so the root user can control to what capabilities users have access.

If you need to track system-wide updates to the interpreter, use a shell script like the following to run your script:

#!/bin/sh
#
#  Watch for updates to the Python2 interpreter

PRG=python_net_raw
PRG_ORIG=/usr/bin/python2.7

cmp $PRG_ORIG $PRG || {
    echo ""
    echo "***** $PRG_ORIG has been updated *****"
    echo "Run the following commands to refresh $PRG:"
    echo ""
    echo "    $ cp $PRG_ORIG $PRG"
    echo "    # setcap cap_net_raw+ep $PRG"
    echo ""
    exit
}

./$PRG $*
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Or patch your kernel and remove the check.

(Option of last resort, not recommended).

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8  
A Very Bad Idea for a multitude of reasons. –  Adam Lassek Jan 5 '09 at 22:25
6  
This is bad idea. But would actually work. And sure made me laugh. –  Oto Brglez Dec 10 '12 at 19:18
7  
Of course it's a bad idea. That's why I said last resort. The point of open source is if it doesn't work the way you want you can change it. –  Joshua Dec 10 '12 at 22:21
    
I'm not sure why you were downvoted. Malware writers don't care what port they listen on, and they are more than happy to open a port greater than 1024. It seems to me that all ports should require privileges, or no ports should require privileges. And requiring root to open a port below 1024 just means you have a high risk application running as root. That seems like a really dumb idea to me. Perhaps I'm missing something here... –  jww Feb 2 at 9:20
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Back in the day, port < 1024 was used in UNIX to UNIX protocols to prove the code running on the other end was running as root. This functioned reasonably well for a set of UNIX servers with common security. –  Joshua Feb 2 at 16:22

There is also the 'djb way'. You can use this method to start your process as root running on any port under tcpserver, then it will hand control of the process to the user you specify immediately after the process starts.

#!/bin/sh

UID=`id -u yourusername`
GID=`id -g yourusername`
exec tcpserver -u $UID -g $GID -RHl0 0 portnumber   /path/to/your/process &

For more info, see: http://thedjbway.b0llix.net/daemontools/uidgid.html

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Use privbind utility: it allows an unprivileged application to bind with reserved ports. enter link description here

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