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a = raw_input('How much is 1 share in that company? ')

while not a.isdigit():
        print "You need to write a number!\n"
        a = raw_input('How much is 1 share in that company? ')

This only works if the user enters an int, but I want it to work even if they enter a float, but not when they enter a str.

So the user should be able to enter both 9 and 9.2, but not abc.

How should I do it?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use regular expressions.

import re

p = re.compile('\d+(\.\d+)?')

a = raw_input('How much is 1 share in that company? ')

while p.match(a) == None:
    print "You need to write a number!\n"
    a = raw_input('How much is 1 share in that company? ')
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3  
Those regular expressions are so damn flexible! Still, dan04's solution feels much more pythonic. Here I define pythonic as "between two solutions of equivalent complexity, prefer the one that doesn't use regular expressions." That still leaves many applications for regular expressions. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 9 '10 at 20:43
    
Alright, thank you very much. This one seems to work perfectly! :D –  Peter Nolan Nov 9 '10 at 21:00
    
@Steven Rumbalski: Yeah, dan04's solution seems more Pythonic, thought mine may actually be less code. –  alpha123 Nov 10 '10 at 1:16
    
@Peter Nolan: No problem. Feel free to mark it as the answer then. :) –  alpha123 Nov 10 '10 at 1:16
    
as Peter accepted your answer without really accepting it, i'll +1. –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 10 '10 at 1:24

EAFP

try:
    x = float(a)
except ValueError:
    print("You must enter a number")
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4  
EAFP = Easier to Ask for Forgiveness than Permission (see docs.python.org/glossary.html) –  Steven Rumbalski Nov 9 '10 at 20:29
    
@Steven Rumbaski Although I prefer the form: "It's easier to beg for forgiveness than ask permission" :-) –  user166390 Nov 9 '10 at 20:37
    
Alright, so is there a simple way to also check to make sure the user does not enter a negative value? –  Peter Nolan Nov 9 '10 at 20:52
    
Also, I tried using that but it only works once, if you try and enter a letter or a str more than once you still get an error.. –  Peter Nolan Nov 9 '10 at 20:56
1  
Well it depends how you're implementing it... –  Falmarri Nov 9 '10 at 21:21

The existing answers are correct in that the more Pythonic way is usually to try...except (i.e. EAFP).

However, if you really want to do the validation, you could remove exactly 1 decimal point before using isdigit().

>>> "124".replace(".", "", 1).isdigit()
True
>>> "12.4".replace(".", "", 1).isdigit()
True
>>> "12..4".replace(".", "", 1).isdigit()
False
>>> "192.168.1.1".replace(".", "", 1).isdigit()
False

Notice that this does not treat floats any different from ints however. You could add that check if you really need it though.

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@dan04 has the right basic idea, unfortunately the real world is often a special case and requires additional coding to handle it better -- so here's a more elaborate and a bit more realistic example:

import sys

while True:
    try:
        a = raw_input('How much is 1 share in that company? ')
        x = float(a)
        # validity check(s)
        if x < 0: raise ValueError('share price must be positive')
    except ValueError, e:
        print "ValueError: '{}'".format(e)
        print "Please try entering it again..."
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        sys.exit("\n<terminated by user>")
    except:
        exc_value = sys.exc_info()[1]
        exc_class = exc_value.__class__.__name__
        print "{} exception: '{}'".format(exc_class, exc_value)
        sys.exit("<fatal error encountered>")
    else:
        break # out of loop

print "Share price entered:", x

You could remove the else: and move the break to the end of the try: suite if you preferred.

Sample usage:

> python numeric_input.py
How much is 1 share in that company? abc
ValueError: 'could not convert string to float: abc'
Please try entering it again...
How much is 1 share in that company? -1
ValueError: 'share price must be positive'
Please try entering it again...
How much is 1 share in that company? 9
Share price entered: 9.0

> python numeric_input.py
How much is 1 share in that company? 9.2
Share price entered: 9.2
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