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A while back I asked our developers to use rebase instead of merge before pushing. Eliminating trivial merges makes for a much easier to follow commit graph (ie: gitk, git log).

Sometimes folks still accidentally do trivial merges, then push. Does anyone have handy or have tips for writing a server-side hook that blocks trivial merges?

By "trivial merge", I mean a merge without conflicts. Here's an example, and here's a better explanation of a trivial merge in git.

Update Wed Nov 10 01:26:41 UTC 2010: great comments, all! Thank you.

  • Here's what I'm trying to avoid. It really is hard to follow!
  • Consider the following: all I'm really asking folks to do is this:
    • if git pull --ff-only fails, do git pull --rebase instead of git pull
  • git.git only has one or two committers, right? In theory, it should be easy to follow the commit graph, but it looks pretty messy to me.

Update Thu Nov 11 23:49:35 UTC 2010:

Update Wed Dec 15 18:34:52 UTC 2010:

  • adymitruk is close! Just one case is still unresolved: non-trivial merges must still work.
  • A rather complete test suite is available, check it out.
  • I asked for help on a (the?) git mailing list.
share|improve this question
    
How do you define "trivial merge?" How do you expect to be able to differentiate between trivial merges and non-trivial merges? –  cdhowie Nov 9 '10 at 20:35
    
I added that, starting with By "trivial merge"... –  Adam Monsen Nov 9 '10 at 20:39
2  
There are lots of arguments against rebasing instead of merging. Personally I'd hate to be forced to rebase. Just sayin ;) –  August Lilleaas Nov 9 '10 at 20:45
    
well, you cannot know the difference between a trivial 'pull'-merge and a merge without conflicts of a topic/feature branch. –  knittl Nov 9 '10 at 20:49
2  
As August says, you should really think twice about doing this. Your standard for whether a merge is necessary (presence of conflicts) makes little sense. You can resolve merge conflicts in a merge or a rebase, and you can combine content without conflicts using a merge or a rebase. What matters is the history of the commits. If what you want to do is "incorporate the work done on this feature branch" then the way to represent that is a merge. Merges do not have to make history hard to follow - look at git.git. –  Jefromi Nov 9 '10 at 21:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I came across this piece of code, while trying to find a solution. It doesn't do exactly what you want, but it should be ez to add extra branch names on the if statement.

Works for me, so far. it forces pull --rebase for the same branch and lets regular merges with other branches go through.

All credits go to the original author.

#!/bin/bash
#
# This git update hook will refuse unnecessary merge commits caused by pulling
# from being pushed to a shared repository. These commits make following the
# history of a project difficult and are always avoidable with rebasing.
#
# by Scott Kyle (appden)
# modified by Olivier Refalo (orefalo)

refname="$1"
oldrev="$2"
newrev="$3"

# if this is not run as a hook, you may have messed up
if [ -z "$GIT_DIR" -o -z "$refname" -o -z "$oldrev" -o -z "$newrev" ]; then
    echo "Usage: GIT_DIR=<path> $0 <ref> <oldrev> <newrev>" >&2
    exit 1
fi

# if the new revision is all 0's then it's a commit to delete a ref
zero="0000000000000000000000000000000000000000"
# also check if the new revision is not a commit or is not a fast forward
# detect branch deletion, branch creation... and more
if [ "${refname#refs/heads/}" = "master" ] || [ "$newrev" = "$zero" ] || [ "$oldrev" = "$zero" ] || [ $(git cat-file -t $newrev) != "co
mmit" ] || [ $(git merge-base $oldrev $newrev) != "$oldrev" ]; then
    exit 0
fi

# loop through merges in the push only following first parents
for merge in $(git rev-list --first-parent --merges $oldrev..$newrev --); do
    # lazily create the revision list of this branch prior to the push
    [ -z "$revlist" ] && revlist=$(git rev-list $oldrev)
    # check if the second parent of the merge is already in this branch
    if grep -q $(git rev-parse $merge^2) <<< "$revlist"; then
        cat >&2 <<-EOF
            *** PUSH REJECTED ***
            *** TRIVIAL merge detected on local branch ${refname#refs/heads/}
            *** To fix: git rebase origin/${refname#refs/heads/}
            ***
            *** Next time use: git pull --rebase
            ***
            *** Permanent fix: git config [--global] branch.autosetuprebase always
            *** Then for existing branches: git config branch.<name>.rebase true
        EOF
        exit 1
    fi
done

echo -Info- Clean history successfully preserved!
exit 0
share|improve this answer
1  
This blocks nontrivial merges too. See gist.github.com/737842 . I added this code to that gist, just type "make" to run tests. –  Adam Monsen Jan 24 '12 at 5:04
    
When deployed on the server(update hook) it forces users into 'pull --rebase'. A regular merge from another branch works fine, but from the same branch will fail on a trivial merge –  Olivier Refalo Jan 24 '12 at 5:10
    
Ah, I see. Sorry, should have read your description more thoroughly. When I posted this question a year ago, I think I was looking for something that would allow a nontrivial merge from origin/master to master, so folks could still do merges. I ran into several integrations in my old job (working on Mifos) where rebasing was difficult but merging was easy. Now that I'm more comfortable with rebase, I'd probably use the update script you presented. Let's close the book on this one. You win! –  Adam Monsen Jan 24 '12 at 5:21

This update hook will check if you are pushing to specific branches (it allows trivial merges in wip, topic and other branches).

This does not bother with the rest of the parents on octopus merges as it only references the 2nd parent in each merge commit being pushed. Please feel free to update the script.

UPDATE: Reserved branches are required to exist on the remote.

#!/bin/bash
refname="$1"
oldrev="$2"
newrev="$3"
branches="refs/heads/hotfixes refs/heads/dev refs/heads/qa refs/heads/master"
cont="no"
for branch in $branches ; do
  if [[ $refname == $branch ]] ; then
    cont="yes"
  fi
done
if [[ $cont == "no" ]] ; then
  exit 0
fi
echo "inspecting branch $refname for trivial merges" >&2
hashes="$(git log --format=%H --merges $oldrev..$newrev)"
for hash in $hashes ; do
  echo "checking merge commit $hash" >&2
  cont="no"
  for branch in $branches ; do
    if [[ $refname == $branch ]] ; then
      continue
    fi
    # if [[ "$(git log --format=%H $hash^2 ^$branch | wc -l)" == "0" ]] ; then
    if [[ "$(git log --format=%H $hash^2 ^$branch | wc -l)" == "    0" ]] ; then
      cont="yes"
    fi
  done
  if [[ $cont == "no" ]] ; then
    echo "No trivial merges allowed. Please rebase and push again." >&2
    exit 1
  fi
done
exit 0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'll give this a shot, and mark as the accepted answer if I can get it working. –  Adam Monsen Nov 10 '10 at 1:39
    
@adymitruk - You should use && instead of AND. It would also benefit from some line breaks inside the [[ and ]]. –  bstpierre Nov 10 '10 at 13:35
    
Agreed.. this was more pseudo code. Please suggest a replacement for the if condition and I'll edit the response. –  Adam Dymitruk Nov 10 '10 at 22:36
    
Doesn't work for me as a pre-receive hook, even after replacing AND with &&, removing some linebreaks, and using bash's =~ operator for regex matches. I made a local repo, cloned it and did a trivial merge on the "qa" branch, but I was still able to push the trivial merge back to origin. Here's what I've got so far: pastey.net/142760 / gist.github.com/673438 –  Adam Monsen Nov 11 '10 at 23:28
    
Sorry. This is meant as an update hook. If you are using gitolite, make sure you use update.secondary and use the installer to push the change through. I'll update the answer to specify which hook. –  Adam Dymitruk Nov 12 '10 at 23:04

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