Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given a specific set of strings, what's the best way to map them to a corresponding set of integers? Say I have a class with a few integer constants that I use internally, but need to take incoming external strings and determine the correct corresponding integer constant they map to.

Here's a simplified example:

public class Example {
    public static final int ITEM_APPLE = 0;
    public static final int ITEM_BANANA = 1;
    public static final int ITEM_GRAPE = 3;

    public void incomingData(String value) {
        // Possible values would be "apple", "banana", and "grape" in this case.
    }
}

What would the most appropriate approach be to go from that value to its corresponding integer constant? A HashMap? Or is ther any way to define these mappings in a static member? Another idea?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would use a HashMap as that is closest to what you want to achieve, and therefore a maintainable solution. You can define a static HashMap:

Class Example {
    public static final int ITEM_APPLE = 0;
    public static final int ITEM_BANANA = 1;
    public static final int ITEM_GRAPE = 3;

    private static final Map<String, Integer> fruitCodes = new HashMap<String, Integer>();

    static {
        fruitCodes.put("apple", ITEM_APPLE);
        fruitCodes.put("banana", ITEM_BANANA);
        // ...
    }


    public void incomingData(String value) {
        // Possible values would be "apple", "banana", and "grape" in this case.
        Integer code = fruitCodes(value);

        if (null == code) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Forbidden fruit: " + value);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm accepting this answer because it makes for the best solution to my particular case. All other valid answers will at least get an up-vote from me. –  Wilco Nov 9 '10 at 23:47

Yes, use an enum. You can assign each enum an integer value, or just use ordinal()

public enum ExampleEnum {
    ITEM_APPLE(0), ITEM_BANANA(1), ITEM_GRAPE(3);

    private final int intValue;

    private ExampleEnum (int intValue) {
      this.intValue = intValue;
    }

    public int intValue() {
      return intValue;
    }
}

then use e.g. ExampleEnum.valueOf("ITEM_APPLE").intValue() to resolve String to int.

If the int values are sequential and zero-based, you can get rid of the intValue field altogether:

public enum ExampleEnum {
    ITEM_APPLE, ITEM_BANANA, ITEM_GRAPE;
}

and just use ExampleEnum.valueOf("ITEM_APPLE").ordinal()

share|improve this answer
    
But given my example, how could I get Example.ITEM_APPLE if given the string "apple"? –  Wilco Nov 9 '10 at 21:17
1  
Or to better illustrate, what if I had "4pple" as the value and knew that corresponded to ITEM_APPLE? How could I translate between? –  Wilco Nov 9 '10 at 21:19
    
@Wilco: The simplest option is to give the enum constants the same name as the strings you want to use.. Alternatively, pass the "apple" string as another constructor argument, and keep that in a static Map of string values to enum values. That's starting to get cumbersome, though. –  skaffman Nov 9 '10 at 21:20

you 'could' use reflection eg:

Example.class.getField("ITEM_" + input.toUpperCase()).getInt(null);

however, you should consider using Enums or if there aren't too many possibilities just use a set of else if statements...

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense, but you're right about the 'could' part. Also, in my case, the incoming strings can't always map straight the ending part of a constant (i.e. "ITEM_" + string) (think of that more as coincidence) –  Wilco Nov 9 '10 at 21:14
    
then you're going to have to write some custom mapping logic. you could either build up a hash of the possibilities, or test the range of names for how well they match the input etc ... many choices, none of them 100% correct. –  pstanton Nov 9 '10 at 21:39

I also suggest an Enum method, although ExampleEnum.valueOf("ITEM_APPLE").ordinal() will have to do string comparisons to get to the answer while a HashMap will give you an O(1) complexity.

Probably a dangerous idea but just for fun (how about this):

class Example {
    public static final int ITEM_APPLE = "apple".hashCode();
    public static final int ITEM_BANANA = "banana".hashCode();
    public static final int ITEM_GRAPE = "grape".hashCode();

    public int incomingData(String value) {
        return value.hashCode();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Example x = new Example();
        if (ITEM_APPLE == x.incomingData("apple"))
            System.out.println("ITEM_APPLE");
    }
    }
}

You just have to ensure the string value's hash codes does not clash ;-)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.