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public class NHibernateSessionPerRequest<T>:IHttpModule
{
    public void Dispose() { }

    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        context.BeginRequest += BeginRequest;
        context.EndRequest += EndRequest;
    }
}

How can it be registered in web.config?

share|improve this question
    
What would T be at runtime? – James Gregory Nov 10 '10 at 9:09
    
It can be any type of repository classes. – cinek Nov 11 '10 at 14:42
    
So you're going to have a session-per-request-per-repository? – James Gregory Nov 26 '10 at 9:11
up vote 4 down vote accepted

IIS6 : In the system.web section of your web.config

<configuration>
  <system.web>
    <httpModules>
      <add name="MyModule" type="My.Namespace.NHibernateSessionPerRequest`1[[My.Namespace.MyType, My.Assembly]], My.Assembly"/>
    </httpModules>
  </system.web>
</configuration>

IIS7 : In the system.webserver section of your web.config :

<configuration>
  <system.webServer>
    <modules>
      <add name="MyModule" type="My.Namespace.NHibernateSessionPerRequest`1[[My.Namespace.MyType, My.Assembly]], My.Assembly"/>
    </modules>
  </system.webServer>
</configuration>

For both, replace "My.Namespace" with the namespace of the class, and "My.Assembly" with the assembly name.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that this addresses the problem of the module type being generic. Both of your config samples show a non-generic type being registered. – Eilon Nov 9 '10 at 21:31
    
This code wont work with generic classes – cinek Nov 9 '10 at 21:33
    
yup, didn't see it when I was writing it. Corrected now – mathieu Nov 9 '10 at 21:33
    
So I'd have to register actual types. This seams to be similar to Eilon's solution. Ideally would be if I didn't have to create non generic IHttpModule for every existing type. – cinek Nov 9 '10 at 21:46
    
Both solutions have advantages. Here you don't need to create derived type of you HttpModule. – mathieu Nov 9 '10 at 21:51

The easiest solution is to create a concrete type that derives from this type, and then register that:

public class MyActualModule : NHibernateSessionPerRequest<SomeType> {
}

Then in web.config register MyActualModule.

Alternatively, you can use the CLR-compliant syntax for generic types, but it's so awful that I won't even mention it here. Even a simple type like yours will have a type name that's probably over 100 chars long.

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