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I have some code that looks like the following coming back from an XHR response:

jQuery(':text:not(:hidden)').removeAttr("disabled");

This is a result of input fields being disabled after form submit. The XHR response returns this tidbit of jQuery and re-enables controls. Works great on every browser, even "partially" on FF 3.6.1 OSX. What I mean by partially is that some text fields have the disabled attribute removed, others do not. These text fields are verified not hidden.

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You should really use jQuery('input:text:not(:hidden)'), it's much quicker according to the jQuery docs. As for your problem, I don't see why it shouldn't work in principle, but right now I don't have FF 3.6.1 to try it. –  MartinodF Nov 9 '10 at 21:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Have a go using this instead:

jQuery('input:text:visible').each(function(){
    this.disabled = false;
});

This uses the disabled property of the element directly, rather than messing around with jQuery wrappers.

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1  
Go you. Not that I don't have this problem, but jquery has helped a lot of people forget how to write native javascript. –  Jage Nov 9 '10 at 22:11
    
Finally, sanity. jQuery has a lot to answer for, not least the near universal confusion amongst jQuery users about the difference between attributes and properties. –  Tim Down Nov 10 '10 at 0:49
    
Had this issue in IE (.removeAttr("disabled"); worked on FF). This 'this.disabled' worked well for both browsers :-) –  Dror Sep 16 '11 at 4:08

Did you try something like:

jQuery('input[type=text]:visible').removeAttr("disabled");
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Unfortunately didn't do the trick either. –  randombits Nov 9 '10 at 21:51

Instead try:

jQuery(':text:not(:hidden)').attr("disabled",'');
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2  
It doesn't seem to be the cleanest solution, since in HTML5 the disabled (and other similar) attribute can have any value (even an empty string) and still be valid (<input type="text" disabled />, <input type="text" disabled="" /> will both be disabled) –  MartinodF Nov 9 '10 at 21:51
    
This just ended up disabling all of my text input controls. –  randombits Nov 9 '10 at 21:51
    
Good to know, thanks @MartinodF. –  Daniel Nov 9 '10 at 21:59

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