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To be specific, I was trying this code:

package hello;

public class Hello {

    Clock clock = new Clock();

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        clock.sayTime();
    }
}

But it gave the error 'Cannot access non-static field in static method main'. So I changed the declaration of clock to this:

static Clock clock = new Clock();

And it worked. What does it mean to put that keyword before the declaration? What exactly will it do and/or restrict in terms of what can be done to that object?

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14 Answers 14

up vote 200 down vote accepted

static members belong to the class instead of a specific instance.

It means that only one instance of a static field exists[1] even if you create a million instances of the class or you don't create any. It will be shared by all instances.

Since static methods also do not belong to a specific instance, they can't refer to instance members (how would you know which instance Hello class you want to refer to?). static members can only refer to static members. Instance members can, of course access static members.

Side note: Of course, static members can access instance members through an object reference.

[1]: Depending on the runtime characteristics, it can be one per ClassLoader or AppDomain or thread, but that is beside the point.

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2  
In .NET, you can also modify this behavior using the [ThreadStatic] attribute - which makes the static local to particular threads. –  TheSoftwareJedi Jan 5 '09 at 18:44
    
So static is like javascripts prototype? –  Murplyx Jul 31 at 15:49

It means that there is only one instance of "clock" in Hello, not one per instance of Hello. So if you were to do a "new Hello" anywhere in your code, in the first instance (without the "static"), it would make a new clock, but in the second instance, it would still use the original "clock".

Unless you needed "clock" somewhere outside of main, this would work just as well:

package hello;
public class Hello
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
      Clock clock=new Clock();
      clock.sayTime();    
    }
}
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This is the more usual way of doing it. The main() routine should be self-contained. –  Jason S Jan 5 '09 at 17:53
    
In the second instance it would create a new instance of Clock each time the main method is called, right? –  Click Upvote Jan 5 '09 at 18:03
    
In the second instance, clock static, it would only create it once. In my example, where clock is within the main, then yes, it would create it new every time main is called. But normally main is only called once on program start, and when it exits, everything is free-ed. –  Paul Tomblin Jan 5 '09 at 18:30
    
@PaulTomblin I truly wish I could understand what you're saying.. by this time next month if I don't understand, I'll be failing my exam! :) –  user2776866 Oct 31 '13 at 6:34

The static keyword means that something (a field, method or inner class) is related to the type rather than any particular instance of the type. So for example, one calls Math.sin(...) without any instance of the Math class, and indeed you can't create an instance of the Math class.

For more information, see the relevant bit of Sun's Java Tutorial.


Sidenote

Java unfortunately allows you to access static members as if they were instance members, e.g.

// Bad code!
Thread.currentThread().sleep(5000);
someOtherThread.sleep(5000);

That makes it look as if sleep is an instance method, but it's actually a static method - it always makes the current thread sleep. It's better practice to make this clear in the calling code:

// Clearer
Thread.sleep(5000);
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8  
+1 for mentioning that it is bad, that calling from an instance-variable is allowed. –  Mnementh Jul 4 '09 at 7:17

The static keyword in Java means that the variable or function is shared between all instances of that class as it belongs to the type, not the actual objects themselves.

So if you have a variable: private static int i = 0; and you increment it (i++) in one instance, the change will be reflected in all instances. i will now be 1 in all instances.

Static methods can be used without instantiating an object.

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1  
"Shared between all instances" gives the wrong impression, IMO - it suggests that you do need to have an instance of the object. –  Jon Skeet Jul 4 '09 at 6:33
    
(Whereas really there don't need to be any instances, because the static field etc belongs to the type.) –  Jon Skeet Jul 4 '09 at 6:33
    
will edit, thanks –  geowa4 Jul 4 '09 at 6:45

This discussion has so far ignored classloader considerations. Strictly speaking, Java static fields are shared between all instances of a class for a given classloader.

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This was mentioned by Apocalisp in the comments on Merhdad's answer. –  Zach Langley Jan 5 '09 at 19:43
    
Good point. Many people don't know this, but once you start messing with classloaders, it becomes very important. –  sleske Oct 2 '09 at 14:47

It means you don't have to have an instance of the class to use the method. So in your example, you could call:

Hello.main(new String[]())

directly, instead of:

Hello h = new Hello();
h.main(new String[]());

Edit

From inside a static method (one belonging only to the class) you cannot access any members which are not static, since their values depend on your instantiation of the class. So Clock, which is an instance member, would have a different value/reference for each instance of your Hello class, and therefore you could not access it from the static portion of the class.

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He wasn't asking about the static in front of "main", he was asking about "static Clock" –  Paul Tomblin Jan 5 '09 at 17:46
    
There is no static in front of Clock. –  Elie Jan 5 '09 at 17:47
    
Try reading the whole question, not the first two lines. –  Paul Tomblin Jan 5 '09 at 17:48
    
Did, and updated the answer. –  Elie Jan 5 '09 at 17:49

static methods don't use any instance variables of the class they are defined in. A very good explanation of the difference can be found on this page

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A field can be assigned to either the class or an instance of a class. By default fields are instance variables. By using static the field becomes a class variable, thus there is one and only one clock. If you make a changes in one place, it's visible everywhere. Instance varables are changed independently of one another.

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Once again remember that there is one instance of a static per class per CLASSLOADER.

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Static makes the clock member a class member instead of an instance member. Without the static keyword you would need to create an instance of the Hello class (which has a clock member variable) - e.g.

Hello hello = new Hello();
hello.clock.sayTime();
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I have developed a liking for static methods (only, if possible) in "helper" classes.

The calling class need not create another member (instance) variable of the helper class. You just call the methods of the helper class. Also the helper class is improved because you no longer need a constructor, and you need no member (instance) variables.

There are probably other advantages.

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Can also think of static members not having a "this" pointer. They are shared among all instances.

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Basic usage of static methods...

public class Hello
{
    public static String do(String s)
    {
      // s calculation here
      return s;
    }
    public String doMore(String s)
    {
      // s calculation here
      return s;
    }
}


String s = Hello.do(string);
Hello hello = new Hello();
String s = hello.doMore(string);
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The keyword static is used to denote a field or a method as belonging to the class itself and not the instance. Using your code, if the object Clock is static, all of the instances of the Hello class will share this Clock data member (field) in common. If you make it non-static, each individual instance of Hello can have a unique Clock field.

The problem is that you added a main method to your class Hello so that you could run the code. The problem here is that the main method is static and as such, it cannot refer to non-static fields or methods inside of it. You can resolve this in two ways:

  1. Make all fields and methods of the Hello class static so that they could be referred to inside the main method. This is really not a good thing to do (or the wrong reason t make a field and/or a method static)
  2. Create an instance of your Hello class inside the main method and access all it's fields and methods the way they were intended to in the first place.

For you, this means the following change to your code:

package hello;

public class Hello {

    private Clock clock = new Clock();

    public Clock getClock() {
        return clock;
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Hello hello = new Hello();
        hello.getClock().sayTime();
    }
}
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