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I want a 0 to be considered as an integer and a '0' to be considered as a string but empty() considers the '0' as a string in the example below,

$var = '0';

// Evaluates to true because $var is empty
if (empty($var)) {
    echo '$var is empty';
}

how can I 'make' empty() to take '0's as strings?

thanks.

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1  
You might find this useful: php.net/manual/en/types.comparisons.php –  zzzzBov Nov 9 '10 at 22:28
    
thank you very much! –  tealou Nov 9 '10 at 23:13
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10 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot make it. That is how it was designed. Instead you can write an and statement to test:

if (empty($var) && $var !== '0') {
    echo $var . ' is empty';
}

You could use isset, unless of course, you want it to turn away the other empties, that empty checks for.

Edit

Fixed the check to do a type check as well, thanks to the 2371 for pointing that out :)

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2  
& $var != '0' This is wrong: 0 == '0' in PHP. Use ===. –  2371 Nov 9 '10 at 22:29
    
!== that is.... –  Viper_Sb Nov 9 '10 at 22:30
    
Either or its been fixed above. –  Brad F Jacobs Nov 9 '10 at 22:32
    
thank you very much! –  tealou Nov 9 '10 at 23:10
    
Beware, if $var is undefined, you get "undefined variable" errors with code like this. –  Double Gras Feb 15 '13 at 17:25
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You cannot with empty. From the PHP Manual:

The following things are considered to be empty:

  • "" (an empty string)
  • 0 (0 as an integer)
  • "0" (0 as a string)
  • NULL
  • FALSE
  • array() (an empty array)
  • var $var; (a variable declared, but without a value in a class)

You have to add an additional other check.

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You can't with only empty(). See the manual. You can do this though:

if ($var !== '0' && empty($var)) {
   echo "$var is empty and is not string '0'";
}

Basically, empty() does the same as:

if (!$var) ...

But doesn't trigger a PHP Notice when the variable is not set.

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thank you very much! –  tealou Nov 9 '10 at 23:13
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You can't. From the manual

Returns FALSE if var has a non-empty and non-zero value.

The following things are considered to be empty:

  • "" (an empty string)
  • 0 (0 as an integer)
  • "0" (0 as a string)
  • NULL
  • FALSE
  • array() (an empty array)
  • var $var; (a variable declared, but without a value in a class)
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In both of your cases empty() will return true. Check the doc - http://php.net/empty.

I suggest using a different function to match your spec.

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$var = '0';

// Evaluates to true because $var is empty
if (empty($var) && $var !== '0') {
    echo '$var is empty or the string "0"';
}
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thank you very much! –  tealou Nov 9 '10 at 23:11
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empty is by far the most confusing and useless function in the php repertoire. Don't use it.

There are three separate things you want to know when checking a value.

  • the value exists (use isset)
  • the value has a specific type (use is_xxx)
  • the value has specific properties (use comparison operators, strpos or regular expressions).

(the last two can be combined into one with typecasts or '===').

Examples:

if(isset($var) && is_string($var) && strlen($var) > 0)...
if(isset($var) && intval($var) > 0)...
if(isset($var) && $var === '0')...

This seems more verbose, but shows clearly what you're doing. For structural objects it often makes sense to have a shortcut getter, e.g.

 /// get a string
 function s($ary, $key, $default = '') {
     if(!isset($ary[$key])) return $default;
     $s = trim($ary[$key]);
     return strlen($s) ? $s : $default;
 }
 /// get a natural number
 function n($ary, $key, $default = 0) {
     $n = intval(s($ary, $key));
     return $n > 0 ? $n : $default;
 }

 $name = s($_POST, 'name');
 $age  = n($_POST, 'age');
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this is great thank you! –  tealou Nov 9 '10 at 23:10
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In this case don't use empty, use isset() in place of it. This will also allow 0 as an integer.

$var = '0';
if (!isset($var)) {
    print '$var is not set';
}

$var = 0;
if (!isset($var)) {
    print '$var is not set';
}

Neither should print anything.

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I always add to my codebase

function is_blank($value) {
    return empty($value) && !is_numeric($value);
}

and use it instead of empty(). It solves the issue of keeping zeros (int, float or string) as non-empty.

See http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.empty.php#103756 which was added May 2011.

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if ( (is_array($var) && empty($var)) || strlen($var) === 0 ) { echo $var . ' is empty'; }

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As this does much more than the OP asked for, a short explaination would greatly improve your answer. –  RandomSeed Mar 1 at 16:01
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