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I have a simple problem that deals with math operators.

Suppose I have something like

3//4

4 -- 3

Would the result be 12 for the first one and 1 for the second one?

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2  
what are // and -- ? are they some sort of special operators? if so what language is this? in just about any language I would expect that 4 -- 3 = 4 - (-3) = 7.. but // is not generally defined (except as a the start of a comment) –  James Gaunt Nov 9 '10 at 22:32
    
The / is division and - is minus. –  Steffan Harris Nov 9 '10 at 22:34
    
Possibly 7 for the second, assuming 4 -- 3 means -3 subtracted from 4; but no idea what the // operator is –  Mark Baker Nov 9 '10 at 22:34
    
if / is division then // is meaningless, and 4 -- 3 = 7... for the first maybe you want 3/(1/4) = 12 –  James Gaunt Nov 9 '10 at 22:35
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I don't know if this is the same question/joke, but I've seen "what does 3//4 evaluate to?" with the answer being 3 since // was to be interpreted as starting a comment. –  Evan Huddleston Nov 9 '10 at 23:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Neither // nor -- have generally accepted meanings. The expression 4 -- 3 can be interpreted as 4-(-3) = 7, because we have the general agreement that 0-3 can be written "-3", without the zero.

In order to interpret 3//4 as 12, one would have to have an analogous agreement that "1/4" could be written without the 1, as in "/4". Then just as 4--3 can be read as 4-(0-3), 3//4 can be read as 3/(/4) = 3/(1/4) = 12.

I have never seen anyone use this division convention, and there are some good reasons not to do this.

  1. You don't gain any expressive power, except the freedom to omit a numerator 1.
  2. The "/" symbol now has two syntactic forms, one unary and one binary
  3. Reading expressions gets harder and the notation interacts with implicit multiplication syntax. For example, /(ab) = /a/b could mean 1/(ab) = 1/a * 1/b (true) or could mean 1/(ab) = 1/(a/b) (false).

On the other hand, it might be an interesting academic exercise to explore the consequences -- intended or not -- of such an invention.

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'The "/" symbol now has two syntactic forms, one unary and one binary' - not necessarily. It could be considered solely unary, with the binary form subsumed by the conventional juxtaposition-as-multiplication. E.g., 3/4 = 3 * (/4). –  mokus Nov 9 '10 at 23:03
    
@mokus Very good point. I guess I was being "old-fashioned" to insist that a two-input division operation should continue to exist. –  Josephine Nov 9 '10 at 23:24

The first would probably be a syntax error, and the second would probably be 7 = 4 - (-3) = 4 + 3 = 7

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But what if im not doing it in a program language? –  Steffan Harris Nov 9 '10 at 22:36
    
// has no generally agreed meaning in maths... so you can make it mean what you want –  James Gaunt Nov 9 '10 at 22:38

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