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talking about java performance .. what is better? if..else or multiple simple if

if( condition ) {
  some_code;
  return value;
}
else if( condition ) {
  some_code;
  return value;
}
else if( condition ) {
  some_code;
  return value;
}
else {
  some_code;
  return value;
}

or

if( condition ) {
  some_code;
  return value;
}

if( condition ) {
  some_code;
  return value;
}

if( condition ) {
  some_code;
  return value;
}

some_code;    
return value;

Interested in your thoughts

Thnx !

share|improve this question
    
If there is a performance difference, it is probably negligible. –  Felix Kling Nov 9 '10 at 22:48
4  
I'm no expert, but I'd be surprised if there were any difference -- but the answer to all performance questions is "try it yourself and see". (And the other answer is "this probably isn't your bottleneck.") This looks like a style question to me. –  Jefromi Nov 9 '10 at 22:49
    
No matter "some_code", only how java execute "if" statement –  dnlmax Nov 9 '10 at 22:52
    
You could also opt to have a single return at the end of the if...else if.. example. –  Jeremy Heiler Nov 10 '10 at 0:01
    
assume that return values could be differents –  dnlmax Nov 10 '10 at 1:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There is no difference, performance-wise. Choose the most readable option, which could be either depending on what the code does.

In general do not worry about these micro-optimizations. Optimization should only come after you've determined there is a performance problem that needs to be fixed.

"We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil." —Donald Knuth

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for "do not worry about µ-opt" –  Donal Fellows Nov 9 '10 at 22:51
2  
jeje, great quote ! –  dnlmax Nov 9 '10 at 22:59

The if...else example you give doesn't need the returns if this is in a function with no return value. In that case, the if...else will be easier to read.

Furthermore, the if...else should be preferred because it makes explicit that these cases are mutually exclusive.

If there's a performance difference here, then your compiler/interpreter sucks.

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If there's a performance difference, then the compiler sucks. –  starblue Nov 10 '10 at 6:45
    
Could be the interpreter, for an interpreted language. –  uckelman Nov 10 '10 at 9:09

I'm confident a single if would be better, because whenever a true condition is encountered, it can safely skip the other else alternatives since they won't be executed. If you used multiple ifs, all the subsequent conditions would have to be evaluated anyway (even if, like I think you're supposing, they would be mutually exclusive).

share|improve this answer
    
But in the example they're not going to get executed anyway because the function returns before they're reached. –  Andrew Cooper Nov 9 '10 at 22:50
    
Does not make a difference in this example anyways, as there is a return statement in every if body. –  Felix Kling Nov 9 '10 at 22:51
    
But it can do that anyway due to the 'return' construct form. –  user166390 Nov 9 '10 at 22:51
    
Yes, but if "better" == 1ms faster, who's going to notice? –  Michael Todd Nov 9 '10 at 22:51
    
Missed the returns. There shouldn't be any significant performance difference then. Go for readability of the code ;) –  MartinodF Nov 9 '10 at 22:52

Depends on the situation.

If the conditions are mutually exclusive, use else. This will cause Java to not check any of the conditions after the one that is found to be true.

If they are not mutually exclusive, then using a list of if without else could cause multiple cases to occur.

In your case, with returns in each, the performance will be the same because the same number of comparisons will need to be done no matter what.

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It won't make any difference whether the conditions are mutually exclusive. (It would make a if there wasn't a return in each 'then' clause ...) –  Stephen C Nov 9 '10 at 23:33

I would not worry about performance here as much as code readability and maintainability. As was mentioned, the performance will be essentially identical after the code is compiled.

It is my preference to be more explicit about my conditions, instead of allowing behavior to implicitly "fall through".

Also, the single if will not be evaluated any faster than the if else. The else path will never be checked if the case is true.

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