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I am looking to do this in C/C++.

I came across Variable Length Arguments but this suggests a solution with Python & C using libffi.

Now, if I want to wrap printf function with myprintf

What I do is like below:

void myprintf(char* fmt, ...)
{
    va_ list args;
    va_ start(args,fmt);
    printf(fmt,args);
    va_ end(args);
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int a = 9;
    int b = 10;
    char v = 'C';
    myprintf("This is a number: %d and \nthis is a character: %c and \n another number: %d\n",a, v, b);
    return 0;
}

But the results are not as expected!

This is a number: 1244780 and
this is a character: h and
another number: 29953463

Any point where did I miss??

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1  
The answer for this question is very different now that C++11 is out. –  Mooing Duck Mar 4 '13 at 22:01
    
@MooingDuck Indeed, I added a Variadic templates answer, do you think there is a nicer way in C++11? –  Shafik Yaghmour Jul 24 '13 at 14:47
    
@MooingDuck A vararg function is not a variadic template function. They are different in nature and type. –  rubenvb Jul 24 '13 at 15:05
1  
@rubenvb In this case I don't think the distinction matters, almost all references I have seen tout them as a direct replacement for variadic function: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/variadic So I would be curious to understand the distinction you see in this case. –  Shafik Yaghmour Jul 24 '13 at 15:17
    
@shafik: how about the obvious code bloat for each instantiation? How about passing function pointers? There are some distinctions you need to be aware of. I'm not saying you shouldn't, I'm just saying no one deprecated variadic functions. –  rubenvb Jul 24 '13 at 18:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 50 down vote accepted

the problem is that you cannot use 'printf' with va_args. You must use vprintf if you are using variable argument lists. vprint, vsprintf, vfprintf, etc. (there are also 'safe' versions in Microsoft's C runtime that will prevent buffer overruns, etc.)

You sample works as follows:

void myprintf(char* fmt, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args,fmt);
    vprintf(fmt,args);
    va_end(args);
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int a = 9;
    int b = 10;
    char v = 'C'; 
    myprintf("This is a number: %d and \nthis is a character: %c and \n another number: %d\n",a, v, b);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

I am also unsure what you mean by pure

In C++ we use

#include <cstdarg>
#include <cstdio>

class Foo
{   void Write(const char* pMsg, ...);
};

void Foo::Write( const char* pMsg, ...)
{
    char buffer[4096];
    std::va_list arg;
    va_start(arg, pMsg);
    std::vsnprintf(buffer, 4096, pMsg, arg);
    va_end(arg);
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

In C++11 this is one possible solution using Variadic templates:

template<typename... Args>
void myprintf(const char* fmt, Args... args )
{
    std::printf( fmt, args... ) ;
}

EDIT

As @rubenvb points out there are trade-offs to consider, for example you will be generating code for each instance which will lead to code bloat.

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Are you using C or C++? The next C++ version, C++0x, will support variadic templates which provide a solution to that problem.

Another workaround can be achieved by clever operator overloading to achieve a syntax like this:

void f(varargs va) {
    BOOST_FOREACH(varargs::iterator i, va)
        cout << *i << " ";
}

f(args = 1, 2, 3, "Hello");

In order to get this to work, the class varargs has to be implemented to override operator = that returns a proxy object which, in turn, overrides operator ,. However, making this variant type safe in current C++ isn't possible as far as I know since it would have to work by type erasure.

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1  
C++03 could use boost::tuple which has ways to do the above safely. –  Mooing Duck Mar 4 '13 at 22:03

How do you mean a pure C/C++ solution?

The rest parameter (...) is supported cross platform in the C runtime.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/kb57fad8.aspx

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void myprintf(char* fmt, ...)
{
    va_ list args;
    va_ start(args,fmt);
    printf(fmt,args); ----> This is the fault. vprintf(fmt, args); should have been used.
    va_ end(args);
}
If you're just trying to call printf, 
there's a printf variant called vprintf that takes 
the va_list directly :  vprintf(fmt, args);
share|improve this answer

Actually, there's a way to call a function that has no va_list version from a wrapper. The idea is to use assembler, do not touch arguments in stack, and temporary replace the function return address.

Example for Visual C x86. call addr_printf calls printf():

__declspec( thread ) static void* _tls_ret;

static void __stdcall saveret(void *retaddr) {
    _tls_ret = retaddr;
}

static void* __stdcall _getret() {
    return _tls_ret;
}

__declspec(naked)
static void __stdcall restret_and_return_int(int retval) {
    __asm {
        call _getret
        mov [esp], eax   ; /* replace current retaddr with saved */
        mov eax, [esp+4] ; /* retval */
        ret 4
    }
}

static void __stdcall _dbg_printf_beg(const char *fmt, va_list args) {
    printf("calling printf(\"%s\")\n", fmt);
}

static void __stdcall _dbg_printf_end(int ret) {
    printf("printf() returned %d\n", ret);
}

__declspec(naked)
int dbg_printf(const char *fmt, ...)
{
    static const void *addr_printf = printf;
    /* prolog */
    __asm {
        push ebp
        mov  ebp, esp
        sub  esp, __LOCAL_SIZE
        nop
    }
    {
        va_list args;
        va_start(args, fmt);
        _dbg_printf_beg(fmt, args);
        va_end(args);
    }
    /* epilog */
    __asm {
        mov  esp, ebp
        pop  ebp
    }
    __asm  {
        call saveret
        call addr_printf
        push eax
        push eax
        call _dbg_printf_end
        call restret_and_return_int
    }
}
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