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I am developing a windows application with vs.NET 2010 and C# windows forms. This app has an user control that queries a service(WCF hosted on win service) and needs to do this without blocking the UI. The user control contains a grid that will show that results. I think that my situation is most common. My question to you is what can be done with C# in order for the following code to run smoother and with a better error handling. I am using MehtodInvoker so I can avoid writeing two seprate methods for this call - wait - fill scenario.

public void LoadData()
{
    StartWaitProgress(0);
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(x =>
    {
        try
        {
            MyDocMail[] mails;
            var history = Program.NoxProxy.GetDocumentHistory(out mails, Program.MySessionId, docId);
            this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate()
            {
                this.SuspendLayout();
                gridVersions.Rows.Clear();
                foreach (var item in history)
                {
                    gridVersions.Rows.Add();
                    int RowIndex = gridVersions.RowCount - 1;
                    DataGridViewRow demoRow = gridVersions.Rows[RowIndex];
                    demoRow.Tag = item.Id;
                    if (gridVersions.RowCount == 1)
                    {
                        demoRow.Cells[0].Value = Properties.Resources.Document_16;
                    }
                    demoRow.Cells[1].Value = item.Title; 
                    demoRow.Cells[2].Value = item.Size.GetFileSize();
                    demoRow.Cells[3].Value = item.LastModified;
                    demoRow.Cells[4].Value = item.CheckoutBy;
                    demoRow.Cells[5].Value = item.Cotegory;
                }
                gridEmails.Rows.Clear();
                foreach (var item in mails)
                {
                    gridEmails.Rows.Add();
                    int RowIndex = gridEmails.RowCount - 1;
                    DataGridViewRow demoRow = gridEmails.Rows[RowIndex];
                    demoRow.Tag = item.Id;
                    demoRow.Cells[1].Value = item.From;
                    demoRow.Cells[2].Value = item.To;
                    demoRow.Cells[3].Value = item.Date;
                }
                this.ResumeLayout();
            }));
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Program.PopError(ex);
            this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate() { this.Close(); })); 
        }
        finally { this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate() { StopWaitProgress(); })); }
    });
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There's nothing wrong with your solution, although you can accomplish it more easily with BackgroundWorker.

BackgroundWorker handles thread exceptions, calling Invoke on the WPF window, and helps with progress reporting and cancellation. More examples here.

P.S. Future versions of C# may make this even easier - check out the Async CTP.

share|improve this answer
    
You could also clean this up by using Task in the .NET 4 framework. –  Judah Himango Nov 10 '10 at 4:37
    
I have tried the BackgroundWorker solution back in C# 2.0, but I see no advantages, with BackgroundWorker I have to separate the code into multiple methods/events. In my app there are cases when in the same Form I make like 10 calls to the wcf service. To speed up this calls I have to make them in the same time(running parallel on the ThreadPool) so that will result in 10 instances of BackgroundWorker... The code above is more compact because I can rite a single method for each async call. –  Stefan P. Nov 10 '10 at 9:12
1  
Bear in mind you can instantiate BackgroundWorker programmatically, and use anonymous methods or lambda expressions to handle the events (this is usually what I do). The best solution depends on your end goal. Can you elaborate on what you mean by "smoother and with a better error handling"? –  Joe Albahari Nov 10 '10 at 10:53
    
Let's say I have 10 BackgroundWorkers for my async jobs, will they act like ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem or I risk to overload the cpu by starting too many thread? –  Stefan P. Nov 10 '10 at 11:45
    
BackgroundWorker uses the thread pool - so yes, they will act like ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem. –  Joe Albahari Nov 11 '10 at 4:37

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