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I'm using C# and WCF to do web services. I have a member variable of a class that implements IEnumerable. I tried to have it be serialized as part of my data contract by doing:

[DataContract]
class Item
{
    [DataMember]
    private IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, object>> Member1
    {
        get { return this._Properties; }
        set { this._Properties = Value; }
    }
}

Where _Properties is of type:

class PropertiesCollection:IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, object>>
{
    ...
}

I thought that WCF would serialize Member1 as an IEnumerable, because that's the type I gave to that member, but I'm getting an InvalidDataContractExceptiom, with this message:

Type PropertyCollectioncannot be serialized. Consider marking it with the DataContractAttribute attribute, and marking all of its members you want serialized with the DataMemberAttribute attribute. If the type is a collection, consider marking it with the CollectionDataContractAttribute. See the Microsoft .NET Framework documentation for other supported types.

It seems WCF is looking at the runtime type of the object being passed via Member1 (PropertyCollection) rather than the type of the property (IEnumenable). Is this understanding correct? Is the only fix adding [CollectionDataContract] to PropertiesCollection? I would prefer to keek the service contract non-specific (i.e. it just knows that iot is an IEnumerable), if possible.

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4 Answers 4

Off the top of my head: I think you need to decorate the Member1 property with the KnownType attribute.

see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms730167.aspx

[DataContract]
[KnownType(typeof(PropertiesCollection))] //<--- this guy here
class Item
{
    [DataMember]
    private IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, object>> Member1
    {
        get { return this._Properties; }
        set { this._Properties = Value; }
    }
}

Adding the code from Example2 in the link above to show how even though the attribute is a Class decorator, it applies to the DataMember:

public interface ICustomerInfo {}

[DataContract(Name = "Customer")]
public class CustomerTypeA : ICustomerInfo {}

[DataContract(Name = "Customer")]
public class CustomerTypeB : ICustomerInfo {}

[DataContract]
[KnownType(typeof(CustomerTypeB))] //<-- check it! This applies to 'buyer'
public class PurchaseOrder
{
    [DataMember]
    ICustomerInfo buyer;

    [DataMember]
    int amount;
}
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Assuming it works, Why If I want to switch my PropertiesCollection to a List<KeyValuePair<string, object>> in the future. Would that not break the DataContract? I would like to take a dependency on a IEnumerable rather than my specific current implementation, which is PropertiesCollection. –  David Reis Nov 10 '10 at 6:08
    
Knowntype is used to say "I am saying I will give you an animal, but don't freak out if I give you a dog or cat. They are of type animal so this is cool". So as long as the type you choose to return implements Ienumerable<KVP<string,object>>, AND you say it is a known type, all should be good. –  Joe Nov 10 '10 at 6:29
    
Your answer looks fishy. [KnownType] should be applied to the DataContract and not the DataMember! –  David Reis Nov 10 '10 at 7:27
1  
Look at Example2 in the link I posted. You are right in that you set the attribute on the DataContract, but it will apply for the member. You will have to put the DataContract attribute on your PropertiesCollection for it to work. –  Joe Nov 10 '10 at 16:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ehe real aswer to this question is that there are some requirements that a type must fulfill to be a valid collection DataContract:

  1. It must have a parameterless constructor
  2. It must have an Add Method.

When I implemented those my problem went away.

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You have to have DataContract in front of PropertiesCollection class definition:

 [DataContract]
 class PropertiesCollection:IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, object>>
 {
    ...
 }

Each of the types that enter serialization should be [DataContract] or [Serializable]

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That's not it. Serialization of collections is automatic and [DataContract] should not be needed. –  David Reis Nov 10 '10 at 18:53
    
What about those 'object' that are members of PropertiesCollection? Can they be serialized? What are those members anyway? –  veljkoz Nov 10 '10 at 20:19
    
An assumption is that they are either built in types, or they are KnownTypes to the DataContract. If not we will get an exception doing the deserialization, and that's expected. –  David Reis Nov 11 '10 at 1:39

Simplest solution:

  1. create new serializable Class containing key and value
  2. Pass this class in any collection
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