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I am only required to do RTRIM() in some part of query but if i do TRIM() will that affect performance.

Is Trim() Slower/Faster/Exaclty same(NOT even has negligable difference) compared to RTRIM() AND LTRIM()?

This is with respect to Oracle 10g ONLY.

But in case of SQL Server 2005, Do we have function / method 'x()' such that it can replace RTRIM(LTRIM(' blah.. blah.. ')) to a single function ?

I simply mean of having "single" function for doing the same functionality what both RTRIM() AND LTRIM() does.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Based on this rough test there is a small difference:

DECLARE
n PLS_INTEGER := DBMS_UTILITY.get_time;
s1 VARCHAR2(32767);
s2 VARCHAR2(32767);
BEGIN
s1 := LPAD('X',15000,' ') || RPAD('X',15000,' ');
FOR i IN 1..1000000 LOOP
  NULL;
END LOOP;
DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('Baseline: ' || (DBMS_UTILITY.get_time - n));
n := DBMS_UTILITY.get_time;
FOR i IN 1..1000000 LOOP
  s2 := LTRIM(s1);
END LOOP;
DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('LTRIM: ' || (DBMS_UTILITY.get_time - n));
n := DBMS_UTILITY.get_time;
FOR i IN 1..1000000 LOOP
  s2 := RTRIM(s1);
END LOOP;
DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('RTRIM: ' || (DBMS_UTILITY.get_time - n));
n := DBMS_UTILITY.get_time;
FOR i IN 1..1000000 LOOP
  s2 := TRIM(s1);
END LOOP;
DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('TRIM: ' || (DBMS_UTILITY.get_time - n));
END;

The difference amounts to up to 0.000128 hundredth's of a second in the worst case:

Baseline: 0
LTRIM: 113
RTRIM: 103
TRIM: 8
Baseline: 0
LTRIM: 136
RTRIM: 133
TRIM: 8
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The difference may be explained by the fact that LTRIM and RTRIM can trim a set of characters, whereas TRIM only has to look for a single character. –  Jeffrey Kemp Nov 10 '10 at 7:14
    
Thanks for analysis & explanation.But what in case of TRIM("specific-sequence-of-chars-instead-of-spaces-only"). –  Pratik Nov 10 '10 at 7:40
    
Ok, changed s1 := LPAD('X',32000,'X'); and the performance difference is reduced - less than 0.000091 hundredths of a second. –  Jeffrey Kemp Nov 10 '10 at 8:03
5  
What you should take away from this is that there is no practical difference; so you should always use whatever most closely fits what you want to do. –  Jeffrey Kemp Nov 10 '10 at 8:04
    
Thanks for your advice. –  Pratik Nov 10 '10 at 12:06

The question is irrelevant for SQL Server, since it implements LTRIM and RTRIM but not TRIM.

See the list of SQL 2005 string functions.

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Thanks for this. I have updated my question. Looking fwd for your rply. –  Pratik Nov 10 '10 at 11:59

I've never seen anything like a benchmark on the Trims in SQL Server. I've used it a lot and do find some minor performance when dealing with lots of data...minor performance.

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Irrespective of minor or undetectable diffrence/s in TRIM() and LTRIM()/RTRIM() how does it affect perfomance, even if it is of minimal/unrecognizable magnitude ? –  Pratik Nov 10 '10 at 6:41

The difference in performance will generally be undetectable, especially if it's within a query that gets its data from a table. Choose whichever fits your requirements.

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1  
Irrespective of minor or undetectable diffrence/s in TRIM() and LTRIM()/RTRIM() how does it affect perfomance, even if it is of minimal/unrecognizable magnitude ? –  Pratik Nov 10 '10 at 6:40
1  
If the difference is undetectable, that means we cannot say for sure whether one method is faster than the other. That's what "undetectable" means. –  Jeffrey Kemp Nov 10 '10 at 6:55
    
Thanks for a nice example.Still according me TRIM() would be slower than RTRIM() or LTRIM() but as i do not know algorithm used behind them or code inside it,so i was trying to find explanation or contradiction to my belief. –  Pratik Nov 10 '10 at 6:56

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