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Is there a shorter way of testing the following:

if (!((a == b) && (a == c) && (a == d) && (a == e) && (a == f)))

I ended up writing a method that lets me do this

if (!AllEqual(new[] { a, b, c, d, e, f }))

That feels nicer and is a lot more readable, but I'm wondering if there is something in the framework that does this already?

share|improve this question
2  
Your solution is the nicest I can think of off the top of my head. – Jackson Pope Nov 10 '10 at 7:10
up vote 13 down vote accepted

Well for one thing, you can use a parameter array to make it simpler:

public static bool AllEqual<T>(params T[] values)
...


if (AllEqual(a, b, c, d, e, f))
{
    ...
}

I don't think you'll find anything simpler than that, to be honest. I haven't seen this anywhere else, or in the framework. Well, I suppose there's one thing you could do in LINQ:

if (new { a, b, c, d, e, f }.Distinct().Count() == 1)

But that's pretty horrible :)

A slightly more efficient version of that is:

if (!(new { a, b, c, d, e, f }).Distinct().Skip(1).Any()))

... which will return false as soon as it finds the second distinct element. With only 6 elements I don't think it's worth worrying though :)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 And I also suggest OP not to use 6 bool variables, but one bool[] instead, which is also easier to query with .Distinct. – Danny Chen Nov 10 '10 at 7:18
    
@Danny: I think it depends on the context - if the variables have very distinct meanings which just happen to make sense, then keeping them separate makes sense. If they're more similar - e.g. "is field 1 filled in, is field 2 filled in" etc - then an array would indeed be better. – Jon Skeet Nov 10 '10 at 7:32
    
Thanks for the param array idea. It does make the call simpler. – My Other Me Nov 10 '10 at 8:16

Only if a, b, c, d, e and f are booleans values:

THe nicer way is to take a look in Boolean logic and logic gates to simplify your equation.

(The == is like an XNOR gate for boolean values)

An exemple for you:

(!((a == b) && (a == c) && (a == d) && (a == e) && (a == f)))

is the same than:

((a^b) || (a^c) || (a^d) || (a^e) || (a^f))

But I think it must be interesting do to a revue of the logic that comes to that

[EDIT] In relation with the Hightechrider's answers, the proposition

((a^b) || (a^c) || (a^d) || (a^e) || (a^f))

is equivalent to:

((a != b) || (a != c) || (a != d) || (a != e) || (a != f))

But Hightechrider's proposition work perfectly even if a, b, c, d, e and f are not booleans.

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I was aiming for readability. Though this is interesting I am not sure I will be able to read it tomorrow. – My Other Me Nov 10 '10 at 8:33
    
I can understand you if you're not aware on boolean logic: it took me a while to get used with it. however I think it's a very important think to learn, even if in this case Jon Skeet,'s answer seems to be the best solution, compared to your question ^^ – Pascal Qyy Nov 10 '10 at 8:39
1  
Obviously, I agree that completely factored/simplified form of a complex boolean expression is really hard to understand without a quick comment with its developed form – Pascal Qyy Nov 10 '10 at 8:43

You could distribute the ! into the expression:

if ((a != b) || (a != c) || (a != d) || (a != e) || (a != f)))

You could also use Any or ! All rather than adding a new method.

if (new[]{b, c, d, e, f}.Any(x => x != a)) ...
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Use BitArray:

Manages a compact array of bit values, which are represented as Booleans, where true indicates that the bit is on (1) and false indicates the bit is off (0).

// Your collection of bits
bool a = false, b = false, c = false;
// get them into an array
bool[] d = new bool[] { a, b, c };
// intialize BitArray with that array
System.Collections.BitArray e = new System.Collections.BitArray(d);
// use OfType<>, Any<>, All<>
if (Convert.ToBoolean(e.OfType<bool>().Any<bool>(condition => condition.Equals(true)) && e.OfType<bool>().Any<bool>(condition => condition.Equals(false)))) Console.WriteLine("some one is TRUE!.");

A sample Console Application code for demonstration:

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            bool a = false, b = false, c = false;
            bool[] d = new bool[] { a, b, c };
            System.Collections.BitArray e = new System.Collections.BitArray(d);
            if (Convert.ToBoolean(e.OfType<bool>().Any<bool>(condition => condition.Equals(true)) && e.OfType<bool>().Any<bool>(condition => condition.Equals(false)))) Console.WriteLine("some one is TRUE!.");
            if (Convert.ToBoolean(e.OfType<bool>().Any<bool>(condition => condition.Equals(true)) && e.OfType<bool>().Any<bool>(condition => condition.Equals(false)))) Console.WriteLine("some one is FALSE!.");
            if (Convert.ToBoolean(e.OfType<bool>().All<bool>(condition => condition.Equals(true)))) Console.WriteLine("All of them are TRUE!.");
            if (Convert.ToBoolean(e.OfType<bool>().All<bool>(condition => condition.Equals(false)))) Console.WriteLine("All of them are false!.");
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

MSDN Documentation on BitArray

share|improve this answer

How about..

List<bool> arr = new List<bool>{ a, b, c, d, f };
bool allEqual = arr.TrueForAll(x => { return x; }) || arr.TrueForAll(x => { return !x; });

Looks pretty elegant to me. :)

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You could use this to check that they are all true:

if (a && b && c && d && e && f) {
    ...
}

and this to check that they are all false:

if (!(a || b || c || d || e || f)) {
    ...
}

and you could combine both to check that they are all equal:

if ((a && b && c && d && e && f) || !(a || b || c || d || e || f))
    ...
}

But quite frankly, this is not better than your original solution :-)

Based on the above, here is a possible implementation of AllEqual:

public static bool AllEqual(bool[] values)
{
    bool andTerm = true;
    bool orTerm = false;
    foreach (bool v in values)
    {
        andResult &= v;
        orResult |= v;
    }
    return andTerm || !orTerm;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
False: in (a && b && c && d && e && f) if a, b, c, d, e, and f are true, your solution return true, whereas (!((a == b) && (a == c) && (a == d) && (a == e) && (a == f))) return false, and !(a || b || c || d || e || f) return true if a, b, c, d, e, and f are false whereas (!((a == b) && (a == c) && (a == d) && (a == e) && (a == f))) return false... And the third alway return true when a, b, c, d, e and f are equal, unlike (!((a == b) && (a == c) && (a == d) && (a == e) && (a == f))) who always return false in this case... – Pascal Qyy Nov 10 '10 at 8:12
    
@G. Qyy: The title of the question says: "How can I test that multiple booleans have identical values in c#?". The code snippets in the question actually use this to test that they values are not equal, but an AllEqual function is what the OP is explicitly asking for. My answer explains: 1) How to test for all true, 2) How to test for all false, 3) How to test for all equal. My code does what I say it does. – Grodriguez Nov 10 '10 at 8:37
    
You're right in this point: I understand he want to reproduce the behavior of it's first test, and I care a few of title because they rarely expose the complete complexity of the question... Of course, your code is right compared at what you say it does. my apologies ^^ – Pascal Qyy Nov 10 '10 at 9:06

I don't think it's such a good idea to introduce a dependency to a framework only for that.

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3  
He said the framework - as in the main .NET framework, I'd imagine. – Jon Skeet Nov 10 '10 at 7:13
    
Sorry, you're right. – Simone Nov 10 '10 at 7:15

That's not something people usually want to know. You could easily check that they were all true by just and-ing them together, or that they were all false by and-ing their nots together. It's also popular in C++ to cast bools to ints and add them up - in your case you'd be looking for a total of 6 or 0. But I think both of those would obscure whatever business reason you have for knowing that 6 flags are either all true or all false.

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