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hey, i made db connection in C# with SQL but there is some drawbacks which i want to cover it. e.g. when i update even if there if no record it will not show an error also will not UPDATE. Same case with DELETE.

private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    setData();
    bool flag = db.UpdateData("UPDATE trytb SET Name = '"+dc.Name+"' WHERE ID = '"+dc.ID+"'");
    if (flag)
        MessageBox.Show("Record Updated");
    else
        MessageBox.Show("Not Updated");
}

public bool DeleteData(string qry)
{
    try
    {
        conn.Open();
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(qry, conn);
        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        flag = true;
        conn.Close();
        return flag;
    }
    catch
    {
        return flag;
    }
}
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You are relying on flag being false by default. This works, but it's bad practice and hard to read/understand –  smirkingman Nov 10 '10 at 8:00
3  
A sidenote: please use parameterized queries instead of string concatenation to avoid SQL-Injection attacks. –  David Schmitt Nov 10 '10 at 8:01
2  
@David - poor "Bobby Tables" will be upset if you fix that... –  Marc Gravell Nov 10 '10 at 8:05
    
ROFL! Marc... i sent that cartoon to my girlfriend... she didn't get it :O –  The_Butcher Nov 10 '10 at 8:07
    
your problem is you don't successfully update a record and delete a record? Right? –  yonan2236 Nov 10 '10 at 8:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your flag variable is being set to true unconditionally. You should set it to true based on the return value of cmd.ExecuteNonQuery(). that will tell you if zero or more records were updated/deleted. And based on that, you can set your flag.

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thanks it worked –  salman Nov 10 '10 at 8:29

How about refactoring your code to something like this:

private buttonUpdate_Click((object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // You should use parameterized query. But for now, this example would do.
    string sql = "UPDATE TABLE SET NAME = " + dc.Name + " WHERE ID = '" + dc.ID +"'";
    bool flag = UpdateRecord(sql);

    if(flag)
        MessageBox.Show("Record updated!");
    else
        MessageBox.Show("Update failed!");
}

private bool UpdateRecord(sql)
{
    bool flag = false; // Presume update failed.

    SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(yourConnString);
    try
    {
         conn.Open();
         SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(sql);
         flag = (bool)cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
    catch
    {
          // Do some error logging.
    }
    finally
    {
         // Finally block always execute, so close here your connection and return here the flag value.
         conn.Close();
         return flag; // Return default value of flag, (false)
    }
    return flag; 
}
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ExecuteNonQuery can return the number of rows affected; you can catch that and react accordingly; you would generally expect it to be 1 (unless you have triggers etc):

For UPDATE, INSERT, and DELETE statements, the return value is the number of rows affected by the command. When a trigger exists on a table being inserted or updated, the return value includes the number of rows affected by both the insert or update operation and the number of rows affected by the trigger or triggers. For all other types of statements, the return value is -1. If a rollback occurs, the return value is also -1.

For more complex queries, returning a value related to @@ROWCOUNT (captured at some point in the query) may be useful, along with ExecuteScalar. In some cases you may need to check the data manually for existence.

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