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I have the following HTML code:

  <div class="outer_container">
     <div id="imgContainer">
       <img src="/some/image" />              
     </div>

     <div id="slogan">
       <span class="quote">Some text here</span>
     </div>

     <div id="footer" class="gray_top_border">
       Some text here
     </div>
  </div>

And this is my CSS:

.outer_container {
  background-color:#FFFFFF;
  margin:0 auto;
  width:960px;
}

#slogan {
  font-size: 3em;
  position: relative;
  z-index: 999;
  bottom: 50px;
  left: 50px;
}

#footer {
  border-top:1px solid #B5B5B5;
  min-height:50px;
  padding:10px;
}

Using this code, I get a 3em gap between image and footer.
If I change position from relative to absolute, the gap problem is gone. But then the top / left position is relative to the browser window, and not within the DIV container.

How can I float text over the image without creating this gap?

share|improve this question
    
@stevan you gave slogan as relative , if so why did you give them bottom and left , it should be only for position:absolute right. –  kobe Nov 10 '10 at 8:29
    
@stevan , if the footer wants to stap 50px from bottom and left you should make footer as absolute and parent as relative –  kobe Nov 10 '10 at 8:30
1  
You probably haven't set the parent container's position, you need to do this for the #slogan element to have the desired effect, please post the rest of your CSS so we can see how the element is interacting with others :) –  Kyle Nov 10 '10 at 8:33
    
@Kyle: Added rest of the code now. –  Steven Nov 10 '10 at 8:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This does it:

#slogan {
  font-size: 3em;
  position: relative;
  height: 0;
  overflow: visible;
  z-index: 999;
  bottom: 50px;
  left: 50px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
is it good practice to give postion relative and bottom , left –  kobe Nov 10 '10 at 8:43
    
No it's not good practice, but I was answering the question. The fact is, adding those two parameters (height and overflow) does work to remove the gap, and however you set the position after that is a different matter. –  Nathan MacInnes Nov 10 '10 at 8:48
    
Thanks Nathan, this worked. Probably not an ideal solution, but it works :) –  Steven Nov 10 '10 at 8:58
    
PS. Why is using bottom, left not good practice when suing realtive position? –  Steven Nov 10 '10 at 8:59
    
It causes bugs. There's no reason it's not an ideal solution unless you need to set the height of the positioned element. If you do, just stick a div inside it and set the height of that... but we're starting to get into hacky territory if we do that. :) –  Nathan MacInnes Nov 10 '10 at 9:17

can you try the below css.

 #slogan {
      font-size: 3em;
      position: relative;
      z-index: 999;
      margin-top:-20px;

    }

    #footer {
position:absolute;
bottom:10px

      border-top:1px solid #B5B5B5;
      min-height:50px;
      padding:10px;
    }
share|improve this answer

"Position: relative" still reserves the area the text would have been in. This means it can make some weird padding/margin issues once in a while.

"position: absolute" does not reserve the area. I recommend just using that instead of hacking around with the relative one.

http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_positioning.asp

You can wrap the whole thing in a new div that's position: relative then your absolute pixels will go out from that instead of screen 0,0.

"An absolute position element is positioned relative to the first parent element that has a position other than static. If no such element is found, the containing block is ."

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