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If Start=0 and Count=10 then how to get the alternate values using Enumerable.Range() the out put should be like { 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18}

and if Start=1 and Count=10 then {1, 3, 5, 7, 9,11, 13, 15, 17, 19 }

The continuous value can be get like

var a = Enumerable.Range(0,10).ToList();

but how to get the alternate values?

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What about for loop? –  Thomas Anderson Nov 10 '10 at 8:35
    
@ Thomas Anderson: Using ` for` loop we can do this. But can we do this using LINQ ? –  Thorin Oakenshield Nov 10 '10 at 8:36
3  
@Thomas: People began to hate for/foreach loop when once they used LINQ. LINQ is the fashion, while for is antique. So they try to use LINQ even for is much more suitable. –  Danny Chen Nov 10 '10 at 8:41
4  
Your two examples both have Start=0 and Count=10 - was that what you intended? –  Will Dean Nov 10 '10 at 8:45
1  
@Pramodh - btw, the .Select(X => X) part of your expression above is redundant and can be removed. var a = Enumerable.Range(0,10).ToList(); does the exact same thing. –  Øyvind Knobloch-Bråthen Nov 16 '10 at 13:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you are after here does not exist in the BCL as far as I'm aware of, so you have to craete your own static class like this to achieve the required functionality:

public static class MyEnumerable {
  public static IEnumerable<int> AlternateRange(int start, int count) {
    for (int i = start; i < start + count; i += 2) {
      yield return i;
    }
  }
}

Then you can use it like this wherever you want to:

foreach (int i in MyEnumerable.AlternateRange(0, 10)) {
  //your logic here
}

You can then also perform LINQ queries using this since it returns IEnumerable

So if you want you can aleo write the above like this if you want to exclude the number 6

foreach (int i in MyEnumerable.AlternateRange(0, 10).Where( j => j != 6)) {
  //your logic here
}

I hope this is what you are after.

You can't have this as an extension method on Enumerable directly since that is a static class, and extension methods work on a object of a class, and not the class itself. That's why you have to create a new static class to hold this method if you want to mimic the Enumerable class.

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+1 nice solution –  Thorin Oakenshield Nov 10 '10 at 8:54
    
This solution is not nearly as good as leppie's or abatishchev's underneath. –  Todd Berman Dec 13 '13 at 0:26

Halving the number of items that Range should generate (its second parameter) and then doubling the resulting values will give both the correct number of items and ensure an increment of 2.

Enumerable.Range(0,5).Select(x => x * 2)
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12  
Odd numbers left as an excercise for the reader. –  user180326 Nov 10 '10 at 8:48
1  
I don't know what I was thinking! My downvote was locked in until the answer was edited so I added an explanation so that I could reverse it. My apologies! –  Scott Munro Feb 21 '13 at 12:24
Enumerable.Range(0, 10).Where(i => i % 2 == 0); // { 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 }
Enumerable.Range(0, 10).Where(i => i % 2 != 0); // { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }
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1  
This is the best answer. I'd like to add that you can use this for any increment, and it beats the heck out of creating a custom class that hard-code skips every other element. For example, if I'm writing code for selecting the minutes in a TimeSpan, and I only want to show 15 minute increments: Enumerable.Range(0, 60).Where(i => i%15 == 0) –  DaveH Sep 27 '12 at 17:32

The count parameter in your code looks like an end point of the loop.

public static MyExt
{
  public static IEnumerable<int> Range(int start, int end, Func<int, int> step)
  {
    //check parameters
    while (start <= end)
    {
        yield return start;
        start = step(start);
    }
  }
}

Usage: MyExt.Range(1, 10, x => x + 2) returns numbers between 1 to 10 with step 2 MyExt.Range(2, 1000, x => x * 2) returns numbers between 2 to 1000 with multiply 2 each time.

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Will hang with x => x –  Nickmaovich Jan 3 at 6:54

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