Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a history table containing a snapshot of each time a record is changed. I'm trying to return a certain history row with the original captured date. I am currently using this at the moment:

select
    s.Description,
    h.CaptureDate OriginalCaptureDate
from
    HistoryStock s
    left join 
        ( select 
              StockId,
              CaptureDate
          from
              HistoryStock
          where
              HistoryStockId in ( select MIN(HistoryStockId) from HistoryStock group by StockId )
        ) h on s.StockId = h.StockId
where
    s.HistoryStockId = @HistoryStockId

This works but with 1 Million records its on the slow side and I'm not sure how to optimize this query.

How can this query be optimized?

UPDATE:

WITH OriginalStock (StockId, HistoryStockId)
AS  (
    SELECT  StockId, min(HistoryStockId)
    from HistoryStock group by StockId
    ),
OriginalCaptureDate (StockId, OriginalCaptureDate) 
As (
   SELECT h.StockId, h.CaptureDate
   from HistoryStock h join OriginalStock o on h.HistoryStockId = o.HistoryStockId
  )

select
    s.Description,
    h.OriginalCaptureDate
from
    HistoryStock s left join OriginalCaptureDate h on s.StockId = h.StockId
where
    s.HistoryStockId = @HistoryStockId

I've update the code to use CTE but I'm not better off performance wise, only have small performance increase. Any ideas?

Just another note, I need to get to the first record in the history table for StockId and not the earliest Capture date.

share|improve this question
    
You are restricting the final query using HistoryStockId, which I assume restricts it to only one StockId, but it appears you are joining ALL the history records to then get this result. Have you tried restricting the CTE using your parameter @HistoryStockId? Posting the execution plan of the query would help. –  Tony Nov 10 '10 at 13:38
    
Could you show us the column schema for all the relevant columns of HistoryStock ? (that's the only table here, right?) –  AakashM Nov 10 '10 at 13:48
    
You seem to have an additional CTE which is redundant as far as I can see, OriginalCaptureDate is unnecessary - why not do your final select based on it and select the fields you're interested in?. You are also performing a LEFT JOIN where an INNER JOIN would be appropriate. As stated above you are also filtering on historystockid at the last point in your statement - why not filter on this in the first place to reduce the data set being examined? –  JamWheel Nov 16 '10 at 9:05

2 Answers 2

I am not certain I understand entirely how the data works from your query but nesting queries like that is never good for performance in my opinion. You could try something along the lines of:

    WITH MinCaptureDate (StockID, MinCaptureDate)
AS  (
    SELECT   HS.StockID
        ,MIN(HS.CaptureDate) AS OriginalCaptureDate
    FROM    HistoryStock    HS
    GROUP BY 
         HS.Description
    )
SELECT   HS.Description
    ,MCD.OriginalCaptureDate
FROM    HistoryStock    HS
JOIN    MinCaptureDate  MCD
    ON HS.StockID = MCD.StockID
WHERE   HS.StockID = @StockID
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip on CTE, but adjusting my query to use CTE does only give me a 2 sec performance increase. Any other ideas? –  adriaanp Nov 10 '10 at 10:47
    
@adriaanp: You say there is a 2s speed increase, what is the execution time of you query? I have been testing with some random data and your query returns in <1s on my server, using 3 million records... what's the spec of your SQL box? –  Tony Nov 10 '10 at 14:41

I think i see what you are trying to achieve. You basically want the description of the specified history stock record, but you want the date associated with the first history record for the stock... so if your history table looks like this

StockId   HistoryStockId   CaptureDate   Description
1         1                Apr 1         Desc 1
1         2                Apr 2         Desc 2
1         3                Apr 3         Desc 3

and you specify @HistoryStockId = 2, you want the following result

Description   OriginalCaptureDate
Desc 2        Apr 1

I think the following query would give you a slightly better performance.

WITH OriginalStock (StockId, CaptureDate, RowNumber) 
AS  ( 
    SELECT  
        StockId, 
        CaptureDate,
        RowNumber = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY StockId ORDER BY HistoryStockId ASC)
    from HistoryStock 
    )

select 
    s.Description, 
    h.CaptureDate 
from 
    HistoryStock s left join OriginalStock h on s.StockId = h.StockId and h.RowNumber = 1
where 
    s.HistoryStockId = @HistoryStockId 
share|improve this answer
    
You have a syntax error, remove the "," after the WITH clause. Also this query performs significantly worse in my testing than the others already presented. –  Tony Nov 11 '10 at 8:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.