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im looking for the fastest way to serialize and deserialize .NET object. Here is what i have so far...

public class TD
{
    public List<CT> CTs { get; set; }
    public List<TE> TEs { get; set; }
    public string Code { get; set; }
    public string Message { get; set; }
    public DateTime StartDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime EndDate { get; set; }

    public static string Serialize(List<TD> tData)
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<TD>));

        TextWriter writer = new StringWriter();
        serializer.Serialize(writer, tData);

        return writer.ToString();
    }

    public static List<TD> Deserialize(string tData)
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<TD>));

        TextReader reader = new StringReader(tData);

        return (List<TD>)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
    }        
}
share|improve this question
2  
Performance or code foot print? – ulrichb Nov 10 '10 at 10:34
    
Are you asking me do i need performance data or code? – aron Nov 10 '10 at 10:41
2  
He's asking if, by "fastest way," you mean in terms of performance or in terms of code footprint. BinaryFormatter is extremely fast in terms of code and implementation, but a solution like Marc's will perform faster in a benchmark. – Cody Gray Nov 10 '10 at 11:54
    
ok, i see, i meant in terms of performance... – aron Nov 10 '10 at 11:58
    
There are many links out there. One such: blogs.msdn.com/b/youssefm/archive/2009/07/10/… – nawfal Jul 10 '14 at 10:33
up vote 42 down vote accepted

Here's your model (with invented CT and TE) using protobuf-net (yet retaining the ability to use XmlSerializer, which can be useful - in particular for migration); I humbly submit (with lots of evidence if you need it) that this is the fastest (or certainly one of the fastest) general purpose serializer in .NET.

If you need strings, just base-64 encode the binary.

[XmlType]
public class CT {
    [XmlElement(Order = 1)]
    public int Foo { get; set; }
}
[XmlType]
public class TE {
    [XmlElement(Order = 1)]
    public int Bar { get; set; }
}
[XmlType]
public class TD {
    [XmlElement(Order=1)]
    public List<CT> CTs { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order=2)]
    public List<TE> TEs { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order = 3)]
    public string Code { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order = 4)]
    public string Message { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order = 5)]
    public DateTime StartDate { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order = 6)]
    public DateTime EndDate { get; set; }

    public static byte[] Serialize(List<TD> tData) {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream()) {
            ProtoBuf.Serializer.Serialize(ms, tData);
            return ms.ToArray();
        }            
    }

    public static List<TD> Deserialize(byte[] tData) {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream(tData)) {
            return ProtoBuf.Serializer.Deserialize<List<TD>>(ms);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks Marc for the effort – aron Nov 10 '10 at 10:56
1  
G'day Marc, love the protocol-buffers work you've done and I know this post is almost 5yrs old but the netserializer quoted in an answer here (Binoj) has metrics indicating your implementation isn't the fastest. Is that a fair statement/advertisement or is there a trade off? thanks – Jeremy Thompson Apr 15 '15 at 14:22
    
ok I see now, NetSerialization only works for the same version where as I am looking for Version Tolerant Serialization – Jeremy Thompson Apr 15 '15 at 14:47

A comprehansive comparison between diffreent formats made by me in this post- http://maxondev.com/serialization-performance-comparison-c-net-formats-frameworks-xmldatacontractserializer-xmlserializer-binaryformatter-json-newtonsoft-servicestack-text/

Just one sample from the post- enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
That's not speed. That's slowness. It says "smaller is better" in the article linked. – Timur Nuriyasov Feb 1 at 13:56
    
@TimurNuriyasov, that's the time took to do the operation – Maxim Feb 1 at 15:11
1  
So you say binary is the slowest? I don't think so! I guess it correctly refers to speed, not time. – Javid Mar 12 at 20:27

Protobuf is very very fast.

See http://code.google.com/p/protobuf-net/wiki/Performance for in depth information concerning the performance of this system, and an implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
Are there any drawbacks to using Protobuf? – Robert Jeppesen Nov 10 '10 at 10:55
5  
You have to annotate your objects. Protobuf does not store the field names and types as the serializers do, but take them from your actual types. This is one of the reasons the target files are much smaller. The documentation explains all of this. I've been using it for some time now, and if you need fast (de)serialization and small target files, protobuf really is the way to go. – Pieter van Ginkel Nov 10 '10 at 11:03
    
Any full source code sample using Protobut in C# for add to the answer? – Kiquenet Feb 15 '13 at 11:59

Yet another serializer out there that claims to be super fast is netserializer.

The data given on their site shows performance of 2x over protobuf, I have not tried this myself, but if you are evaluating various options, try this as well

share|improve this answer
1  
I just tried NetSerializer in my application and it works wonders. It is worth a try. – Galen Jun 19 '15 at 17:54

The binary serializer included with .net should be faster that the XmlSerializer. Or another serializer for protobuf, json, ...

But for some of them you need to add Attributes, or some other way to add metadata. For example ProtoBuf uses numeric property IDs internally, and the mapping needs to be somehow conserved by a different mechanism. Versioning isn't trivial with any serializer.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it is very fast indeed, and it handles a lot more cases/types than the Xml one. – leppie Nov 10 '10 at 10:56

You can try Salar.Bois serializer which has a decent performance. Its focus is on payload size but it also offers good performance.

There are benchmarks in the Github page if you wish to see and compare the results by yourself.

https://github.com/salarcode/Bois

share|improve this answer

I took the liberty of feeding your classes into the CGbR generator. Because it is in an early stage it doesn't support DateTime yet, so I simply replaced it with long. The generated serialization code looks like this:

public int Size
{
    get 
    { 
        var size = 24;
        // Add size for collections and strings
        size += Cts == null ? 0 : Cts.Count * 4;
        size += Tes == null ? 0 : Tes.Count * 4;
        size += Code == null ? 0 : Code.Length;
        size += Message == null ? 0 : Message.Length;

        return size;              
    }
}

public byte[] ToBytes(byte[] bytes, ref int index)
{
    if (index + Size > bytes.Length)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("index", "Object does not fit in array");

    // Convert Cts
    // Two bytes length information for each dimension
    GeneratorByteConverter.Include((ushort)(Cts == null ? 0 : Cts.Count), bytes, ref index);
    if (Cts != null)
    {
        for(var i = 0; i < Cts.Count; i++)
        {
            var value = Cts[i];
            value.ToBytes(bytes, ref index);
        }
    }
    // Convert Tes
    // Two bytes length information for each dimension
    GeneratorByteConverter.Include((ushort)(Tes == null ? 0 : Tes.Count), bytes, ref index);
    if (Tes != null)
    {
        for(var i = 0; i < Tes.Count; i++)
        {
            var value = Tes[i];
            value.ToBytes(bytes, ref index);
        }
    }
    // Convert Code
    GeneratorByteConverter.Include(Code, bytes, ref index);
    // Convert Message
    GeneratorByteConverter.Include(Message, bytes, ref index);
    // Convert StartDate
    GeneratorByteConverter.Include(StartDate.ToBinary(), bytes, ref index);
    // Convert EndDate
    GeneratorByteConverter.Include(EndDate.ToBinary(), bytes, ref index);
    return bytes;
}

public Td FromBytes(byte[] bytes, ref int index)
{
    // Read Cts
    var ctsLength = GeneratorByteConverter.ToUInt16(bytes, ref index);
    var tempCts = new List<Ct>(ctsLength);
    for (var i = 0; i < ctsLength; i++)
    {
        var value = new Ct().FromBytes(bytes, ref index);
        tempCts.Add(value);
    }
    Cts = tempCts;
    // Read Tes
    var tesLength = GeneratorByteConverter.ToUInt16(bytes, ref index);
    var tempTes = new List<Te>(tesLength);
    for (var i = 0; i < tesLength; i++)
    {
        var value = new Te().FromBytes(bytes, ref index);
        tempTes.Add(value);
    }
    Tes = tempTes;
    // Read Code
    Code = GeneratorByteConverter.GetString(bytes, ref index);
    // Read Message
    Message = GeneratorByteConverter.GetString(bytes, ref index);
    // Read StartDate
    StartDate = DateTime.FromBinary(GeneratorByteConverter.ToInt64(bytes, ref index));
    // Read EndDate
    EndDate = DateTime.FromBinary(GeneratorByteConverter.ToInt64(bytes, ref index));

    return this;
}

I created a list of sample objects like this:

var objects = new List<Td>();
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    var obj = new Td
    {
        Message = "Hello my friend",
        Code = "Some code that can be put here",
        StartDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-7),
        EndDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(2),
        Cts = new List<Ct>(),
        Tes = new List<Te>()
    };
    for (int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
    {
        obj.Cts.Add(new Ct { Foo = i * j });
        obj.Tes.Add(new Te { Bar = i + j });
    }
    objects.Add(obj);
}

Results on my machine in Release build:

var watch = new Stopwatch();
watch.Start();
var bytes = BinarySerializer.SerializeMany(objects);
watch.Stop();

Size: 149000 bytes

Time: 2.059ms 3.13ms

Edit: Starting with CGbR 0.4.3 the binary serializer supports DateTime. Unfortunately the DateTime.ToBinary method is insanely slow. I will replace it with somehting faster soon.

Edit2: When using UTC DateTime by invoking ToUniversalTime() the performance is restored and clocks in at 1.669ms.

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Having an interest in this, I decided to test the suggested methods with the closest "apples to apples" test I could. I wrote a Console app, with the following code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace SerializationTests
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var count = 100000;
            var rnd = new Random(DateTime.UtcNow.GetHashCode());
            Console.WriteLine("Generating {0} arrays of data...", count);
            var arrays = new List<int[]>();
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                var elements = rnd.Next(1, 100);
                var array = new int[elements];
                for (int j = 0; j < elements; j++)
                {
                    array[j] = rnd.Next();
                }   
                arrays.Add(array);
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Test data generated.");
            var stopWatch = new Stopwatch();

            Console.WriteLine("Testing BinarySerializer...");
            var binarySerializer = new BinarySerializer();
            var binarySerialized = new List<byte[]>();
            var binaryDeserialized = new List<int[]>();

            stopWatch.Reset();
            stopWatch.Start();
            foreach (var array in arrays)
            {
                binarySerialized.Add(binarySerializer.Serialize(array));
            }
            stopWatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("BinaryFormatter: Serializing took {0}ms.", stopWatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

            stopWatch.Reset();
            stopWatch.Start();
            foreach (var serialized in binarySerialized)
            {
                binaryDeserialized.Add(binarySerializer.Deserialize<int[]>(serialized));
            }
            stopWatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("BinaryFormatter: Deserializing took {0}ms.", stopWatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);


            Console.WriteLine();
            Console.WriteLine("Testing ProtoBuf serializer...");
            var protobufSerializer = new ProtoBufSerializer();
            var protobufSerialized = new List<byte[]>();
            var protobufDeserialized = new List<int[]>();

            stopWatch.Reset();
            stopWatch.Start();
            foreach (var array in arrays)
            {
                protobufSerialized.Add(protobufSerializer.Serialize(array));
            }
            stopWatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("ProtoBuf: Serializing took {0}ms.", stopWatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

            stopWatch.Reset();
            stopWatch.Start();
            foreach (var serialized in protobufSerialized)
            {
                protobufDeserialized.Add(protobufSerializer.Deserialize<int[]>(serialized));
            }
            stopWatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("ProtoBuf: Deserializing took {0}ms.", stopWatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

            Console.WriteLine();
            Console.WriteLine("Testing NetSerializer serializer...");
            var netSerializerSerializer = new ProtoBufSerializer();
            var netSerializerSerialized = new List<byte[]>();
            var netSerializerDeserialized = new List<int[]>();

            stopWatch.Reset();
            stopWatch.Start();
            foreach (var array in arrays)
            {
                netSerializerSerialized.Add(netSerializerSerializer.Serialize(array));
            }
            stopWatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("NetSerializer: Serializing took {0}ms.", stopWatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

            stopWatch.Reset();
            stopWatch.Start();
            foreach (var serialized in netSerializerSerialized)
            {
                netSerializerDeserialized.Add(netSerializerSerializer.Deserialize<int[]>(serialized));
            }
            stopWatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("NetSerializer: Deserializing took {0}ms.", stopWatch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);

            Console.WriteLine("Press any key to end.");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        public class BinarySerializer
        {
            private static readonly BinaryFormatter Formatter = new BinaryFormatter();

            public byte[] Serialize(object toSerialize)
            {
                using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
                {
                    Formatter.Serialize(stream, toSerialize);
                    return stream.ToArray();
                }
            }

            public T Deserialize<T>(byte[] serialized)
            {
                using (var stream = new MemoryStream(serialized))
                {
                    var result = (T)Formatter.Deserialize(stream);
                    return result;
                }
            }
        }

        public class ProtoBufSerializer
        {
            public byte[] Serialize(object toSerialize)
            {
                using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
                {
                    ProtoBuf.Serializer.Serialize(stream, toSerialize);
                    return stream.ToArray();
                }
            }

            public T Deserialize<T>(byte[] serialized)
            {
                using (var stream = new MemoryStream(serialized))
                {
                    var result = ProtoBuf.Serializer.Deserialize<T>(stream);
                    return result;
                }
            }
        }

        public class NetSerializer
        {
            private static readonly NetSerializer Serializer = new NetSerializer();
            public byte[] Serialize(object toSerialize)
            {
                return Serializer.Serialize(toSerialize);
            }

            public T Deserialize<T>(byte[] serialized)
            {
                return Serializer.Deserialize<T>(serialized);
            }
        }
    }
}

The results surprised me; they were consistent when run multiple times:

Generating 100000 arrays of data...
Test data generated.
Testing BinarySerializer...
BinaryFormatter: Serializing took 336.8392ms.
BinaryFormatter: Deserializing took 208.7527ms.

Testing ProtoBuf serializer...
ProtoBuf: Serializing took 2284.3827ms.
ProtoBuf: Deserializing took 2201.8072ms.

Testing NetSerializer serializer...
NetSerializer: Serializing took 2139.5424ms.
NetSerializer: Deserializing took 2113.7296ms.
Press any key to end.

Collecting these results, I decided to see if ProtoBuf or NetSerializer performed better with larger objects. I changed the collection count to 10,000 objects, but increased the size of the arrays to 1-10,000 instead of 1-100. The results seemed even more definitive:

Generating 10000 arrays of data...
Test data generated.
Testing BinarySerializer...
BinaryFormatter: Serializing took 285.8356ms.
BinaryFormatter: Deserializing took 206.0906ms.

Testing ProtoBuf serializer...
ProtoBuf: Serializing took 10693.3848ms.
ProtoBuf: Deserializing took 5988.5993ms.

Testing NetSerializer serializer...
NetSerializer: Serializing took 9017.5785ms.
NetSerializer: Deserializing took 5978.7203ms.
Press any key to end.

My conclusion, therefore, is: there may be cases where ProtoBuf and NetSerializer are well-suited to, but in terms of raw performance for at least relatively simple objects... BinaryFormatter is significantly more performant, by at least an order of magnitude.

YMMV.

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