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im looking for the fastest way to serialize and deserialize .NET object. Here is what i have so far...

public class TD
{
    public List<CT> CTs { get; set; }
    public List<TE> TEs { get; set; }
    public string Code { get; set; }
    public string Message { get; set; }
    public DateTime StartDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime EndDate { get; set; }

    public static string Serialize(List<TD> tData)
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<TD>));

        TextWriter writer = new StringWriter();
        serializer.Serialize(writer, tData);

        return writer.ToString();
    }

    public static List<TD> Deserialize(string tData)
    {
        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<TD>));

        TextReader reader = new StringReader(tData);

        return (List<TD>)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
    }        
}
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1  
Performance or code foot print? –  ulrichb Nov 10 '10 at 10:34
    
Are you asking me do i need performance data or code? –  aron Nov 10 '10 at 10:41
2  
He's asking if, by "fastest way," you mean in terms of performance or in terms of code footprint. BinaryFormatter is extremely fast in terms of code and implementation, but a solution like Marc's will perform faster in a benchmark. –  Cody Gray Nov 10 '10 at 11:54
    
ok, i see, i meant in terms of performance... –  aron Nov 10 '10 at 11:58
    
There are many links out there. One such: blogs.msdn.com/b/youssefm/archive/2009/07/10/… –  nawfal Jul 10 at 10:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Here's your model (with invented CT and TE) using protobuf-net (yet retaining the ability to use XmlSerializer, which can be useful - in particular for migration); I humbly submit (with lots of evidence if you need it) that this is the fastest (or certainly one of the fastest) general purpose serializer in .NET.

If you need strings, just base-64 encode the binary.

[XmlType]
public class CT {
    [XmlElement(Order = 1)]
    public int Foo { get; set; }
}
[XmlType]
public class TE {
    [XmlElement(Order = 1)]
    public int Bar { get; set; }
}
[XmlType]
public class TD {
    [XmlElement(Order=1)]
    public List<CT> CTs { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order=2)]
    public List<TE> TEs { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order = 3)]
    public string Code { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order = 4)]
    public string Message { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order = 5)]
    public DateTime StartDate { get; set; }
    [XmlElement(Order = 6)]
    public DateTime EndDate { get; set; }

    public static byte[] Serialize(List<TD> tData) {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream()) {
            ProtoBuf.Serializer.Serialize(ms, tData);
            return ms.ToArray();
        }            
    }

    public static List<TD> Deserialize(byte[] tData) {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream(tData)) {
            return ProtoBuf.Serializer.Deserialize<List<TD>>(ms);
        }
    }
}
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thanks Marc for the effort –  aron Nov 10 '10 at 10:56

Protobuf is very very fast.

See http://code.google.com/p/protobuf-net/wiki/Performance for in depth information concerning the performance of this system, and an implementation.

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Are there any drawbacks to using Protobuf? –  Robert Jeppesen Nov 10 '10 at 10:55
    
@Robert - compared to what ;p (everything is a trade) –  Marc Gravell Nov 10 '10 at 11:01
4  
You have to annotate your objects. Protobuf does not store the field names and types as the serializers do, but take them from your actual types. This is one of the reasons the target files are much smaller. The documentation explains all of this. I've been using it for some time now, and if you need fast (de)serialization and small target files, protobuf really is the way to go. –  Pieter van Ginkel Nov 10 '10 at 11:03
    
Any full source code sample using Protobut in C# for add to the answer? –  Kiquenet Feb 15 '13 at 11:59

A comprehansive comparison between diffreent formats made by me in this post- http://maxondev.com/serialization-performance-comparison-c-net-formats-frameworks-xmldatacontractserializer-xmlserializer-binaryformatter-json-newtonsoft-servicestack-text/

Just one sample from the post- enter image description here

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The binary serializer included with .net should be faster that the XmlSerializer. Or another serializer for protobuf, json, ...

But for some of them you need to add Attributes, or some other way to add metadata. For example ProtoBuf uses numeric property IDs internally, and the mapping needs to be somehow conserved by a different mechanism. Versioning isn't trivial with any serializer.

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Yes, it is very fast indeed, and it handles a lot more cases/types than the Xml one. –  leppie Nov 10 '10 at 10:56

Based on my experience the fastest way to serialize object in C# is done by using binary serialization.

using (Stream stream = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Create))
{
    BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
    bf.Serialize(stream, this.TD);
}
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9  
BinaryFormatter as "fastest" is not supported by numbers: here, here or here –  Marc Gravell Nov 10 '10 at 11:01

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