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I am programming in c++ using TDD, which suggests to use inversion of control when creating objects (when creating objects of certain class, pass constructed objects to it's constructor). This is fine, but how do I create objects required for the constructor?

Right now, I am using a factory (which I can easy change for my unit tests), which returns a shared_ptr pointing to the created object. Is this the correct way, or are there better ways of doing this?

Very simplified example demonstrates what I am doing :

#include <iostream>

struct A {
    virtual ~A() { }
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

struct B : A {
    virtual ~B() { }
    virtual void foo() { std::cout<<"B::foo()"<<std::endl; }
};

struct C {
    C( A *a ) : a(a) { }
    void DoSomething() { a->foo(); }

    A *a;
};

int main() {
    C c( new B );

    c.DoSomething();
}

against this :

#include <iostream>

struct A {
    virtual ~A() { }
    virtual void foo() = 0;
};

struct B : A {
    virtual ~B() { }
    virtual void foo() { std::cout<<"B::foo()"<<std::endl; }
};

struct C {
    C() : a() { }
    void DoSomething() { a.foo(); }

    B a;
};

int main() {
    C c;   // the object of type B is constructed in the constructor

    c.DoSomething();
}

EDIT1

This link explains the IoC for java, but as you may know, in java you can do something like this:

class B
{
};
class A
{
  public:
    A( B b )
...
};

...
A objA( new B );   // this doesn't work in c++
...
share|improve this question
    
Any links to the concept of Inversion of Control –  Chubsdad Nov 10 '10 at 11:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use the Builder design pattern. Builder and Factory are very similar design patterns, but specifically Builder creates an object made of multiple components by first building its components.

That is what you do in IOC. You build the components then pass them as parameters to the object.

When I created this model (4 times!) the builders store builders of the parameter objects, and lexicographical representations of scalar information. You can also allow vectors and maps.

The first thing you need in an IOC system is a configuration file. Often (but not always) components are loaded into your system through runtime dynamic library loading.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 That would work. I do not need full run time flexibility - I just want to ease unit testing (and allow using mocks). Can you just tell what is your builder returning? Pointer? The object (this needs copy-constructor)? Shared pointer? Something else? –  BЈовић Nov 10 '10 at 11:31
1  
Builders are classes, and you use them to create your object.Mine has a getObject() method which is public and createObject() which is private and virtual and called by getObject() to ensure once-only creation but multiple gets. createObject() should return a pointer, but getObject returns a shared_ptr. createObject() returns a pointer to allow co-variance. My Builder works together with the ObjectLoader which binds parameter names to builders of the other objects it needs. –  CashCow Nov 10 '10 at 11:45

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