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the following code has compilation error in the line of t3:

public <E> List<E> getList()
{
    return new ArrayList<E>();
}
public <T> void first()
{
    List<T> ret = new ArrayList<T>();
    List<T> list = getList();
    T t1 = ret.get(0);
    T t2 = list.get(0);
    T t3 = getList().get(0);
}

The error message is: Type mismatch: cannot convert from Object to T

I know I can fix the problem using casting or manual binding, my questions is: is it so difficult for the compiler to do auto-binding, is there a case that it will fail?

Edit: added the error message.

Edit: added another example how the error does not occurred.

Edit: removed the second example since it was confusing, made the question more clear.

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1  
When you are asking a question, you need to make sure you give the error message too in the question. –  Sachin Shanbhag Nov 10 '10 at 11:09
    
It would help if you gave us the exact error message. –  thecoop Nov 10 '10 at 11:09
    
found a similar question with partial explanation: stackoverflow.com/questions/2055352/… –  oshai Nov 10 '10 at 17:04
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the first case you have two generic methods with type parameters named T, but these type parameters are different, so let's assign different names to them:

public <E> List<E> getList() { ... }
public <T> void first() { ... }

Then it works as follows:

  1. An element of List<T> (that is object of type T) is assigned to the variable of type T, so everything works fine:

     List<T> ret = new ArrayList<T>();   
     T t1 = ret.get(0);
    
  2. Firstly, an object of type List<E> is assigned to List<T>. This statement works fine since type parameter E is inferred from the type of the left side of assignment, so T = E. Then it works as in the previous case:

     List<T> list = getList();          
     T t2 = list.get(0);
    
  3. In this case you are trying to assign object of type E to the variable of type T, but E cannot be inferred and therefore assumed to be Object, so assignment fails:

      T t3 = getList().get(0);         
    

    You can fix this behaviour by binding E to T manually:

      T t3 = this.<T>getList().get(0);
    

In the case of generic class TestGenerics<T> you don't have two independent type parameters, so T in both methods refers to the same type.

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regarding 3, why E cannot be inferred, because it is indirect? is it so complicated for the compiler? –  oshai Nov 10 '10 at 13:25
2  
@ohadshai: Result type is inferred only "If the method result occurs in a context where it will be subject to assignment conversion" (JLS §15.12.2.8), that is if result is immediately assigned or used as an argument in method call. –  axtavt Nov 10 '10 at 13:37
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You are calling a generics method from generics method. You need to pass the generics argument from the first method to the getList method.

List<T> list = this.<T>getList();

and

T t3 = this.<T>getList().get(0);

From these two the first compiles also without giving the generics argument because the compiler can get the type from the type of list (from the left side of the assignment). In the second case it isn't a direct assignment and so the compiler does not know the type for the getList() call.

These may behave differently with different compilers.

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can you explain why? in t2 I didnt have to do it. –  oshai Nov 10 '10 at 12:08
    
@ohadshai Because compiler is able to find the type automatically when assigning the getList() result to a local variable with correct type. –  iny Nov 10 '10 at 12:45
    
this is exactly my question (and I rephrased it). is there a case where such auto-binding is not correct? –  oshai Nov 10 '10 at 13:36
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I believe the answer from axtavt to be more correct than my own. Since mine contains a bit of speculation on my part and the other answer explains all the observed behaviour, cites relevant sources and makes general sense I ask you to read axtavts answer instead.

For completeness sake, I will leave my original answer here. Just don't take it for absolute truth.


The signature of java.util.List.get is as follows:

 public abstract java.lang.Object get(int arg0);

get() returns Object, regardless of the parameterization of the type. That is why you cannot assign get(0) to a variable of type T. Even though you can (practically) guarantee that there will always be a T in the list, the interface just doesn't make that promise and the compiler cannot take your word for it.

The problem appears to be with type-erasure. When you compile this code, it will work just fine:

public <T> void someMethod(java.util.List<T> list) {
    T s = list.get(0);
}

The compiler knows it's dealing with a List<T> and can use the signature for List<T> when compiling. It knows that get() will return a T and is perfectly happy. If you change the code to this it no longer works:

public <T> List<T> getList() {
    return new ArrayList<T>();
}

public <T> void someMethod() {
    T s = getList().get(0);
}

The reason for this may be that when compiling the getList() method, the types are erased and it will now return a non-generic java.util.List type. get() on List returns Object and the compiler would no longer be aware that it used to be a List<T> and will complain.

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I added the second example, as you can see there, the erasure is for the whole class and then there is no error. what is the reason? –  oshai Nov 10 '10 at 12:30
    
even though your explanation centred around erasure seems to be the closest, but i still can't understand why it should matter if you operate on a generic reference directly, or you work indirectly with a generic reference obtained through a method call. i feel there is something to do w/ how the compiler works, and exactly at what point do the type erasures take place. –  anirvan Nov 10 '10 at 13:31
    
Please read axtavts answer instead of this one. I believe that one to be the correct one. –  Gerco Dries Nov 10 '10 at 14:38
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Try casting it to the type T.

    public <T> List<T> getList()
    {
        return new ArrayList<T>();
    }
    public <T> void first()
    {
        List<T> ret = new ArrayList<T>();
        List<T> list = getList();
        T t1 = ret.get(0);
        T t2 = list.get(0);
        T t3 = (T) getList().get(0);
    }
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The getList() method seems to be returning a new list each time which is initially empty. get(0) from an empty list will throw an IllegalArgumentException. This is a runtime error though so it may not be causing the compile error.

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