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Consider the following as a reference implementation:

/* calculates (a * b) / c */
uint32_t muldiv(uint32_t a, uint32_t b, uint32_t c)
{
    uint64_t x = a;
    x = x * b;
    x = x / c;
    return x;
}

I am interested in an implementation (in C or pseudocode) that does not require a 64-bit integer type.

I started sketching an implementation that outlines like this:

/* calculates (a * b) / c */
uint32_t muldiv(uint32_t a, uint32_t b, uint32_t c)
{
    uint32_t d1, d2, d1d2;
    d1 = (1 << 10);
    d2 = (1 << 10);
    d1d2 = (1 << 20); /* d1 * d2 */
    return ((a / d1) * (b /d2)) / (c / d1d2);
}

But the difficulty is to pick values for d1 and d2 that manage to avoid the overflow ((a / d1) * (b / d2) <= UINT32_MAX) and minimize the error of the whole calculation.

Any thoughts?

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3  
Implementing a 64 bit multiplication and division from the 32 bit one is one obvious way. It –  AProgrammer Nov 10 '10 at 12:17
    
What do you want to happen when the result does not fit in 32 bits? (UINT_MAX * UINT_MAX / 1 for example) –  pmg Nov 10 '10 at 12:19
    
@pmg: same as the reference implementation, surely - return the mathematical result modulo (UINT_MAX+1). That's what "reference implementation" means in my dictionary ;-) –  Steve Jessop Nov 10 '10 at 12:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have adapted the algorithm posted by Paul for unsigned ints (by omitting the parts that are dealing with signs). The algorithm is basically Ancient Egyptian multiplication of a with the fraction floor(b/c) + (b%c)/c (with the slash denoting real division here).

uint32_t muldiv(uint32_t a, uint32_t b, uint32_t c)
{
    uint32_t q = 0;              // the quotient
    uint32_t r = 0;              // the remainder
    uint32_t qn = b / c;
    uint32_t rn = b % c;
    while(a)
    {
        if (a & 1)
        {
            q += qn;
            r += rn;
            if (r >= c)
            {
                q++;
                r -= c;
            }
        }
        a  >>= 1;
        qn <<= 1;
        rn <<= 1;
        if (rn >= c)
        {
            qn++; 
            rn -= c;
        }
    }
    return q;
}

This algorithm will yield the exact answer as long as it fits in 32 bits. You can optionally also return the remainder r.

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Searching on www.google.com/codesearch turns up a number of implementations, including this wonderfuly obvious one. I particularly like the extensive comments and well chosen variable names

INT32 muldiv(INT32 a, INT32 b, INT32 c)
{ INT32 q=0, r=0, qn, rn;
  int qneg=0, rneg=0;
  if (c==0) c=1;
  if (a<0) { qneg=!qneg; rneg=!rneg; a = -a; }
  if (b<0) { qneg=!qneg; rneg=!rneg; b = -b; }
  if (c<0) { qneg=!qneg;             c = -c; }

  qn = b / c;
  rn = b % c;

  while(a)
  { if (a&1) { q += qn;
               r += rn;
               if(r>=c) { q++; r -= c; }
             }
    a  >>= 1;
    qn <<= 1;
    rn <<= 1;
    if (rn>=c) {qn++; rn -= c; }
  }
  result2 = rneg ? -r : r;
  return qneg ? -q : q;
}

http://www.google.com/codesearch/p?hl=en#HTrPUplLEaU/users/mr/MCPL/mcpl.tgz|gIE-sNMlwIs/MCPL/mintcode/sysc/mintsys.c&q=muldiv%20lang:c

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The algorithm gets even a bit simpler for unsigned integers :) –  Sven Marnach Nov 10 '10 at 13:03
    
I actually think this algorithm is the best answer so far. It's the only one that really works in all cases it possible can work in (that is, the result fits in 32 bits). –  Sven Marnach Nov 10 '10 at 13:10

The simplest way would be converting the intermediar result to 64 bits, but, depending on value of c, you could use another approach:

((a/c)*b  +  (a%c)*(b/c) + ((a%c)*(b%c))/c

The only problem is that the last term could still overflow for large values of c. still thinking about it..

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1  
Hm. I don't see how that would work... 123 * 45 / 100 = 55, but ((123 % 100) * (45 % 100)) % 100 = 35. –  Guffa Nov 10 '10 at 12:19
    
The problem there of course is that (a % c) * b can still overflow. As you say it depends on the value of c. If a and b are both quite large, but c is even larger, you're basically done for. –  Steve Jessop Nov 10 '10 at 12:20
1  
@Guffa: But what ruslik suggests is (123/100) * 45 + ((123 % 100) * 45)/ 100 is 45 + (23 * 45) / 100, which is 55, which is correct. –  Steve Jessop Nov 10 '10 at 12:22
    
@Steve Jessop I've changed the last term so that it won't overflow. –  ruslik Nov 10 '10 at 12:24
1  
@ruslik: (a%c)*(b%c) still overflows if 2^16 < a < b < c. Well, I said "overflow", I should have said "wraps around", since the C standard says that unsigned arithmetic doesn't "overflow" by definition. Point is, it loses information that's needed for the result. –  Steve Jessop Nov 10 '10 at 12:28

You can first divide a by c and also get the reminder of the division, and multiply the reminder with b before dividing it by c. That way you only lose data in the last division, and you get the same result as making the 64 bit division.

You can rewrite the formula like this (where \ is integer division):

a * b / c =
(a / c) * b =
(a \ c + (a % c) / c) * b =
(a \ c) * b + ((a % c) * b) / c

By making sure that a >= b, you can use larger values before they overflow:

uint32_t muldiv(uint32_t a, uint32_t b, uint32_t c) {
  uint32_t hi = a > b ? a : b;
  uint32_t lo = a > b ? b : a;
  return (hi / c) * lo + (hi % c) * lo / c;
}

Another approach would be to loop addition and subtraction instead of multiplying and dividing, but that is of course a lot more work:

uint32_t muldiv(uint32_t a, uint32_t b, uint32_t c) {
  uint32_t hi = a > b ? a : b;
  uint32_t lo = a > b ? b : a;
  uint32_t sum = 0;
  uint32_t cnt = 0;
  for (uint32_t i = 0; i < hi; i++) {
    sum += lo;
    while (sum >= c) {
      sum -= c;
      cnt++;
    }
  }
  return cnt;
}
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1  
The problem with your first approach is that (a % c) * b can wrap around. The second approach is intersting but I think that sum could warp around. It is a pain working with large values! –  Pedro Pedruzzi Nov 11 '10 at 21:29

I suppose there are reasons you can't do

x = a/c;
x = x*b;

are there? And maybe add

y = b/c;
y = y*a;

if ( x != y )
    return ERROR_VALUE;

Note that, since you're using integer division, a*b/c and a/c*b might lead to different values if c is bigger than a or b. Also, if both a and b are smaller than c it won't work.

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It doesn't work if both a and b are lower than c. For example 20*30/100 = 6 while (20/100)*30 = 0 and (30/100)*20 = 0. –  Guffa Nov 10 '10 at 12:46
    
I said it in the post already. Perhaps not explicitly, so I corrected it. –  lorenzog Nov 10 '10 at 13:00

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