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Which of the following two should I be using to make sure that all the cursors are closed?

    Cursor c = getCursor(); 

    if(c!=null && c.getCount()>0){ 
        try{ 
            // read values from cursor 
        }catch(..){} 
        finally{ 
            c.close(); 
        } 
    }//end if

    OR

    Cursor c = getCursor(); 
    try{ 
        if(c!=null && c.getCount()>0){ 
            // read values from cursor 
        }//end if 
    }catch(..){

    }finally{ 
        c.close(); 
    } 

EDIT:
A few questions:
1. Do we need to call close() on a cursor which has count of 0?
2. Because in that case for the first idiom, close() will never be called. It assumes that for a cursor having no elements, cursor will never be opened. Is this a valid assumption?

Please advise.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Neither, but the second one was closest.

  • Option 1 doesn't properly close the Cursor when getCount() == 0
  • Option 2 leaves the finally block exposed to a null pointer exception

I would use:

Cursor c = getCursor(); 
try { 
    if(c!=null && c.getCount()>0){ 
         // do stuff with the cursor
    }
}
catch(..) {
    //Handle ex
}
finally { 
    if(c != null) {
        c.close(); 
    }
}

... or if you expect the cursor to be null frequently, you could turn it on its head a little bit:

Cursor c = getCursor(); 
if(c != null) {
    try { 
        if(c.getCount()>0) { 
             // do stuff with the cursor
        }
    }
    catch(..) {
        //Handle ex
    }
    finally { 
        c.close(); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your answer! –  Frank Costello Nov 11 '10 at 17:19
    
i don't think use getCount is a good method. if you user moveToFirst, you can get better performance –  wangzhengyi Sep 13 '14 at 2:03
    
@wangzhengyi - That's a valid point moveToFirst is more performant AND answers the question of "is there anything in the result set"... but OP used getCount() in their example so I continued it here. –  skylarsutton Sep 14 '14 at 22:57

This is even better:

  • does not use c.getCount() - counting might require extra work for the database and is not needed
  • initialize the cursor before the query block, so failure to create the query is not followed by the finally block

The code:

Cursor c = query(....);
if (c != null) {
   try {        
       while (c.moveToNext()) {  // If empty or after last record it returns false.    
          // process row...
       }
   } 
   finally {
       c.close();
    }
}

Note that c might be null in case of error or empty cursor. See http://stackoverflow.com/a/16108435/952135. I would report null return value in case of empty cursor as a bug, though.

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NPE is an issue, query could return null. –  Pin Feb 11 '14 at 15:35
    
I meant no c != null check is necessary in finally. If query returns null, it will fail with NPE, the same as Hemant's snippet would. And I think the query() method will never return null. It should create the query, or throw an exception, in which case you don't need to run the finally block. This is normal cleanup pattern: create resource ... try ... do work ... finally ... clean up ... end. If creation fails, it is reported. If work fails or succeeds, finally does the cleanup. If you understand, please remove negative vote. If not, please write. –  Oliv Feb 17 '14 at 9:12
1  
It can return null and it's specified in the docs (see ContentResolver.query). Also, check this: stackoverflow.com/questions/13080540/… –  Pin Feb 18 '14 at 10:13
    
Ok, but null return value is not specified. As it is mentioned in the post, it may be due to some error or due to empty cursor. I think this ambiguity is worth reporting as a bug. I'll update my answer. Thanks. –  Oliv Feb 24 '14 at 11:43

I'd say the first one, mainly because the second one will try to call c.close() even if c is null. Also, according to the docs, getCount()doesn't throw any exceptions, so there's no need to include it in the try block.

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Do we need to call close() on a cursor which has count of 0? Because in that case for the first idiom, close() will never be called. It assumes that for a cursor having no elements, cursor will never be opened. Is this a valid assumption? –  Frank Costello Nov 10 '10 at 12:56
    
No. A Cursor needs to be closed no matter how many items it has. –  Felix Nov 10 '10 at 14:41
    
You can just skip the c.getCount() > 0 condition. This way, your cursor will always be closed, and your try block will simply do nothing. –  Felix Nov 10 '10 at 14:44

Best practice is the one below:

Cursor c = null;    
try {        
   c = query(....);      
   while (c.moveToNext()) {  // If empty or next to last record it returns false.    
      // do stuff..       
   }
} finally {
   if (c != null && !c.isClosed()) {  // If cursor is empty even though should close it.       
   c.close();
   c = null;  // high chances of quick memory release.
}
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Depends on what you're catching, but I'd say the second one, just in case c.getCount() throws an exception.

Also, some indentation wouldn't go amiss :)

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I think my answer is the best one :

    Cursor cursor = null;

    try {
        cursor = rsd.rawQuery(querySql, null);
        if (cursor.moveToFirst()) {
            do {
                // select your need data from database
            } while (cursor.moveToNext());
        }
    } finally {
        if (cursor != null && !cursor.isClosed()) {
            cursor.close();
            cursor = null;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
if this answer is not good, please tell me why you think this model is worse –  wangzhengyi Sep 15 '14 at 6:29

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