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I am creating several Perl modules which will use the common utilities for opening and closing files.

For example,

mod1.pm

my $in, $out;

sub openf {
    my $fname = shift;
    open $in, "<",  $fname or die $!;
}

sub one {
    openf($path);
    ...
}

mod2.pm

my $in, $out;

sub openf {
    my $fname = shift;
    open $in, "<",  $fname or die $!;
}

sub two {
    openf($path);
    ...
}

Now, where should I put openf so that the code is not duplicated?

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3  
Honestly, this is a frustrating piece of code to look at: open is a fine function, use it. However, if you are going to write something like this, at least name if open_for_reading and also include the name of the file in the error message. Second, why do you have variables to be used as filehandles in package scope. This is going to lead to a whole bunch of contortions on your part to keep things straight. Think more about your design while you still have time. –  Sinan Ünür Nov 10 '10 at 18:55
    
about first) You should realize that the codes that I post here are just sample codes. Obviously openf does a lot more stuff in the actual code. Here I am abstracting out the code that is necessary for the question rather than posting the whole 100 lines for a doubt in a single line. about second) variables are used as file handles in package scope because they are used by some subroutines within the perl module to open/close files, for example. –  Lazer Nov 10 '10 at 19:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I'd say go with the simplest solution.

Make a 3rd module, Common.pm or Helpers.pm or MyUtils.pm - store all the common boilerplate helper subroutines there.

You will then import it from both of the modules above as well as anywhere else.

A slightly different approach is - instead of simply use-ing Commmon.pm - to actually inherit all your modules from it. That way they can extend the common utils as needed in OO fashion.

We actually did that with a large project, sub-classing almost 100% of modules from either BaseClass.pm or BaseClassPlus.pm which was its subclass. Worked very well and was very conductive to well-maintainable code due to significantly less boilerplate. (I have a feeling we could have done a large part of the work with Moose but that was before I even knew Moose existed)

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@DVK: Where should I keep $in and $out then? –  Lazer Nov 10 '10 at 12:23
    
@Lazer - that depends on whether $in is used anywhere outside the utilities subs. If not, keep it - as my - in Common.pm –  DVK Nov 10 '10 at 12:27
    
@Lazer - if it's used outside those routines, keep it as our package variable in Common.pm and export it, or - better yet - make it my again and provide get/set accessors. You'll thank yourself for having an in() accessor sub in 1 year when you wish to do some devilishly clever thing involving all uses of $in :) –  DVK Nov 10 '10 at 12:29
    
If I do keep the code duplicated as mentioned in the question, can I use both the modules from the same Perl file? Would that result in a conflict (openf defined twice)? –  Lazer Nov 10 '10 at 13:04
    
@Lazer - the last should be asked as a separate SO question IMHO...I don't mind answering but it's a good enough question that it would benefit other users if it was in its own separate Q&A instead of a comment thread. –  DVK Nov 10 '10 at 15:17

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