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I'm on US-English OS X 10.6.4 and try to store files with Asian characters in its name in a Git repository.

OK, let's create such a file in a Git working tree:

$ touch どうもありがとうミスターロボット.txt

Git is showing it as octal-escaped UTF-8 form:

$ git version
git version 1.7.3.1
$ git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#   "\343\201\250\343\202\231\343\201\206\343\202\202\343\201\202\343\202\212\343\201\213\343\202\231\343\201\250\343\201\206\343\203\237\343\202\271\343\202\277\343\203\274\343\203\255\343\203\233\343\202\231\343\203\203\343\203\210.txt"
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

Unfortunately, I'm not able to add it to the Git repository:

$ git add どうもありがとうミスターロボット.txt
$ git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#   "\343\201\250\343\202\231\343\201\206\343\202\202\343\201\202\343\202\212\343\201\213\343\202\231\343\201\250\343\201\206\343\203\237\343\202\271\343\202\277\343\203\274\343\203\255\343\203\233\343\202\231\343\203\203\343\203\210.txt"
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

Git simply ignored this file.

Using wildcards work:

$ git add *.txt
$ git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git rm --cached <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   new file:   "\343\201\250\343\202\231\343\201\206\343\202\202\343\201\202\343\202\212\343\201\213\343\202\231\343\201\250\343\201\206\343\203\237\343\202\271\343\202\277\343\203\274\343\203\255\343\203\233\343\202\231\343\203\203\343\203\210.txt"
#

but I want to invoke the Git command from an application for a specific file name. I don't have the option to invent wildcard patterns which match exactly this file, but no one else.

Is this a known bug of Git or me not using Git correctly?

share|improve this question
3  
I think this is a known bug between git and OSX : thread.gmane.org/gmane.comp.version-control.git/70688 –  Vincent Demeester Nov 10 '10 at 12:50
    
I don't think that it is related to composed/decomposed characters like German umlauts. –  Mot Nov 10 '10 at 15:54
2  
Given that the first two characters in the octal string above are U+3068 HIRAGANA LETTER TO and U+3099 COMBINING KATAKANA-HIRAGANA VOICED SOUND MARK, I think Vincent is correct. –  Huw Nov 24 '10 at 22:06
1  
GitX seems to handle this even tough git itself doesn't. Maybe you can poke around it's source code and see what it's doing. github.com/pieter/gitx –  rwilliams Nov 26 '10 at 2:01
1  
What should I do with that libgit2? I'm a Git user, no Git developer. –  Mot Nov 26 '10 at 13:20
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2 Answers

All you need to do is to implement the IGit interface using your customised repository class (make sure each method is marked as virtual) and then cast this interface implementation against the GitX modular cohesion heap. I've done this before and it solved my problem.

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3  
Simply Brilliant. –  vcsjones Dec 12 '10 at 19:56
    
@vcsjones, shouldn't that be brillant? –  Dave Vogt Dec 14 '10 at 14:26
    
Powerful resolution. –  Xiè Jìléi Jan 4 '11 at 15:31
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Git quotes any non-ascii character by default, not only asian ones. There's an option to disable this quoting behaviour.

You can disable it using the following command:

git config --global core.quotepath false

Or, alternatively, by adding the following snippet to your git config file ($HOME/.gitconfig usually)

[core]
    quotepath = false

After this, git should show your filenames exactly as they are.

As to your other problem, git not adding a file with asian characters, I can only guess that it has to do with the encoding that git uses is not the same as the encoding your terminal uses. I hope someone else can jump in and explain that bit.

share|improve this answer
    
In my limited testing (using Git 1.7.3.2 on Ubuntu), once I disabled core.quotepath, git would display the filenames as expected. Also, even with core.quotepath enabled, explicitly adding would update the index as expected, so the original problem may have been a bug that got fixed in newer versions of Git. –  Emil Sit Dec 13 '10 at 17:00
    
Do you know whether this quoting can be disabled by setting an environment variable or passing a command line parameter to Git? –  Mot Jul 30 '11 at 6:47
1  
Although my problem is slightly different, an accénted character, not an asian one, but, this advice did not work for me. –  John Scipione Apr 9 '13 at 3:32
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